TR - Sgurr nan Gillean

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by druidh, Jun 27, 2005.

  1. druidh

    druidh Guest

    Continuing my theme of bagging the Cuillin in small increments, it was
    the turn of Sgurr nan Gillean. Luckily, the midsummer weather in Skye
    was the same as last year - cloud just above the tops, broken by
    patches of blue. This was markedly better than it had been leaving
    Edinburgh earlier that morning and had improved even from the time we
    had pitched the tents in Portree. In fact when the sun broke through it
    was rather too warm. The start of the walk was delayed as we watched a
    yellow SAR helicopter land at the Sligachan MRT base. I wasn't quite
    sure how to view this - it seemed to have rather too many bad
    connotations. A quick skoosh of suncream and Avon SSS and we were off.

    The route up to the ridge from Sligachan is pretty obvious and is now
    well surfaced. Fast, easy progress was possible and I managed to "bag"
    Skye's only Geocache en route. The route up the side of Coire Riabhach
    was a bit loose in places, boulders overlying scree isn't the most
    secure surface and at times we had to go up one at a time to avoid any
    rockfall risk. On reaching the ridge, the views across the whole of the
    Cuillin opened up and it was possible to make out the shapes of other
    walkers and climbers dotted around the skyline. The view from here to
    the summit of Gillean was suitably daunting and wasn't improved by
    seeing the speed at which some people were descending. Frankly, they
    seemed to be taking forever over some of the rocky steps.

    Anyway - no time to daunder, so up we went. The first section was easy
    enough, but we soon hit a small chimney which required a bit of stretch
    to exit. Along a little ledge and we were under some large, sloping
    boulders which we had to ascend directly. Being basalt, they didn't
    have quite the sure-footed feel of gabbro and we were glad that it was
    a dry day. A couple of other steps up and we were soon on the very
    summit ridge, with it's little rocky steps and narrow "pinched" ridge.
    The summit was a bit larger than I'd been led to believe and were able
    to relax and watch groups ascending Am Basteir (which looks *really*
    scary from here!) The views were great - at this time of year, it can
    get a bit hazy, but today we could see a long, long way.

    Then it was time to go. The slopy boulders proved to be no more
    difficult in descent and the biggest concern was re-applying the
    anti-midge as they'd now caught up with us. There was a brief
    discussion about going on to the lower peaks along the ridge (Sgurr
    Beag and Sgurr na-h Uamha), but that was soon cut short by mention of
    curry and beer in Portree!




    druidh
     
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  2. theo

    theo Guest

    "druidh" <[email protected]> schreef in bericht
    news:[email protected]
    > Continuing my theme of bagging the Cuillin in small increments, it was
    > the turn of Sgurr nan Gillean. Luckily, the midsummer weather in Skye
    > was the same as last year - cloud just above the tops, broken by
    > patches of blue. This was markedly better than it had been leaving
    > Edinburgh earlier that morning and had improved even from the time we
    > had pitched the tents in Portree. In fact when the sun broke through it
    > was rather too warm. The start of the walk was delayed as we watched a
    > yellow SAR helicopter land at the Sligachan MRT base. I wasn't quite
    > sure how to view this - it seemed to have rather too many bad
    > connotations. A quick skoosh of suncream and Avon SSS and we were off.
    >
    > The route up to the ridge from Sligachan is pretty obvious and is now
    > well surfaced. Fast, easy progress was possible and I managed to "bag"
    > Skye's only Geocache en route. The route up the side of Coire Riabhach
    > was a bit loose in places, boulders overlying scree isn't the most
    > secure surface and at times we had to go up one at a time to avoid any
    > rockfall risk. On reaching the ridge, the views across the whole of the
    > Cuillin opened up and it was possible to make out the shapes of other
    > walkers and climbers dotted around the skyline. The view from here to
    > the summit of Gillean was suitably daunting and wasn't improved by
    > seeing the speed at which some people were descending. Frankly, they
    > seemed to be taking forever over some of the rocky steps.
    >
    > Anyway - no time to daunder, so up we went. The first section was easy
    > enough, but we soon hit a small chimney which required a bit of stretch
    > to exit. Along a little ledge and we were under some large, sloping
    > boulders which we had to ascend directly. Being basalt, they didn't
    > have quite the sure-footed feel of gabbro and we were glad that it was
    > a dry day. A couple of other steps up and we were soon on the very
    > summit ridge, with it's little rocky steps and narrow "pinched" ridge.
    > The summit was a bit larger than I'd been led to believe and were able
    > to relax and watch groups ascending Am Basteir (which looks *really*
    > scary from here!) The views were great - at this time of year, it can
    > get a bit hazy, but today we could see a long, long way.
    >
    > Then it was time to go. The slopy boulders proved to be no more
    > difficult in descent and the biggest concern was re-applying the
    > anti-midge as they'd now caught up with us. There was a brief
    > discussion about going on to the lower peaks along the ridge (Sgurr
    > Beag and Sgurr na-h Uamha), but that was soon cut short by mention of
    > curry and beer in Portree!


    I followed almost the same route a couple years ago. Went too far to the
    right at the steepest part of the ridge and felt more like a fly walking on
    a straight wall. The summit was in clouds and felt like a *magic carpet
    floating in the air*. As soon as the sky cleared that feeling disappeared.
    My oldest son (6) is called Gillean and his character is like the mountain
    itself.

    --
    Theo
    www.theosphotos.fotopic.net
     
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