Touring Tuscany, which tires to use?

Discussion in 'rec.bicycles.rides' started by ga_gandalf, Dec 26, 2005.

  1. ga_gandalf

    ga_gandalf Guest

    Which tires to use on the back rodes for touring?

    The 28cc or the 35cc?

    Any information on routes or where to stay will be helpful.

    Travelling from Milan to Rome, month of April

    Thanks
     
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  2. dorkypants

    dorkypants Guest

    ga_gandalf wrote:
    > Which tires to use on the back rodes for touring?
    >
    > The 28cc or the 35cc?
    >
    > Any information on routes or where to stay will be helpful.
    >
    > Travelling from Milan to Rome, month of April
    >
    > Thanks


    It might help to know a little more about where and on what kind of
    surfaces you anticipate riding, and how heavily loaded your bike will
    be. On paved roads (with no luggage) I found 23 mm or 25 mm wide tires
    perfectly serviceable. Even on unpaved "fire trail" class roads 25 mm
    wide tires are fine. Fully loaded with luggage, you may want wider
    tires.
     
  3. I've toured a fair bit of Tuscany.

    Some advice.

    It's extremely hilly. If you stay on the "minor" main roads they're
    fine.

    The really tiny roads are killingly steep and are often dead-ends.

    The scenery really is exceptional. The food is poor. Italian food is
    the biggest hype there is. It's much finer in Italian restaurants
    abroad. The people are friendly.
     
  4. dorkypants

    dorkypants Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > The scenery really is exceptional. The food is poor. Italian food is
    > the biggest hype there is. It's much finer in Italian restaurants
    > abroad. The people are friendly.


    This reminds me of a line in the book "Too Much Tuscan Sun". The
    author, a bilingual Italian tour guide, recounts that some American
    clients of his complained that Italians don't know how to make Italian
    food, it's much better back home (in the US).

    In my own experience, as long as I avoid the tourist traps the food is
    very good to excellent, it's only a question of how much you pay: it's
    usually very reasonable (even with the current exchange rates and
    keeping in mind that groceries are extremely cheap in the US, compared
    to Italy), but once in a while it can turn out to be absurdly
    expensive.

    If you're willing to venture beyond "meat and potatoes" (or burgers and
    fries) to try rabbit, wild boar, goat, venison, even horsemeat; fruits
    and vegetables unfamiliar in the US (medlars, cardoons, fennel...); and
    not be put off when served fish, shrimp or lobster with the head still
    on, you'll expand your choices and enjoy the cuisine more.

    I haven't been in Tuscany for a while: It may be that restaurants
    travelers now encounter there tend towards the mediocre and/or
    overpriced, perhaps a consequence of too many tourists. There are other
    parts to Italy, with their own distinctive character, less well known
    because they haven't been written up as much, where things haven't been
    spoiled by an excess of tourism.

    Oh, you're not obliged to obey the antipasto (optional appetizer),
    primo (pasta/risotto/soup), secondo (main disk), contorno
    (vegetable/salad/starch), dolce (optional desserrt) dining-out pattern
    of courses. You can have a couple of primi and nothing else, only the
    secondo, etc., as your appetite and taste dictate. Just remember that
    if the secondo is, say, chicken, you most likely will get chicken and
    nothing else on the plate.

    If you stop in a "bar" (Italian for cafe) for a refreshment, it's a lot
    cheaper to consume your beverage standing at the counter than if you
    take a table, when a cover charge kicks in. Restaurants will invariably
    include a cover charge on your bill: it's supposed to account for the
    bread, linens and table service. Eat your meals at Italian mealtimes:
    at other times, it may be just about impossible to find anything
    substantial to eat (big cities excluded).
     
  5. ga_gandalf

    ga_gandalf Guest

    I will be carrying about 20 lbs

    plan to get away from the tourist roads

    I have heard that the road become unpaved

    I used 28cc when I did the Blue Ridge Parkway,

    however they were all excellently paved

    thanks
    "ga_gandalf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Which tires to use on the back rodes for touring?
    >
    > The 28cc or the 35cc?
    >
    > Any information on routes or where to stay will be helpful.
    >
    > Travelling from Milan to Rome, month of April
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >
     
  6. The Italian tour guide was right.
    I'm an omnivore. I've eaten superb Italian food here in Cork, Ireland,
    in Britain, in Germany and elsewhere. The standard in Tuscany in any of
    the famous places is lousy, mainly I think because they have a captive
    audience.
    I've eaten off the beaten track there and it was better, but not
    fantastic.
     
  7. Rick

    Rick Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > I've toured a fair bit of Tuscany.
    >
    > Some advice.
    >
    > It's extremely hilly. If you stay on the "minor" main roads they're
    > fine.
    >
    > The really tiny roads are killingly steep and are often dead-ends.


    Not so bad; steep, but so are some of the hills in my area.

    > The scenery really is exceptional. The food is poor. Italian food is
    > the biggest hype there is. It's much finer in Italian restaurants
    > abroad


    Not so, in my experience. We count the food we have had in Umbria and
    Tuscany as the finest we have had - ever - in any country. Universally
    good, in our experience. We have had a couple of poor dining
    experiences, but that had nothing to do with the food: one dinner in
    Florence was poor due to the chain-smoking Japanese guys sitting at the
    table next to us - cannot figure why one would smoke *through* a meal.
    The other bad experience was a snooty staff at a restaurant in Bettona
    (in Umbria).

    >. The people are friendly.


    Very much so.

    - rick
     
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