TR: URW Mini-Expedition. Capel Curig.

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Judith, Dec 27, 2005.

  1. Phil Cook wrote:

    > This was a decent sized bowl of chips and in addition to the bread it
    > probably /was/ overdoing it.


    Throw the bread away and just eat the chips!

    Paul
     


  2. Fran

    Fran Guest

    [email protected] said...
    > A small group of URW-ers (Me, Phil C, Fran, Thomas (Fran's son)) met
    > up at Bryn Tyrch campsite on Boxing Day. I believe that the usual URW
    > Expedition campsite is Dol Gam and I wouldn't recommend that we moved
    > to Bryn Tyrch unless we decided to use the bunkhouses. The camping
    > field was tiny and uneven but plenty big enough for the 4 of us.


    Judith's not the only one who got carried away with her TR:

    Thomas (who's a couple of months off 11) and I drove up on Christmas
    day, as soon as it became apparent that I wasn't destined for the
    divorce court if I deserted the family. We left at around 16:00, having
    watched Murder On The Orient Express before we did. The drive up was
    lovely, with hardly any traffic about - but with the attendant problem
    that there was very little to guage my speed by other than by constantly
    checking the speedometer... which very nearly turned out to be slightly
    more than unfortunate. Who on earth left a railway bridge (with right-
    angled bends each side of it) in the middle of the road? Thankfully I
    managed to miss the bridge, but the noise the tyres made was
    spectacular. "Do it again, Mum!" "Not <shiver> likely <shake>" The
    rest of the journey was without incident and we arrived at the campsite
    at about 20:00 in pitch blackness. As we drove into the farmyard four
    dogs (thankfully all chained) announced our presence to everyone within
    about 60 miles. Great. "Shut up you lot", I ordered them. Then I
    tried it in Welsh, to see if that made any difference. It didn't.

    I'd missed Phil's post saying that he would be arriving on Boxing day,
    so when I didn't see his tent I wondered at first if I was in the right
    place; however the presence of the Bryn Tyrch Hotel more or less next
    door to the farm and that of the YHA hostel gave me confidence and I
    drove into a small field to find somewhere to pitch two small tents. It
    was chilly, but not unreasonably so, and Thomas and I got our tents
    pitched fairly quickly. He had a PA1; I had the red Wild Country 2-man
    tent I bought from someone here a couple of years back. Both tents are
    a pleasure to pitch because they're so easy, and the Wild Country tent
    even has a useable porch. It's small for two people, but fabulously
    roomy for one, which is how I prefer to use it.

    I boiled up some water and made hot chocolate for us both, after which
    we turned in and were tucked up snug as bugs in rugs by about 22:00. I
    was using my silk sleeping bag liner (from Lidl, where else) inside my
    normal 3-season sleeping bag, and because I was expecting to be cold I
    had a fleece bag around the outside of the sleeping bag. Thomas had
    more or less the same arrangement, but without the silk liner. I went
    to bed wearing only a T-shirt, and to my amazement I slept right through
    the night, not waking up until about 07:00 - and that was only for a
    'comfort break'. Thomas seemed to be still in the land of nod, so I
    climbed back into my sack and slept for another couple of hours.

    Breakfast was a sort of hot muesli and more hot chocolate, accompanied
    by the whinneying of mine host's new acquisition (a pony for his
    grandson) and the barking of the four dogs. We passed the time of day
    with mine host, and I practiced my Welsh. He (a former shepherd in his
    70s or even older) was thrilled to bits that an adult was taking the
    trouble to learn the language, and told me not to pay until I'd decided
    how many nights I was staying.

    There was still no sign of anyone else apart from another camper in the
    main field, so after a good hot meal Thomas and I headed into Betws y
    Coed to see what shops were open. We subsequently treated ourselves to
    new gloves, some socks, toothbrushes and a tube of tooth paste (there's
    always something I manage to forget to pack). We were also accosted by
    Judith, who had seen us wandering along the pavement and had stopped to
    say hello. She then went on to the campsite; we carried on window
    shopping and drooling over all the stuff on our wish-lists. When we
    finally got back to the campsite Judith had pitched her tent (another
    PA1) and gone off for a stroll somewhere. Not long after our return
    Phil turned up, and that was when I discovered that of the three maps of
    Snowdonia Charlie had put in the car not one covered the area we were
    in. Oh great :-(

    Phil came to the rescue however, and suggested a 4 mile bimble, which we
    did. It started by going UP, and I started to wonder what on earth I
    was doing there. Never mind, the path soon levelled out, and I was more
    or less able to keep up with Phil for the remainder of the walk. Of
    course, it helped enormously that he slowed down for me...

    Shortly after our return to the campsite Judith turned up, and we spent
    some time wondering what to do. Judith had discovered that the Bryn
    Tyrch Hotel was closed until the next day, but Phil and I had passed a
    rather nice looking pub/hotel down the road a bit that looked as if it
    were open. It turned out that this was indeed the case, so to Cobden's
    we went, to await the time when they started to serve evening meals.

    Cobden's is recommended, but it's not the cheapest place around. It
    was, however, the only place open, and has what appears to be its own
    ale (Cobden's Ale), which was very quaffable. Not wanting to have to
    leave my tent in the night however, I limited my liquid intake to just
    two halves...

    We emerged to darkness and a cloudless sky. Oh joy. It was going to be
    one cold night :-( I added a sweatshirt to my nightly attire, and
    woke up at about 08:00 to discover that my flysheet was rock hard, just
    through frost. I also discovered that those lovely big blue gas
    cylinders don't like the cold, so I was forced to use my meths burning
    not-Trangia to boil the water for breakfast and hot choc. It took
    *ages*. Has anyone got a photo of a Trangia in action, or better yet in
    stages of being prepared for use, that can go up on a website? If I can
    compare the two stoves I might be able to make mine more efficient.

    By the time I'd donned two pairs of thick socks, t-shirt, microfleece,
    two sweatshirts, gloves and ear warmers I was still too cold to
    contemplate doing much more than sitting in a warm cafe somewhere.
    Thomas had been horrified to discover that the previous day's walk was
    merely a warm up for the 'real thing', and didn't really want to walk
    far, so we decided to let Phil and Judith carry on without us. They
    eventually left, and Thomas and I went to pay our dues with the campsite
    owner - who invited us in to share choccy fingers and a tot of whisky
    with his visiting friend. How could we refuse? Well quite. So we
    didn't. I mean, it would've been rude, wouldn't it...

    We started for home soon after, and finally thawed out just south of
    Rhayader when we found an open cafe and got some hot food and drink
    inside us. I even managed to shed a sweatshirt and a pair of socks!

    I was a bit cold still for most of yesterday, but today I'm awake and
    raring to go, so I'll probably nip out for a bit shortly. Meanwhile,
    here is a selection of crap photos:

    http://frances.fotopic.net/c808781.html

    --
    To reply see 'from' in headers; lose the domain, and insert dots and @
    where common sense dictates.
     
  3. Phil Cook

    Phil Cook Guest

    Paul Saunders wrote:

    >Phil Cook wrote:
    >
    >> This was a decent sized bowl of chips and in addition to the bread it
    >> probably /was/ overdoing it.

    >
    >Throw the bread away and just eat the chips!


    Funny you should say that.... :)
    --
    Phil Cook looking north over the park to the "Westminster Gasworks"
     
  4. Phil Cook wrote:

    >> Throw the bread away and just eat the chips!

    >
    > Funny you should say that.... :)


    I'll have a halloumi bruschetta please, with extra veg and chips. Oh and
    leave out the cheese and bread...

    Paul
     
  5. Paul Rooney

    Paul Rooney Guest

    On Thu, 29 Dec 2005 07:43:11 GMT, Craig Oldfield
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    >[email protected] says...
    >> On Wed, 28 Dec 2005 22:35:09 +0000, Judith
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> <snip>
    >> >Women's/short-length.

    >> <snip>
    >>
    >> I would have liked to be there, but I've been away on a mission (-:
    >>

    >Shitting on somebody's front lawn perhaps?



    In a metaphorical sense, I suppose that's right (-:

    --

    Paul Rooney
     
  6. Neil Barker

    Neil Barker Guest

  7. Judith

    Judith Guest

    On Thu, 29 Dec 2005 09:49:16 +0000, SteveO wrote:

    >Thanks for the [TR] Judith, enjoyed reading it :)


    Cheers. I like writing them ...... but I seem to miss out all the
    "exciting" stuff about the actual walk and just dwell on getting cold
    hands and worrying about pubs being shut. Hm? Perhaps I have my
    priorities right after all!

    Judith
     
  8. Judith

    Judith Guest

    On Thu, 29 Dec 2005 14:52:31 -0000, Fran
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >
    >Breakfast was a sort of hot muesli and more hot chocolate, accompanied
    >by the whinneying of mine host's new acquisition (a pony for his
    >grandson)


    That pony made my finger bleed! (I caught it on barbed wire whilst
    stroking the pony's nose.)

    > and the barking of the four dogs. We passed the time of day
    >with mine host, and I practiced my Welsh. He (a former shepherd in his
    >70s or even older) was thrilled to bits that an adult was taking the
    >trouble to learn the language, and told me not to pay until I'd decided
    >how many nights I was staying.


    Perhaps I should have at least tried the little Welsh I know. Dim
    parcio!

    > When we
    >finally got back to the campsite Judith had pitched her tent (another
    >PA1) and gone off for a stroll somewhere.


    I realised, later, that this may have been very rude of me! I thought
    that Phil was going to do a walk and then come to the campsite, so I
    thought I may as well leave you to your shopping and then meet up with
    the 3 of you later. I would have joined you on your bimble if I'd
    realised he was coming straight to the campsite.


    >
    >We emerged to darkness and a cloudless sky. Oh joy. It was going to be
    >one cold night :-(


    I had my own private Aurora Borealis in the tent. I stayed fulled
    dressed until I had rearranged all my stuff around me, in the dark, in
    the tent. I kept seeing flashes of light, which I took to be the
    luminous hands of my watch. However, I then realised that I had
    already taken off my watch! It was the static electricity in my
    fleece pullover. Once I had realised what was happening I was able to
    put on quite a show ....... until I wondered if I might set fire to
    the PA1, so I stopped larking about and went to bed.

    > I added a sweatshirt to my nightly attire, and
    >woke up at about 08:00 to discover that my flysheet was rock hard, just
    >through frost. I also discovered that those lovely big blue gas
    >cylinders don't like the cold


    Neither do nearly empty backpacking propane/butane canisters which I'd
    been keeping for car camping. Perhaps *summer* car camping would be a
    better idea, although wrapping my hands round the cannister did make a
    big difference.

    >Thomas had been horrified to discover that the previous day's walk was
    >merely a warm up for the 'real thing', and didn't really want to walk
    >far, so we decided to let Phil and Judith carry on without us. They
    >eventually left, and Thomas and I went to pay our dues with the campsite
    >owner - who invited us in to share choccy fingers and a tot of whisky
    >with his visiting friend. How could we refuse? Well quite. So we
    >didn't. I mean, it would've been rude, wouldn't it...


    Quite right, too. However, you do have my mobile phone number and I
    could so easily have come back to the campsite. I hope I didn't
    offend the proprietor.

    Judith
     
  9. W. D. Grey

    W. D. Grey Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Fran
    <[email protected]> writes
    >[email protected] said...
    >> A small group of URW-ers (Me, Phil C, Fran, Thomas (Fran's son)) met
    >> up at Bryn Tyrch campsite on Boxing Day. I believe that the usual URW
    >> Expedition campsite is Dol Gam and I wouldn't recommend that we moved
    >> to Bryn Tyrch unless we decided to use the bunkhouses. The camping
    >> field was tiny and uneven but plenty big enough for the 4 of us.

    >
    >Judith's not the only one who got carried away with her TR:

    Lovely TR snipped......

    Thanks Fran, enjoyed that! Nice photos too.
    --
    Bill Grey
    http://www.billboy.co.uk
     
  10. Judith

    Judith Guest

    On Thu, 29 Dec 2005 12:19:35 -0000, "Paul Saunders"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >>> This is not a criticism

    >>
    >> Oh, no? ;-)

    >
    >No, similar things have happened to me. I've arranged rendezvous with
    >people and failed to meet up with them.


    Er, yes, that was *me*, Paul!


    >>> What's the difference?

    >>
    >> Vegan is a stricter form of Vegetarian. No animal products are eaten;
    >> so no milk, no honey, no cheese, no yoghurt etc. Flipping difficult
    >> if you ask me.

    >
    >Ah, so you're not one of those then?
    >

    No. I suppose I could cater for myself OK but I spend a lot of time
    away from home and can just about get by as a Veggie ["Oooh, yes, an
    omelette would be fine, thank you"] but to be a proper Vegan I'd spend
    all of my time worrying about food.


    Judith
     
  11. Judith

    Judith Guest

    On Thu, 29 Dec 2005 15:29:03 +0000, Phil Cook
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >>> This was a decent sized bowl of chips and in addition to the bread it
    >>> probably /was/ overdoing it.

    >>
    >>Throw the bread away and just eat the chips!

    >
    >Funny you should say that.... :)



    Well it was a HUGE piece of bread. There was no way I could manage it
    ..... especially with chips going begging.

    Judith
     
  12. SteveO

    SteveO Guest

    On Thu, 29 Dec 2005 19:36:27 +0000, Judith
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Thu, 29 Dec 2005 09:49:16 +0000, SteveO wrote:
    >
    >>Thanks for the [TR] Judith, enjoyed reading it :)

    >
    >Cheers. I like writing them ...... but I seem to miss out all the
    >"exciting" stuff about the actual walk and just dwell on getting cold
    >hands and worrying about pubs being shut. Hm?


    Hm, I prefer the human-aspect [TR]s


    >Perhaps I have my priorities right after all!


    yup, seems that way to me :)



    --
    SteveO
     
  13. Fran

    Fran Guest

    [email protected] said...
    > > When we
    > >finally got back to the campsite Judith had pitched her tent (another
    > >PA1) and gone off for a stroll somewhere.

    >
    > I realised, later, that this may have been very rude of me!
    >

    Not at all! You wanted to get to the campsite and get sorted out there,
    and you quite rightly wanted a bimble. You had no idea how long we were
    going to be, and neither did I, so waiting for us could have been a
    complete waste of time.

    > >We emerged to darkness and a cloudless sky. Oh joy. It was going to be
    > >one cold night :-(

    >
    > I had my own private Aurora Borealis in the tent.


    I /beg/ your pardon??

    > I stayed fulled
    > dressed until I had rearranged all my stuff around me, in the dark, in
    > the tent. I kept seeing flashes of light, which I took to be the
    > luminous hands of my watch. However, I then realised that I had
    > already taken off my watch! It was the static electricity in my
    > fleece pullover. Once I had realised what was happening I was able to
    > put on quite a show ....... until I wondered if I might set fire to
    > the PA1, so I stopped larking about and went to bed.


    Oh, I see! </relief>

    > >I also discovered that those lovely big blue gas
    > >cylinders don't like the cold

    >
    > Neither do nearly empty backpacking propane/butane canisters which I'd
    > been keeping for car camping. Perhaps *summer* car camping would be a
    > better idea, although wrapping my hands round the cannister did make a
    > big difference.


    Annoying, wasn't it :-(

    > >Thomas and I went to pay our dues with the campsite
    > >owner - who invited us in to share choccy fingers and a tot of whisky
    > >with his visiting friend. How could we refuse? Well quite. So we
    > >didn't. I mean, it would've been rude, wouldn't it...

    >
    > Quite right, too. However, you do have my mobile phone number and I
    > could so easily have come back to the campsite. I hope I didn't
    > offend the proprietor.
    >

    <g> I'll bear that in mind for next time we find ourselves in the
    middle of nowhere at Christmas or new year :)

    --
    To reply see 'from' in headers; lose the domain, and insert dots and @
    where common sense dictates.
     
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