TR - Long Crag and Ros Castle (Cheviots) Marilyns



J

Jhimmy

Guest
It's only since the summer I've started to consider Marilyns as a challenge.
So, I've started on simple local hills for the winter. With nothing more
then the Marilyn tables, Anquet and a google I started todays run.

I googled "long Crag" but came up with nothing more the Ann Bowkers confused
description:-

http://www.personal.u-net.com/~keswick/maryl33.htm#long

Another link from a fell runner give me a clue as I looked at the map. I
drove north along the A697, about a kilometre past New Moor House, there's a
turn off, marked "Thrunton Wood". It's easy to see as here's a
telecommunication mast at this junction. 400 metres past the junction,
Thrunton Wood starts and immediately there's an access gate on the left.
Opposite the gate, there's room for about 10 cars to park. (NU092072)

I followed the excellent forestry track for about 2km. A small track at one
point went uphill, but had a sign on saying "Bee hives, use alternative
path" (this was the 2nd sign I saw with this on), I had a feeling this track
made it's way to Coe Crags. However, I followed the main track, which soon
split into 2. I followed the right hand side, going uphill ;-) This lead
to the col between Long Crag and Coe Crags.

Less then 10 minutes later I was standing on the top of Long Crag. It was
cold and clear with a good view of the Cheviots. 15 Minutes later I was on
Coe Crags.

It was a very simple Marilyn, ideal for a mountain biker or a passing
Munroist going to or from Scotland wishing to bag a Marilyn. Total time was
approx 2 hours.

------------------------------------------------------

After a short lunch in my car, I decided on a quick drive to my next
Marilyn, Ros Castle, next to Chillingham Castle. A small hamlet called
Hepburn, has a parking space 200 metres past it. This give fine views of
the eastern Cheviots. After I parked, I walked up a steep single tracked
road. A sign requested walkers to use the proper path to Ros castle, approx
200m from the top of the track, which I obliged for the simple reason that
there was no other path to follow.

This is where I could have kicked myself, there was loads of car parking
spaces right next to the strt of the path. Although, this wasn't clear on
the map as it shows a single tracked road. Park (NU079250).

Fron here, it must have taken about 10 minutes and I reached the top! The
easiest Marilyn anywhere? The views were sublime. Cheviots, North Sea,
castles and Holy island.

Both Ros Castle and Long Crag wouldn't have been climbed, or even known
about, if I hadn't started on the Marilyns. Good for her!


Jhimmy.
 
R

roger

Guest
The message <[email protected]>
from "Jhimmy" <[email protected]> contains these words:

> Fron here, it must have taken about 10 minutes and I reached the top! The
> easiest Marilyn anywhere?


No chance. There is one in Herefordshire (or thereabouts) that is just
the other side of a hedge from a public road. I don't know how hard the
hedge is to negotiate but ....

--
Roger Exiled in Essex looking North to the Water Tower, South
to the Tower on The Naze and East to the Roughs Tower.
 
J

Jhimmy

Guest
>>No chance. There is one in Herefordshire (or thereabouts) that is just
>>the other side of a hedge from a public road. I don't know how hard the
>>hedge is to negotiate but ....



Hopefully, I'll be passing there this summer, Roger, thanks for the tip :)

Jhimmy.
 
S

SteveO

Guest
On Tue, 28 Dec 2004 19:37:53 GMT, "Jhimmy" <[email protected]>
wrote:


>I googled "long Crag" but came up with nothing more the Ann Bowkers confused
>description:-
>
>http://www.personal.u-net.com/~keswick/maryl33.htm#long



>Less then 10 minutes later I was standing on the top of Long Crag. It was
>cold and clear with a good view of the Cheviots. 15 Minutes later I was on
>Coe Crags.


Nooooooooooo! don't do this, t'is heresy I implore thee!!!!

"Long Crag" dunt exist... I don't care who's list its on, it doesn't
exist!!! well, imho, o'course ;-)

What you describe is more universally known as Thrunton Crag, check
here:

http://www.thenmc.org.uk/pages/guide/index.htm

I'm sorry but you'll have to navigate vai Full List of Crags> Thrunton
Crag to find details because the guy who's done that part of the site
(via MySQL database.. nice work in itself) has done it in frames
<spit><spit> and I can't give you a better link than that. Have I
mentioned I hate frames on a web site??? <spit><spit>


....anyway, its not L**gC**g its Thrunton Crag :)


PS the guide page gives a grid ref so you should be able to see if it
corresponds.


PPS Thrunton Crag might not akshally be your Mary-thingy (is it the
season or summat?) but you can't call a summit a crag because it can't
be... a crag that is. Discuss.




SteveO
--
NE Climbers & walkers chat forum;
http://www.thenmc.org.uk/phpBB2/index.php

NMC website: http://www.thenmc.org.uk
 
R

RJ Webb

Guest

>No chance. There is one in Herefordshire (or thereabouts) that is just
>the other side of a hedge from a public road. I don't know how hard the
>hedge is to negotiate but ....


Very difficult.. The summit of Hegdon Hill is inside a secure
enclosure belonging to whatever company stole the gas board.

Mind the hedge is almost as high.....

Ruardean Hill is a village green. That is as easy as it gets.. ditto
the roadsider just north of Swansea.

Richard Webb
 
J

Judith

Guest
On Tue, 28 Dec 2004 19:37:53 GMT, "Jhimmy" <[email protected]>
wrote:

>
>I followed the excellent forestry track for about 2km. A small track at one
>point went uphill, but had a sign on saying "Bee hives, use alternative
>path" (this was the 2nd sign I saw with this on),



Interesting sign. Did you see any bees? I presume they're all
hibernating (or, more likely, dead) at this year.

Judith
 
S

Stuart

Guest
<SteveO> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> On Tue, 28 Dec 2004 19:37:53 GMT, "Jhimmy" <[email protected]>
> wrote:
>
>
> >I googled "long Crag" but came up with nothing more the Ann Bowkers

confused
> >description:-
> >
> >http://www.personal.u-net.com/~keswick/maryl33.htm#long

>
>
> >Less then 10 minutes later I was standing on the top of Long Crag. It was
> >cold and clear with a good view of the Cheviots. 15 Minutes later I was

on
> >Coe Crags.

>
> Nooooooooooo! don't do this, t'is heresy I implore thee!!!!
>
> "Long Crag" dunt exist... I don't care who's list its on, it doesn't
> exist!!! well, imho, o'course ;-)
>
> What you describe is more universally known as Thrunton Crag, check
> here:
>


Does the "Buttress of Perculiar Preversions" still exist ?
Routes that you may try once but never a second time!
 
J

Jhimmy

Guest
Sighty Crag's coming up in the spring, Richard. Still not sure to try it
from the Cumbrian side, or bike it through the Kielder end.

BTW, I've given up hope on different search engines. At the end of the day,
all I need is a slight bit of info to go on and I'll do the rest!


Jhimmy
 
J

Jhimmy

Guest
No bees, hornets, wasps or any flying insets. Too cold, it would have froze
their little wings off.


Jhimmy
 
W

W. D. Grey

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, Jhimmy
<[email protected]> writes
>>>No chance. There is one in Herefordshire (or thereabouts) that is just
>>>the other side of a hedge from a public road. I don't know how hard the
>>>hedge is to negotiate but ....

>
>
>Hopefully, I'll be passing there this summer, Roger, thanks for the tip :)
>
>Jhimmy.
>
>

Isn't there one on Mynydd Epynt - Roy Hill bagged it after a short walk
from his car.
--
Bill Grey
http://www.billboy.co.uk
 
R

RJ Webb

Guest
O
>Isn't there one on Mynydd Epynt - Roy Hill bagged it after a short walk
>from his car.


Its usually run.

The army chase you off that road just for parking.

In and out PDQ

Richard Webb
 
R

RJ Webb

Guest
On Wed, 29 Dec 2004 00:36:13 GMT, "Jhimmy" <[email protected]>
wrote:

>Sighty Crag's coming up in the spring, Richard. Still not sure to try it
>from the Cumbrian side, or bike it through the Kielder end.


Bike is useful from the Cumberland (Bewcastle) end too. Did not get
that far, but Christianbury crags is supposedly worth a visit. Looked
pretty interesting from afar.

Richard Webb
 
J

Jhimmy

Guest
! don't do this, t'is heresy I implore thee!!!!
>
> "Long Crag" dunt exist... I don't care who's list its on, it doesn't
> exist!!! well, imho, o'course ;-)
>
> What you describe is more universally known as Thrunton Crag, check
> here:



There you go, Steve, your mission in life - to change and alter all the
Marilyn details everwhere for Lonnggggg...(coughs)...er the hill formally
known as Long Crag.

Don't forget to tell the OS people, and Anquet and memory map and ......and
.... and....

One day you'll be thanked and all that hard work will be worth it ;-)


Jhimmy.
 
N

NewsReader

Guest
In message <[email protected]>,
[email protected]?.?.invalid writes
>On Tue, 28 Dec 2004 19:37:53 GMT, "Jhimmy" <[email protected]>
>wrote:
>
>>Less then 10 minutes later I was standing on the top of Long Crag. It was
>>cold and clear with a good view of the Cheviots. 15 Minutes later I was on
>>Coe Crags.

>
>Nooooooooooo! don't do this, t'is heresy I implore thee!!!!
>
>"Long Crag" dunt exist... I don't care who's list its on, it doesn't
>exist!!! well, imho, o'course ;-)
>
>What you describe is more universally known as Thrunton Crag, check
>here:
>
>http://www.thenmc.org.uk/pages/guide/index.htm
>

Just checked and the grid ref shown (NU074096) is indeed Thrunton Crag.
However browsing the OS map to the south end of Thrunton Woods shows
Long Crag at grid Ref NU063069.
According to the OS both do in fact exist.
--
Clelland Ferguson
 
J

Jhimmy

Guest
Those who live and work locally near Thrunton Crag will always have the
advantage to that name, unlike those (like myself) who go by the Marilyn
list.


Jhimmy.
 
A

AndyP

Guest
"RJ Webb" <[email protected]> wrote

> Ruardean Hill is a village green. That is as easy as it gets..


I made an intrepid ascent of Ruardean Hill by bike yesterday as it happens
because I wasn't sure I'd ever been to the summit before but apparently I
must have driven over it several times without realising.

Any would be baggers contemplating an ascent might like to do so dressed in
a bear costume shouting something along the lines of "Come and have a go if
you think you're hard enough" or "Who's the daddy?" in a French accent.
This might amuse the locals a bit depending on their sense of humour and
knowledge of Forest history.