Touring vs. Road

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Mark Henke, Jun 3, 2003.

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  1. Mark Henke

    Mark Henke Guest

    I am shopping for a new bike and I'd like to get some opinions. I already have a mountain bike (Trek
    6500) with some hybrid accents (upgraded Shimano gearing & slick tires), so I am looking for a
    road/touring bike. I am a 'big & tall' guy: 6'4" and 240lbs. (my mountain bike has suspension
    seatpost and fork) I am looking for something under $1500 that rides well and is comfortable. Those
    are my priorities.

    I have had some people say: 'get a chromoly frame, because it is more forgiving, and therefore
    more comfortable' and yet others say 'get an aluminum because the carbon fiber or chromoly will
    flex too much and you'll throw the chain a lot'. One pro shop recommended a road bike - the Trek
    1200c. Another pro shop recommended a touring bike - a Giant OCR Touring. Given my weight, the
    touring bike was recommended because of the wider tires, longer wheel base, and sitting more
    upright helps my back.

    The reason I am looking for a new bike is due to riding more. I love riding my mountain bike on
    gravel trails where I live. But I rode in a 50 mile charity ride this weekend on my mountain bike. I
    kept up with my team, but it was hard work. I am riding with the same team in a 150 mile ride in 2
    months. As I get more involved in long rides, the road/touring bike will get used more and more. I
    want to hae the new bike for the 150 mile ride. What do people think?
     
    Tags:


  2. Get a Fuji Tourer. Excellent bike, very comfortable over long distances, and well under $1,000. But
    if you are going to ride long distances, the last thing you need is an upright position - your butt
    will get extremely sore from the weight being concentrated on your sit-bones.
     
  3. Zeldabee

    Zeldabee Guest

    [email protected] (Mark Henke) wrote:
    > Given my weight, the touring bike was recommended because of the wider tires, longer wheel base,
    > and sitting more upright helps my back.

    A touring bike would be more comfortable and more sturdy. There's not all that much difference
    between how upright I am on my touring bike vs. my road bike, but there might be a bigger difference
    with some bikes. That can usually be tweaked, anyway. I think a touring bike is a good,
    middle-of-the-road choice, so to speak.

    --
    z e l d a b e e @ p a n i x . c o m http://NewsReader.Com/
     
  4. Kevin

    Kevin Guest

    Find a Trek 520 in a 25" frame and ride it. There are better and lesser bikes, and a whole list of
    recommendations and opinions. That's where I'd start.

    "Mark Henke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I am shopping for a new bike and I'd like to get some opinions. I already have a mountain bike
    > (Trek 6500) with some hybrid accents (upgraded Shimano gearing & slick tires), so I am looking for
    > a road/touring bike. I am a 'big & tall' guy: 6'4" and 240lbs. (my mountain bike has suspension
    > seatpost and fork) I am looking for something under $1500 that rides well and is comfortable.
    > Those are
     
  5. Arous

    Arous Guest

    Hi Mark,

    I own a 1997 (steel) Lemond and an older (aluminum) Raliegh road bikes...I'm 235lbs. and 6'...In all
    the years I've ridden my bikes, club rides, distance rides, commuting, etc. I've never noticed a
    problem with flexing on either bike. I'd say I ride both bikes each about 3,000 miles a year and the
    biggest difference I've noticed is that the LeMond is a softer ride.

    I have no special saddle on either bike and I can't think of any time when I've 'thrown' a chain on
    either bike, both have served me well.

    I have been thinking of retiring my Raliegh and I've been looking at a couple of Specialized Road
    bikes...The Sequoia (more my style) and the Sirrus (I believe more of what you're lookin' for)...

    http://www.specialized.com/sbcSSRoadBikes.jsp?my=2003

    I didn't care for any of the Trek Bicycle entries...but I know there are a lot of others out
    there...And, no, I don't work for Specialized...Like I said I don't even own one of there
    bikes...yet (maybe not at all).

    Cordially, Arous

    "Mark Henke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I am shopping for a new bike and I'd like to get some opinions. I already have a mountain bike
    > (Trek 6500) with some hybrid accents (upgraded Shimano gearing & slick tires), so I am looking for
    > a road/touring bike. I am a 'big & tall' guy: 6'4" and 240lbs. (my mountain bike has suspension
    > seatpost and fork) I am looking for something under $1500 that rides well and is comfortable.
    > Those are my priorities.
    >
    > I have had some people say: 'get a chromoly frame, because it is more forgiving, and therefore
    > more comfortable' and yet others say 'get an aluminum because the carbon fiber or chromoly will
    > flex too much and you'll throw the chain a lot'. One pro shop recommended a road bike - the Trek
    > 1200c. Another pro shop recommended a touring bike - a Giant OCR Touring. Given my weight, the
    > touring bike was recommended because of the wider tires, longer wheel base, and sitting more
    > upright helps my back.
    >
    > The reason I am looking for a new bike is due to riding more. I love riding my mountain bike on
    > gravel trails where I live. But I rode in a 50 mile charity ride this weekend on my mountain bike.
    > I kept up with my team, but it was hard work. I am riding with the same team in a 150 mile ride in
    > 2 months. As I get more involved in long rides, the road/touring bike will get used more and more.
    > I want to hae the new bike for the 150 mile ride. What do people think?
     
  6. Effi

    Effi Guest

    look at the distance between the top bar and the bottom bar where they meet on the front fork

    these are both about your size, and should be realtively inexpensive compared to what you've been
    looking at

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3611471154&category=7298 has incredible 36.5"
    standover height ! ! ! (height of top bar)

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3611324750 has 35" standover height

    "Mark Henke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I am shopping for a new bike and I'd like to get some opinions. I already have a mountain bike
    > (Trek 6500) with some hybrid accents (upgraded Shimano gearing & slick tires), so I am looking for
    > a road/touring bike. I am a 'big & tall' guy: 6'4" and 240lbs. (my mountain bike has suspension
    > seatpost and fork) I am looking for something under $1500 that rides well and is comfortable.
    > Those are my priorities.
    >
    > I have had some people say: 'get a chromoly frame, because it is more forgiving, and therefore
    > more comfortable' and yet others say 'get an aluminum because the carbon fiber or chromoly will
    > flex too much and you'll throw the chain a lot'. One pro shop recommended a road bike - the Trek
    > 1200c. Another pro shop recommended a touring bike - a Giant OCR Touring. Given my weight, the
    > touring bike was recommended because of the wider tires, longer wheel base, and sitting more
    > upright helps my back.
    >
    > The reason I am looking for a new bike is due to riding more. I love riding my mountain bike on
    > gravel trails where I live. But I rode in a 50 mile charity ride this weekend on my mountain bike.
    > I kept up with my team, but it was hard work. I am riding with the same team in a 150 mile ride in
    > 2 months. As I get more involved in long rides, the road/touring bike will get used more and more.
    > I want to hae the new bike for the 150 mile ride. What do people think?
     
  7. David Storm

    David Storm Guest

    I bought a Cannondale T2000 touring bike last summer and have used it for loaded touring with
    panniers and pulling a BOB trailer and for just road riding when other bike is in shop. I like the
    T2000 geometry and components (Shimano Ultegra STI shifters and XTR derailleur) and its only about
    4-5 pounds heavier than my "lightweight" road bike. Have also used as quasi MTB on unpaved roads
    using 32 tires. With larger 28-32 tires the ride is pretty bearable for aluminum. Paid $1400.

    "Mark Henke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I am shopping for a new bike and I'd like to get some opinions. I already have a mountain bike
    > (Trek 6500) with some hybrid accents (upgraded Shimano gearing & slick tires), so I am looking for
    > a road/touring bike. I am a 'big & tall' guy: 6'4" and 240lbs. (my mountain bike has suspension
    > seatpost and fork) I am looking for something under $1500 that rides well and is comfortable.
    > Those are my priorities.
    >
    > I have had some people say: 'get a chromoly frame, because it is more forgiving, and therefore
    > more comfortable' and yet others say 'get an aluminum because the carbon fiber or chromoly will
    > flex too much and you'll throw the chain a lot'. One pro shop recommended a road bike - the Trek
    > 1200c. Another pro shop recommended a touring bike - a Giant OCR Touring. Given my weight, the
    > touring bike was recommended because of the wider tires, longer wheel base, and sitting more
    > upright helps my back.
    >
    > The reason I am looking for a new bike is due to riding more. I love riding my mountain bike on
    > gravel trails where I live. But I rode in a 50 mile charity ride this weekend on my mountain bike.
    > I kept up with my team, but it was hard work. I am riding with the same team in a 150 mile ride in
    > 2 months. As I get more involved in long rides, the road/touring bike will get used more and more.
    > I want to hae the new bike for the 150 mile ride. What do people think?
     
  8. Effi

    Effi Guest

    another thing you could do is go to www.ebay.com , select smart search, put in road bike then
    specify the price range you want, like $0 to $200, or whatever, then search

    "Mark Henke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I am shopping for a new bike and I'd like to get some opinions. I already have a mountain bike
    > (Trek 6500) with some hybrid accents (upgraded Shimano gearing & slick tires), so I am looking for
    > a road/touring bike. I am a 'big & tall' guy: 6'4" and 240lbs. (my mountain bike has suspension
    > seatpost and fork) I am looking for something under $1500 that rides well and is comfortable.
    > Those are my priorities.
    >
    > I have had some people say: 'get a chromoly frame, because it is more forgiving, and therefore
    > more comfortable' and yet others say 'get an aluminum because the carbon fiber or chromoly will
    > flex too much and you'll throw the chain a lot'. One pro shop recommended a road bike - the Trek
    > 1200c. Another pro shop recommended a touring bike - a Giant OCR Touring. Given my weight, the
    > touring bike was recommended because of the wider tires, longer wheel base, and sitting more
    > upright helps my back.
    >
    > The reason I am looking for a new bike is due to riding more. I love riding my mountain bike on
    > gravel trails where I live. But I rode in a 50 mile charity ride this weekend on my mountain bike.
    > I kept up with my team, but it was hard work. I am riding with the same team in a 150 mile ride in
    > 2 months. As I get more involved in long rides, the road/touring bike will get used more and more.
    > I want to hae the new bike for the 150 mile ride. What do people think?
     
  9. [email protected] (Mark Henke) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    >> something under $1500 that rides well and is comfortable. Those
    are
    > my priorities.
    >
    I think there are many good choices under that limit.

    Touring bikes are inherently versatile, i.e. you can switch to narrower smoother tires and a
    closely-spaced cassette, take of the rack(s) and fenders, even lower the handlebars if you must.

    You may find Alex Wetmore's "touring bike" site useful.

    Articles at www.sheldonbrown.com on fit and everything else. www.rivendellbicycles.com has
    articles on fit ("Raise that stem") www.chainreactionbicycles.com has many articles including one
    on test riding.

    At some point you'll want to decide between barcons (bar end shifters and separate brake levers),
    Shimano STI, or Campagnolo ERGO combined brake-shift levers. The latter two are quite different
    in feel and operation, and both have advocates. IMO You really have to try all three options.

    IMO Campagnolo ERGO can be repaired (parts available) and the front shifter ratchets in small
    increments for precise trimming.

    My "touring" bike uses Shimano LX (ATB) hubs and cassette / derailleur. 135mm spacing may
    produce a stronger wheel, LX gives me an 11-32 cassette. At the front, it has Shimano 105 and
    30-42-52 chainrings (I'd prefer 26-36-46). SHimano 105 levers seem alright - mine have two
    positions for the center chainring, so I can choose whether the chain scrapes the inside or
    outside of the cage :)

    If there's a convenient Marinoni dealer, you can order a Turismo with your choice of Shimano or
    Campagnolo, and they used to make-to-measure for an extra C$100 or so. Takes a while to deliver,
    since it's made to order (like Heinz ketchup - the anticipation is half the pleasure).

    Tires do make an enormous difference.

    > >
    > The reason I am looking for a new bike is due to riding more. I love riding my mountain bike on
    > gravel trails where I live. But I rode in a 50 mile charity ride this weekend on my mountain bike.
    > I kept up with my team, but it was hard work. I am riding with the same team in a 150 mile ride in
    > 2 months. As I get more involved in long rides, the road/touring bike will get used more and more.
    > I want to hae the new bike for the 150 mile ride. What do people think?
     
  10. Steve

    Steve Guest

    The frame material is largely irrevelevant to ride quality, all things being equal, but some
    materials might last longer - Titanium being one, Steel the other, assuming you take care of it and
    keep the water out of it. Aluminum to date, has pretty much shown that a well designed and crafted
    frame can last a long time as well, and the juries still out on carbon as compared to the other
    materials.

    That said, the bike "for you" probably doesn't want to be the latest and most expensive
    lightweight road rocket of carbon/titanium/aluminum, compact geometry, etc.., but maybe not a full
    blown tourer either.

    I've used a tourer exclusively for longer non-loaded multi-day rides, and it worked just fine, but
    the type tends to be heavier then needed for the use as the beefier frame and fork is largely extra
    weight when not carrying loaded panniers.

    You probably want to look into a "sport tourer" - Specialized Sequoia being typical of the type.
    Triple chainring, more relaxed geometry, etc... Just stay away from the "boutique" wheels so common
    these days with 24 or so spokes.

    My first thought was and is a Rivendell Romulus - rivendellbicycles.com It's about in your price
    range, is designed for getting the handlebar at a comfortable height, has decent components and they
    will spend a good amount of time talking to you to make sure you get the right bike and the right
    fit. You may also want to consider trading up the rear wheel to their Bontrager Fairlane touring
    wheel for added strength. You can also order this bike from Sheldon at sheldonbrown.com and maybe
    think about having him trade up to STI if you want something more modern. Or look at the Rambouillet
    (basically the same bike but in a frame only version) and have them build it up from scratch.

    Also the Heron series from heronbicycles.com

    These are all bikes designed to allow you to do long distance rides in comfort, that will be riding
    10 years from now.

    Steve B.

    "Mark Henke" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    > I am shopping for a new bike and I'd like to get some opinions. I already have a mountain bike
    > (Trek 6500) with some hybrid accents (upgraded Shimano gearing & slick tires), so I am looking for
    > a road/touring bike. I am a 'big & tall' guy: 6'4" and 240lbs. (my mountain bike has suspension
    > seatpost and fork) I am looking for something under $1500 that rides well and is comfortable.
    > Those are my priorities.
    >
    > I have had some people say: 'get a chromoly frame, because it is more forgiving, and therefore
    > more comfortable' and yet others say 'get an aluminum because the carbon fiber or chromoly will
    > flex too much and you'll throw the chain a lot'. One pro shop recommended a road bike - the Trek
    > 1200c. Another pro shop recommended a touring bike - a Giant OCR Touring. Given my weight, the
    > touring bike was recommended because of the wider tires, longer wheel base, and sitting more
    > upright helps my back.
    >
    > The reason I am looking for a new bike is due to riding more. I love riding my mountain bike on
    > gravel trails where I live. But I rode in a 50 mile charity ride this weekend on my mountain bike.
    > I kept up with my team, but it was hard work. I am riding with the same team in a 150 mile ride in
    > 2 months. As I get more involved in long rides, the road/touring bike will get used more and more.
    > I want to hae the new bike for the 150 mile ride. What do people think?
     
  11. [email protected] (Mark Henke) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I am shopping for a new bike and I'd like to get some opinions. I already have a mountain bike
    > (Trek 6500) with some hybrid accents (upgraded Shimano gearing & slick tires), so I am looking for
    > a road/touring bike. I am a 'big & tall' guy: 6'4" and 240lbs. (my mountain bike has suspension
    > seatpost and fork) I am looking for something under $1500 that rides well and is comfortable.
    > Those are my priorities.
    >

    I am 5' 11", 235 lbs and my favourite bike is a 57 cm Jamis Aurora--a light tourer. Comfortable and
    affordable--and quite fast enough most of the time for me.

    As to frame material, I have no opinion, as that's a topic that's been cooked to death in this and
    other ng's over the years.

    A tourer is great in terms of total utility; fit sensible tires, fenders, racks...and go about
    your life.

    Jamis Aurora and Fuji Touring are nice tourers for the money. Look at the REI Randonee, which is
    apparently also good for the money. Towards the higher end of the tourer market, there's the Trek
    520...beyond that, well...

    -Luigi

    (BTW, in Britain it seems to be standard for touring bicycles to be sold complete--with racks and
    fenders and often also lights--which is a great way to sell a tourer. Why don't american
    manufacturers/shops do this?)
     
  12. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "Mark Henke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I am shopping for a new bike and I'd like to get some opinions. I already have a mountain bike
    > (Trek 6500) with some hybrid accents (upgraded Shimano gearing & slick tires), so I am looking for
    > a road/touring bike. I am a 'big & tall' guy: 6'4" and 240lbs. (my mountain bike has suspension
    > seatpost and fork) I am looking for something under $1500 that rides well and is comfortable.
    > Those are my priorities.
    >
    > I have had some people say: 'get a chromoly frame, because it is more forgiving, and therefore
    > more comfortable' and yet others say 'get an aluminum because the carbon fiber or chromoly will
    > flex too much and you'll throw the chain a lot'. One pro shop recommended a road bike - the Trek
    > 1200c. Another pro shop recommended a touring bike - a Giant OCR Touring. Given my weight, the
    > touring bike was recommended because of the wider tires, longer wheel base, and sitting more
    > upright helps my back.
    >
    > The reason I am looking for a new bike is due to riding more. I love riding my mountain bike on
    > gravel trails where I live. But I rode in a 50 mile charity ride this weekend on my mountain bike.
    > I kept up with my team, but it was hard work. I am riding with the same team in a 150 mile ride in
    > 2 months. As I get more involved in long rides, the road/touring bike will get used more and more.
    > I want to hae the new bike for the 150 mile ride. What do people think?

    Ignore all the crap about this and that wonder material. Steel bikes are excellent values and are
    generally repairable. Carbon and Titanium are inordinately expensive and Aluminum is reasonable but
    non-repairable. So, for a limited budget and the need for strength and durability, I'd vote for
    steel, and something towards touring geometry. Longer chainstays and wheelbases are your friends, as
    well as clearance for 28mm and larger tires. None of these features will slow you down.

    I ride a Cannondale T1000 and I can tell you that it rides beautifully, "even though it's an
    aluminum frame!". I've also ridden just every type of frame on the market, so I'm not just yacking
    up hairballs.

    --
    Robin Hubert <[email protected]
     
  13. On Tue, 03 Jun 2003 08:51:42 +0000, Mark Henke wrote:

    > am looking for something under $1500 that rides well and is comfortable. Those are my priorities.

    At that price range you will have a wide choice of nice bikes.
    >
    > I have had some people say: 'get a chromoly frame, because it is more forgiving, and therefore
    > more comfortable'

    Bull-puckie

    > and yet others say 'get an aluminum because the carbon fiber or chromoly will flex too much and
    > you'll throw the chain a lot'.

    Double bull-puckie.

    One pro shop recommended a road bike -
    > the Trek 1200c. Another pro shop recommended a touring bike - a Giant OCR Touring. Given my
    > weight, the touring bike was recommended because of the wider tires, longer wheel base, and
    > sitting more upright helps my back.

    Well, wider tires (with lots of spokes) is good, especially for someone over 200lbs. But sitting
    more upright is not necessarily good.

    It's like using software. Do you want something that is easy to learn how to use the first time, or
    something that is efficient and flexible, that will be useful for years? Upright seating feels
    better at first, but will not be over the long run. When you sit upright, about 75% of your weight
    is on your butt. The rest is supported by your legs. All that weight on those two little "sit-bones"
    is going to hurt, even with a miracle saddle. If you get a road-bike position with drop bars, about
    20% of your weight is supported by your arms. That is 20% less on the butt. It matters. At first
    your back will complain, but that will improve.

    There is a reason racers and long-distance tourists all use drop bars, and not upright bars. They
    are more comfortable over the long run.

    > a 50 mile charity ride this weekend on my mountain bike. I kept up with my team, but it was
    > hard work.

    I bet it was.

    > I am riding with the same team in a 150 mile ride in 2 months. As I get more involved in long
    > rides, the road/touring bike will get used more and more. I want to hae the new bike for the 150
    > mile ride. What do people think?

    Certainly, get either a road or touring bike. Don't be put off by the position on a drop-bar bike.
    Trust me, you will adjust to it. Make sure you can adjust the height of the bars, and start out with
    them fairly high, then lower it as your back eases into the idea. 150 miles on a mountain bike would
    be brutal.

    Mountain bikes are meant for off-road riding. They are not ideal for riding on roads. Road bikes, as
    the name implies, are. Touring bikes (with drop bars) are road bikes. Hybrids try to be all things
    to all people, and work as well as most compromises.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not _`\(,_ | certain, and as
    far as they are certain, they do not refer to (_)/ (_) | reality. -- Albert Einstein
     
  14. On Tue, 03 Jun 2003 08:51:42 +0000, Mark Henke wrote:

    By the way, I disagree with the advice to go to e-bay. You need to be fit to your bike. That is what
    a good bike shop will do (insist on it -- and not just stand-over-the-bar nonsense, either), but on
    e-bay? If you know what size you need, and know what you are getting, it could be a bargain. It can
    also be a rip-off.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | It doesn't get any easier, you just go faster. --Greg LeMond _`\(,_ | (_)/ (_) |
     
  15. Pbwalther

    Pbwalther Guest

    Well a touring bike is made for self contained trips or loaded touring. That means they expect
    people to hang panniers on it and 50 lbs of gear and go ride and camp from it. So a touring bike
    would certainly have no problem with your weight. However, I touring bike would not give you the
    performance that a road bike would. It will have a longer wheel base, lower gearing (for climbing
    hills whilst carrying a potload of gear), bigger tires, heavier wheels (not a bad thing for a big
    rider though).

    At you price point of $1,500 you have a lot of choices in bikes. I would recommend you get a bike
    equipped with Shimano 105 - which is a very good set of component that is not as expensive or quite
    as light at the top of the line stuff. I would suggest going towards a road bike rather then a
    touring bike. You already have a mountain bike that is sort of set up for road riding. A touring
    bike is not that different then your mountain bike. I would go more for the performance of the road
    bike. You might want to get a road bike that has a more relaxed geometry - could be a sport touring
    bike, century bike, or comfort bike (they keep calling these things different things).

    The frame materials are not that big a deal. They make perfectly good bikes out of steel, titanium,
    carbon fiber and aluminum. Geometry and fit are really more important considerations then frame
    material. The oversized aluminum tubes on the Cannondales are stiff and quite a few "weight
    challenged" riders like those. So you might give a 'dale a test ride.

    Don't get me wrong, a touring bike will give you more performance then your current ride. And
    touring bikes have very nice forgiving rides. It seemed to me that a road bike (racing bike) gives
    noticeably better performance. Depends on what you want. I would suggest getting the road or racing
    bike and just get one that is designed for having a nice ride vs all out performance.
     
  16. Steve

    Steve Guest

    "Robin Hubert" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    > Ignore all the crap about this and that wonder material. Steel bikes are excellent values and are
    > generally repairable. Carbon and Titanium are inordinately expensive

    Not that I'm recommending this particular frame for this purpose, but titanium frames have come
    down in price.

    http://www.titaniumsports.com/

    http://www.habcycles.com/

    The Habenaro custom frames are as cost effective as a Rivendell Rambouillet and it wouldn't surprise
    me if Mark can duplicate the geometry in a custom.

    Heron is also currently working on a titanium version as well,

    Steve B.
     
  17. Steve

    Steve Guest

    "Pbwalther" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    > Don't get me wrong, a touring bike will give you more performance then
    your
    > current ride. And touring bikes have very nice forgiving rides.

    Depends.

    A well designed tourer will have beefier tubing and a heavier fork. The result is the un-loaded ride
    can often be harsher then a road racing machine with skinny tires, if only due to the tubing used.
    My Miyata City Liner is a case in point in that even with an Avocet Cross 28mm tire at 90 psi, it
    has a very stiff fork that transmits a good deal more shock then the carbon fork on my Lemond or the
    lighter steel fork on my Heron.

    Steve B.
     
  18. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "Steve" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:F%[email protected]...
    > "Robin Hubert" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > > Ignore all the crap about this and that wonder material. Steel bikes
    are
    > > excellent values and are generally repairable. Carbon and Titanium are inordinately expensive
    >
    > Not that I'm recommending this particular frame for this purpose, but titanium frames have come
    > down in price.
    >
    > http://www.titaniumsports.com/
    >
    > http://www.habcycles.com/
    >
    > The Habenaro custom frames are as cost effective as a Rivendell
    Rambouillet
    > and it wouldn't surprise me if Mark can duplicate the geometry in a
    custom.
    >
    > Heron is also currently working on a titanium version as well,
    >

    You are correct but you must compare a Chinese made Reynolds 853 bike (like a KHS) with the Ti bike
    like the Habanero. How about the Surly Pacer ($399 frame/fork)?

    Mark Hickey must have some insight on this.

    Can y'all believe Waterford ("The Ride") is welding Titanium?

    --
    Robin Hubert <[email protected]
     
  19. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "Steve" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:F%[email protected]...
    > "Robin Hubert" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > > Ignore all the crap about this and that wonder material. Steel bikes
    are
    > > excellent values and are generally repairable. Carbon and Titanium are inordinately expensive
    >
    > Not that I'm recommending this particular frame for this purpose, but titanium frames have come
    > down in price.
    >
    > http://www.titaniumsports.com/
    >
    > http://www.habcycles.com/
    >
    > The Habenaro custom frames are as cost effective as a Rivendell
    Rambouillet
    > and it wouldn't surprise me if Mark can duplicate the geometry in a
    custom.
    >
    > Heron is also currently working on a titanium version as well,
    >

    You are correct but you must compare a Chinese made Reynolds 853 bike (like a KHS) with the Ti bike
    like the Habanero. How about the Surly Pacer ($399 frame/fork)?

    Mark Hickey must have some insight on this.

    Can y'all believe Waterford ("The Ride") is welding Titanium? I find it hard to believe that a Ti
    Heron will cost less than a Gunnar, despite the fact that prices are coming down.

    --
    Robin Hubert <[email protected]
     
  20. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "Steve" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:F%[email protected]...
    > "Robin Hubert" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > > Ignore all the crap about this and that wonder material. Steel bikes
    are
    > > excellent values and are generally repairable. Carbon and Titanium are inordinately expensive
    >
    > Not that I'm recommending this particular frame for this purpose, but titanium frames have come
    > down in price.
    >
    > http://www.titaniumsports.com/
    >
    > http://www.habcycles.com/
    >
    > The Habenaro custom frames are as cost effective as a Rivendell
    Rambouillet
    > and it wouldn't surprise me if Mark can duplicate the geometry in a
    custom.
    >
    > Heron is also currently working on a titanium version as well,
    >

    You are correct but you must compare a Chinese made Reynolds 853 bike (like a KHS) with the Ti bike
    like the Habanero. How about the Surly Pacer ($399 frame/fork)?

    Mark Hickey must have some insight on this.

    Can y'all believe Waterford ("The Ride") is welding Titanium? I find it hard to believe that a Ti
    Heron will cost less than a Gunnar, despite the fact that prices are coming down.

    --
    Robin Hubert <[email protected]
     
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