Touring the Great Allegheny Passage on a Trek 7100

Discussion in 'Touring and recreational cycling' started by gtm1226, Jul 13, 2011.

  1. gtm1226

    gtm1226 New Member

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    I have a Trek 7100 (2006 model) equipped with fenders, headlight, tail light, rear rack, rear trunk/panniers, handlebar bag, multiple water bottle cages, etc. that I will use to ride the Great Allegheny Passage from Pittsburgh to Cumberland, MD (and possibly back). This "machine" is stock, but I have added the above extras, and a few others, to outfit it for touring (I realize there is far more to a touring bicycle that my bolt ons). However, I have done a few distance rides on this bike and so far it has served me well. Additionally, I am planning a day long 70 mile ride as a test run for GAP ride. I am very interested in touring but do not want to invest in a "true" touring bicylce yet. I am a fairly strong rider/runner/athele and also ride a mountain bike and a road bike. Does anyone have any thoughts/suggestions on using a Trek 7100, as outfitted above, for touring? Any other suggestions... Am I crazy, or is this possible?
     
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  2. KD5NRH

    KD5NRH New Member

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    Take a full set of Allen wrenches; my stem and faceplate have occasionally loosened themselves up for no apparent reason, and it would really suck to have that end a tour early.

    Also, take some extra spokes, and keep an eye on the back axle. You may want to pick up a spare axle or two just in case, as bent back axle seems to be the most common complaint after spoke breakage for this bike. Other than those, the 7100 is a pretty solid bike.
     
  3. bbud

    bbud New Member

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    I just finished a X-country tour (west to east) with a ride down the GAP, as well as the C&O towroad into Washington D.C.. The GAP is a wonderful trail, smoother than some paved sections I rode! And although the C&O is a bit rougher, it too is do-able with a road bike. I was riding a Bridgestone RB2 with 700x25, and had no problems. I think with wider tires, one wouldn't have to have ones eyes glued to the path as I was.

    In short, I'd take the same tools I'd consider for any multi-day tour.

    Great camping spots along the way. Check the water sources before unloading your bike, as some of the water pumps were a bit sketchy.

    Have fun,

    Bob
     
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