Track bike help

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by [email protected], Mar 19, 2006.

  1. Hi, I got the wheels set for my track bike figured out. I got a nice
    27" front and either a quick release or solid axle rear wheel. The
    problem is now in the cog. I found this cog on Ebay and was wondering
    if it could work with my rear hub. Both of the wheels quick release and
    solid are almost identical.I am gonna with help rework either rear
    wheel...new spokes, etc. Im pretty sure it can work but I wanted to
    make sure. Below I linked the ebay ad and a pic of the quick release
    wheel. Thanks so much

    http://img387.imageshack.us/my.php?image=dscf01457cn.jpg


    http://cgi.ebay.com/Track-Cog-18T-New_W0QQitemZ7226850872QQcategoryZ42319QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem
     
    Tags:


  2. Vee

    Vee Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Hi, I got the wheels set for my track bike figured out. I got a nice
    > 27" front and either a quick release or solid axle rear wheel. The
    > problem is now in the cog. I found this cog on Ebay and was wondering
    > if it could work with my rear hub. Both of the wheels quick release and
    > solid are almost identical.I am gonna with help rework either rear
    > wheel...new spokes, etc. Im pretty sure it can work but I wanted to
    > make sure. Below I linked the ebay ad and a pic of the quick release
    > wheel. Thanks so much
    >
    > http://img387.imageshack.us/my.php?image=dscf01457cn.jpg
    >
    >
    > http://cgi.ebay.com/Track-Cog-18T-New_W0QQitemZ7226850872QQcategoryZ42319QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem


    The ebay cog is compatible with your hub. You may want to loctite the
    sucker on there, and secure it with a lockring from an old adjustable
    cup bottom bracket (ask your local bike shop for one).

    It's better to use a real track hub than your conventional freewheel
    hub for a number of reasons, but your setup will work as long as you
    have at least a front brake.

    See: http://sheldonbrown.com/fixed-conversion.html#freewheelhub for
    more info.

    -Vee
     
  3. yes..my mechanic friend is gonna help with alignment and other such
    stuff. Will do with the bottom brack cup. Thanks!!!
     
  4. <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > yes..my mechanic friend is gonna help with alignment and other such
    > stuff. Will do with the bottom brack cup. Thanks!!!
    >


    Although it may work on your hub, you do not have a hub that is threaded so
    that you can use it with the lockring on it.
    With a fixed cog and no freewheel, you run a considerable risk of the cog
    unscrewing on you if you reverse pedal or use the pedals to brake or slow
    down.
    It is very dangerous when this happens.

    For example, check out the White Industries Fixed and Free flip flop hub
    here.
    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/singlespeed.html#hubs
    You'll note that it has the threaded section for the rear cog, and a reverse
    threaded portion for the lockring. What that does is prevent the rear cog
    from unscrewing on you when you reverse pedal or brake using your pedals. It
    is very dangerous to have the cog unscrew on you.

    Now you might be able to use some serious locktite to glue the rear cog onto
    the hub. But as I see it, it will be really hard to get it off later, and
    unless you get it torqued down hard before the locktite sets, it may still
    unscrew on you anyway, if you try to lock up the rear wheel using the
    pedals.

    Now if you are using a freewheel BMX type of cog, no problems at all.
     
  5. [email protected] wrote:

    > Hi, I got the wheels set for my track bike figured out. I got a nice
    > 27" front and either a quick release or solid axle rear wheel. The
    > problem is now in the cog. I found this cog on Ebay and was wondering
    > if it could work with my rear hub. Both of the wheels quick release and
    > solid are almost identical.I am gonna with help rework either rear
    > wheel...new spokes, etc. Im pretty sure it can work but I wanted to
    > make sure. Below I linked the ebay ad and a pic of the quick release
    > wheel. Thanks so much


    A proper track hub has a left hand thread for a lockring, which more or
    less guarantees that the sprocket will never come undone under
    pedal-braking. If you fit it with the mother of all chainwhips (I made
    my own 2 foot 1/8" chainwhip for about 3UKP) this is pretty unlikely
    anyway, and many fixed riders believe it's safer not to have a lockring
    in case the chain comes off. Personally I do use a lockring and my
    chain won't come off because it's straight and tight.

    The cog looks a bit like a Cyclo. If so, they are cheap and crudely cut
    (not machined properly), with very shallow threads. OK for a beater,
    but you wouldn't want one on a nice track hub.

    But the short answer to your question is yes, they will work OK together.
     
  6. Yeah the cog I dont think Im gonna buy. It is kind of overpriced and
    not good quality. I am thinking about a dura ace one. Shimano makes
    excellent items. Thanks


    Zog The Undeniable wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > > Hi, I got the wheels set for my track bike figured out. I got a nice
    > > 27" front and either a quick release or solid axle rear wheel. The
    > > problem is now in the cog. I found this cog on Ebay and was wondering
    > > if it could work with my rear hub. Both of the wheels quick release and
    > > solid are almost identical.I am gonna with help rework either rear
    > > wheel...new spokes, etc. Im pretty sure it can work but I wanted to
    > > make sure. Below I linked the ebay ad and a pic of the quick release
    > > wheel. Thanks so much

    >
    > A proper track hub has a left hand thread for a lockring, which more or
    > less guarantees that the sprocket will never come undone under
    > pedal-braking. If you fit it with the mother of all chainwhips (I made
    > my own 2 foot 1/8" chainwhip for about 3UKP) this is pretty unlikely
    > anyway, and many fixed riders believe it's safer not to have a lockring
    > in case the chain comes off. Personally I do use a lockring and my
    > chain won't come off because it's straight and tight.
    >
    > The cog looks a bit like a Cyclo. If so, they are cheap and crudely cut
    > (not machined properly), with very shallow threads. OK for a beater,
    > but you wouldn't want one on a nice track hub.
    >
    > But the short answer to your question is yes, they will work OK together.
     
  7. [email protected] wrote:

    >Hi, I got the wheels set for my track bike figured out. I got a nice
    >27" front and either a quick release or solid axle rear wheel. The
    >problem is now in the cog. I found this cog on Ebay and was wondering
    >if it could work with my rear hub. Both of the wheels quick release and
    >solid are almost identical.I am gonna with help rework either rear
    >wheel...new spokes, etc. Im pretty sure it can work but I wanted to
    >make sure. Below I linked the ebay ad and a pic of the quick release
    >wheel. Thanks so much
    >
    >http://img387.imageshack.us/my.php?image=dscf01457cn.jpg
    >
    >
    >http://cgi.ebay.com/Track-Cog-18T-New_W0QQitemZ7226850872QQcategoryZ42319QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem
    >
    >
    >

    One thing to consider about a "track bike" -- if you're going to use it
    in a race at a track, the bicycle cannot have a quick release on it.
    (See USCF Rulebook for 2006.) This would be a "good sense" rule if you
    are just riding, not racing, at a track.

    This is because of the (not so remote?) chance that your wheel might
    come in contact with another wheel, and the quick release might catch on
    the other wheel, perhaps opening the quick release and likely tearing
    out spokes on the other wheel. QR's are allowed in events where only
    one bike is on the track at a time.
     
  8. On Sun, 19 Mar 2006 08:08:23 -0800, 24inchdubs wrote:

    > Hi, I got the wheels set for my track bike figured out. I got a nice
    > 27" front and either a quick release or solid axle rear wheel. The
    > problem is now in the cog. I found this cog on Ebay and was wondering
    > if it could work with my rear hub.


    It will work with the pictured hub, as well as any would. However, no way
    this is worth $14.25. It is a relatively cheap sprocket. For that kind
    of money, used, I'd expect Campy. You can get these at swap meets for $5
    or less; I have done so several times.

    The wheel is no great shakes, either. It is not really meant for fixed
    gear riding. For $20 or so you can get a new hub that is meant for fixed
    gear, with a lockring. Better idea. Check Harris Cyclery for details.

    BTW, there is nothing wrong with using QR axles on a fixed gear. That's
    what I do, and it saves hassles and the need to carry a wrench.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Some people used to claim that, if enough monkeys sat in front
    _`\(,_ | of enough typewriters and typed long enough, eventually one of
    (_)/ (_) | them would reproduce the collected works of Shakespeare. The
    internet has proven this not to be the case.
     
  9. On Sun, 19 Mar 2006 16:14:00 -0800, Colin Campbell wrote:

    > One thing to consider about a "track bike" -- if you're going to use it
    > in a race at a track, the bicycle cannot have a quick release on it.
    > (See USCF Rulebook for 2006.) This would be a "good sense" rule if you
    > are just riding, not racing, at a track.
    >
    > This is because of the (not so remote?) chance that your wheel might
    > come in contact with another wheel, and the quick release might catch on
    > the other wheel, perhaps opening the quick release and likely tearing
    > out spokes on the other wheel. QR's are allowed in events where only
    > one bike is on the track at a time.


    While it is true that this is a rule, it is nonsense. Why is there no
    such rule for road races, if it is so dangerous? In a crit,
    anyone who flats is out of the race, anyway, so the need for a
    fast tire change is questionable. Actually, the rule is there not for
    that purpose, and not for quick-releases. It is a holdover of a rule
    aimed at old-fashioned wing-nuts, which because of their flanges could and
    did hurt people in crashes. They were allowed on road races (few crits
    back then), but were a hazard even there.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | And what if you track down these men and kill them, what if you
    _`\(,_ | killed all of us? From every corner of Europe, hundreds,
    (_)/ (_) | thousands would rise up to take our places. Even Nazis can't
    kill that fast. -- Paul Henreid (Casablanca).
     
  10. On Sun, 19 Mar 2006 12:10:23 -0600, Earl Bollinger wrote:

    > Although it may work on your hub, you do not have a hub that is threaded so
    > that you can use it with the lockring on it.
    > With a fixed cog and no freewheel, you run a considerable risk of the cog
    > unscrewing on you if you reverse pedal or use the pedals to brake or slow
    > down.
    > It is very dangerous when this happens.


    Come on. Don't overstate this. A cog that has been on and used for a
    while is damn near impossible to spin off. The only one I ever loosened
    while riding was a very low gear (probably a 48/20), and one that I had
    just put on. I have tried, with cogs that have been on there a while, to
    loosen them by back-pedalling, skid-stopping, and all sorts of silly
    things, with no effect.

    It is also not likely to be the end of the world if it happens. Unless
    you sit there with your legs still for some distance, you won't completely
    unscrew the cog, and only then could things get messy.

    I use lockrings, and I recommend them, but doing without is not likely to
    get you killed.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | And what if you track down these men and kill them, what if you
    _`\(,_ | killed all of us? From every corner of Europe, hundreds,
    (_)/ (_) | thousands would rise up to take our places. Even Nazis can't
    kill that fast. -- Paul Henreid (Casablanca).
     
  11. dvt

    dvt Guest

    David L. Johnson wrote:
    > In a crit,
    > anyone who flats is out of the race, anyway, so the need for a
    > fast tire change is questionable.


    Most crits I've raced in allow a free lap for just such occasions. If
    you flat, you go to the pit, pick up your spare wheel, and get inserted
    back into the race on the next lap.

    Anecdote... I was racing a rainy crit a few years back, and a rider just
    ahead of me slipped and crashed. He and one other rider went down,
    causing a decent split in the field. I was caught behind the split, and
    my group never caught the front of the field again. The riders that
    crashed took a free lap, rejoined the front of the field, and went on to
    place high enough to take home some winnings.

    As they say, that's racing.

    --
    Dave
    dvt at psu dot edu
     
  12. Paul Hobson

    Paul Hobson Guest

    David L. Johnson wrote:
    > On Sun, 19 Mar 2006 08:08:23 -0800, 24inchdubs wrote:
    >>Hi, I got the wheels set for my track bike figured out. I got a nice
    >>27" front and either a quick release or solid axle rear wheel. The
    >>problem is now in the cog. I found this cog on Ebay and was wondering
    >>if it could work with my rear hub.


    >
    > The wheel is no great shakes, either. It is not really meant for fixed
    > gear riding. For $20 or so you can get a new hub that is meant for fixed
    > gear, with a lockring. Better idea. Check Harris Cyclery for details.


    ehh...try $45, going with a Formula flip-flop hub. Which are great hubs
    btw. I highly recommend them.
    \\paul
     
  13. David L. Johnson wrote:
    > On Sun, 19 Mar 2006 12:10:23 -0600, Earl Bollinger wrote:
    >
    > > Although it may work on your hub, you do not have a hub that is threaded so
    > > that you can use it with the lockring on it.
    > > With a fixed cog and no freewheel, you run a considerable risk of the cog
    > > unscrewing on you if you reverse pedal or use the pedals to brake or slow
    > > down.
    > > It is very dangerous when this happens.

    >
    > Come on. Don't overstate this. A cog that has been on and used for a
    > while is damn near impossible to spin off. The only one I ever loosened
    > while riding was a very low gear (probably a 48/20), and one that I had
    > just put on. I have tried, with cogs that have been on there a while, to
    > loosen them by back-pedalling, skid-stopping, and all sorts of silly
    > things, with no effect.
    >
    > It is also not likely to be the end of the world if it happens. Unless
    > you sit there with your legs still for some distance, you won't completely
    > unscrew the cog, and only then could things get messy.
    >
    > I use lockrings, and I recommend them, but doing without is not likely to
    > get you killed.


    Since people don't google the group, much...

    A few years ago, I put a well-greased cog onto a Campy road hub, nice
    and tight, with a regular (cheap) chain tool. Padded the handle with a
    shop rag, no extension for added leverage, tightened it once and then
    again after a short interval. I could have pushed harder... Then,
    backed the bike up against a wall, so the wheel couldn't move, and
    tried to spin the cog back off using the crank (backpedaling). It took
    several, going-for-glory,
    full WWF body slams to back the cog off. Rider weight, over 200lbs,
    plus taking full advantage of gravity, muscles, and a captive
    wheel/bike.

    How do you spin a cog off in the "real world", where the tire would
    slip long before such pressure could be applied?

    Having operated with strict budget constraints myself, I offer this as
    only a precaution: the rear wheel the OP pictured looks pretty dodgy to
    me. Rusty/frosty spokes, and that rim might be old enough that it
    doesn't have a hooked bead on it, either. Well, if it survives the
    redish and tensioning... --D-y
     
  14. Vee

    Vee Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > David L. Johnson wrote:
    > > On Sun, 19 Mar 2006 12:10:23 -0600, Earl Bollinger wrote:
    > >
    > > > Although it may work on your hub, you do not have a hub that is threaded so
    > > > that you can use it with the lockring on it.
    > > > With a fixed cog and no freewheel, you run a considerable risk of the cog
    > > > unscrewing on you if you reverse pedal or use the pedals to brake or slow
    > > > down.
    > > > It is very dangerous when this happens.

    > >
    > > Come on. Don't overstate this. A cog that has been on and used for a
    > > while is damn near impossible to spin off. The only one I ever loosened
    > > while riding was a very low gear (probably a 48/20), and one that I had
    > > just put on. I have tried, with cogs that have been on there a while, to
    > > loosen them by back-pedalling, skid-stopping, and all sorts of silly
    > > things, with no effect.
    > >
    > > It is also not likely to be the end of the world if it happens. Unless
    > > you sit there with your legs still for some distance, you won't completely
    > > unscrew the cog, and only then could things get messy.
    > >
    > > I use lockrings, and I recommend them, but doing without is not likely to
    > > get you killed.

    >
    > Since people don't google the group, much...
    >
    > A few years ago, I put a well-greased cog onto a Campy road hub, nice
    > and tight, with a regular (cheap) chain tool. Padded the handle with a
    > shop rag, no extension for added leverage, tightened it once and then
    > again after a short interval. I could have pushed harder... Then,
    > backed the bike up against a wall, so the wheel couldn't move, and
    > tried to spin the cog back off using the crank (backpedaling). It took
    > several, going-for-glory,
    > full WWF body slams to back the cog off. Rider weight, over 200lbs,
    > plus taking full advantage of gravity, muscles, and a captive
    > wheel/bike.


    Did you ride this setup? With or without brakes? I bet you would have
    applied more force through the pedals in a panic-stop situation than
    you did with the wheel against a wall. I agree that it's tough to spin
    a cog off by jumping on the crank while the wheel is pressed against
    your door, but that's irrelevant. I've gotten cogs tighter than I
    suspect you did with your chain whip (if that's what you meant by
    "chain tool"), and easily spun them loose in panic situations (my
    setup: approx 75 gear inches, clipless pedals, new DA cog on new Surly
    hub, tightened with a long track cog wrench). Fortunately, I had a
    front brake as well.

    > How do you spin a cog off in the "real world", where the tire would
    > slip long before such pressure could be applied?


    You tell us. Take the brakes off the bike you describe above and ride
    in nasty traffic. Good luck.

    -Vee
     
  15. On Mon, 20 Mar 2006 10:23:21 -0800, Vee wrote:

    > Did you ride this setup? With or without brakes? I bet you would have
    > applied more force through the pedals in a panic-stop situation than
    > you did with the wheel against a wall.


    You'd lose that bet.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | A mathematician is a machine for turning coffee into theorems.
    _`\(,_ | -- Paul Erdos
    (_)/ (_) |
     
  16. Vee wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:
    > > Since people don't google the group, much...
    > >
    > > A few years ago, I put a well-greased cog onto a Campy road hub, nice
    > > and tight, with a regular (cheap) chain tool. Padded the handle with a
    > > shop rag, no extension for added leverage, tightened it once and then
    > > again after a short interval. I could have pushed harder... Then,
    > > backed the bike up against a wall, so the wheel couldn't move, and
    > > tried to spin the cog back off using the crank (backpedaling). It took
    > > several, going-for-glory,
    > > full WWF body slams to back the cog off. Rider weight, over 200lbs,
    > > plus taking full advantage of gravity, muscles, and a captive
    > > wheel/bike.


    (Vee):

    > Did you ride this setup?


    This iteration? I don't believe so. Same parts, different time, yes.
    Several other combinations of same/similar parts: Campy NR or Tipo road
    hub, TDK (?) Suntour, Dura Ace cogs. Very non-continuous, but my first
    road conversion fixer was 1981. Or maybe 82; but I think 81.

    > With or without brakes?


    Always with brakes, until the last year or so. Now I have a bike with
    front only. Don't like it much.

    > I bet you would have
    > applied more force through the pedals in a panic-stop situation than
    > you did with the wheel against a wall. I agree that it's tough to spin
    > a cog off by jumping on the crank while the wheel is pressed against
    > your door, but that's irrelevant.


    How so? The bike is braced, the tire can't skid, there are no
    distractions. Like I said, I went for the gusto.

    > I've gotten cogs tighter than I
    > suspect you did with your chain whip (if that's what you meant by
    > "chain tool"),


    Yeah that's what I meant. Maybe you did get a cog on tighter than me.

    > and easily spun them loose in panic situations (my
    > setup: approx 75 gear inches, clipless pedals, new DA cog on new Surly
    > hub, tightened with a long track cog wrench). Fortunately, I had a
    > front brake as well.


    Well, you'll have to explain how you could push down harder than I did
    while you were moving without the tire skidding.

    (I asked):
    > > How do you spin a cog off in the "real world", where the tire would
    > > slip long before such pressure could be applied?


    (Vee replied):
    > You tell us.


    No, you tell me. I asked first. Let's hear the technique used.

    (Vee):

    > Take the brakes off the bike you describe above and ride
    > in nasty traffic. Good luck.


    Go jump in the lake, and the same good fortune to you.

    I am so open to someone showing me the fault(s) in my little
    experiment. Really, and "TIA". --D-y
     
  17. Paul Hobson

    Paul Hobson Guest

    > Vee wrote:
    >> Take the brakes off the bike you describe above and ride
    >>in nasty traffic. Good luck.


    [email protected] wrote:
    > Go jump in the lake, and the same good fortune to you.
    >
    > I am so open to someone showing me the fault(s) in my little
    > experiment. Really, and "TIA". --D-y


    Well, I really can't take sides here since I'm not exactly sure what I
    think. But I'll try to offer the following...

    1) There was a thread a while ago about setting up fixies. On poster
    chimed in that had a buddy who rode sans lockring and could lock up the
    pedals but keep the weight on the rear wheel such that the lockring
    would on thread. According to the poster, his buddy would then have to
    spin really fast to thread the cog back on. Here's that thread (post 14
    by Tom Nakashima) <http://tinyurl.com/grreg>

    Secondly: Also, I think you're experiment is a little flawed in that you
    putting dramatic, but short forces on one pedal at a time (right?).
    Truth be told, I get most of my stopping power by pulling up as my front
    foot travels downward. And obviously, when I slow down sans brakes, I'm
    applying that pressure over a range of motion (time) that is much long
    than your body slams.

    c) Whenever I've set up the few fixie wheels that I own, I thread on the
    cog as tight as I can, get the lockring on as tight as a I can, then
    ride up the steep high just outside my house to get it tighter. Then I
    have to walk down or else I'll unthread the cog back to where it was
    before I've a chance to tighten the lockring further. I've never had to
    do this more than once and I've haven't felt my cogs slip back even the
    slightest bit.

    but that's just my personal experience.

    --
    Paul M. Hobson
    Georgia Institute of Technology
    ..:change the f to ph to reply:.
     
  18. Well I am definitely gonna run full brakes. Also, Im gonna re do that
    wheel. New spokes, service the bearings and stuff. My mechanic buddy is
    gonna help out. thanks for all the input.
     
  19. On Tue, 21 Mar 2006 13:21:01 -0500, Paul Hobson wrote:

    > 1) There was a thread a while ago about setting up fixies. On poster
    > chimed in that had a buddy who rode sans lockring and could lock up the
    > pedals but keep the weight on the rear wheel such that the lockring
    > would on thread. According to the poster, his buddy would then have to
    > spin really fast to thread the cog back on. Here's that thread (post 14
    > by Tom Nakashima) <http://tinyurl.com/grreg>


    Bunk. Unless he does that all the time, so that the cog won't get
    properly seated. I have personal experience that it is extremely hard to
    unscrew a cog that has been ridden (like for 1000 miles or so).

    > Secondly: Also, I think you're experiment is a little flawed in that you
    > putting dramatic, but short forces on one pedal at a time (right?).
    > Truth be told, I get most of my stopping power by pulling up as my front
    > foot travels downward. And obviously, when I slow down sans brakes, I'm
    > applying that pressure over a range of motion (time) that is much long
    > than your body slams.


    This would be less likely, rather than more likely, to cause the cog to
    loosen.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Deserves death! I daresay he does. Many that live deserve
    _`\(,_ | death. And some that die deserve life. Can you give it to
    (_)/ (_) | them? Then do not be too eager to deal out death in judgement.
    -- J. R. R. Tolkein
     
  20. Paul Hobson wrote:

    > 1) There was a thread a while ago about setting up fixies. On poster
    > chimed in that had a buddy who rode sans lockring and could lock up the
    > pedals but keep the weight on the rear wheel such that the lockring
    > would on thread. According to the poster, his buddy would then have to
    > spin really fast to thread the cog back on. Here's that thread (post 14
    > by Tom Nakashima) <http://tinyurl.com/grreg>
    >
    > Secondly: Also, I think you're experiment is a little flawed in that you
    > putting dramatic, but short forces on one pedal at a time (right?).
    > Truth be told, I get most of my stopping power by pulling up as my front
    > foot travels downward. And obviously, when I slow down sans brakes, I'm
    > applying that pressure over a range of motion (time) that is much long
    > than your body slams.
    >
    > c) Whenever I've set up the few fixie wheels that I own, I thread on the
    > cog as tight as I can, get the lockring on as tight as a I can, then
    > ride up the steep high just outside my house to get it tighter. Then I
    > have to walk down or else I'll unthread the cog back to where it was
    > before I've a chance to tighten the lockring further. I've never had to
    > do this more than once and I've haven't felt my cogs slip back even the
    > slightest bit.
    >
    > but that's just my personal experience.


    Thank you for posting that.

    Begs a couple of questions:
    How much you can tighten the LR after your trip up the hill?
    Have you ever loosened a cog, LR or no, on a fixer, in "normal road
    use"?
    IOW, have you found this extra tightening to be needed to prevent
    loosenings experienced without the trip up the hill? What size gear are
    you using, in inches?

    Paul, you could save yourself a walk down the hill if you carried your
    LR wrench with you on the
    ride up <g>.

    I'm a retired repair/remodel plumber, and "gave it my best shot" to get
    that cog off with the pedal (the right one), in light of that
    experience. A carefully applied blast of torque, IMS, is what pops
    parts loose. Your muscles get tired pretty fast, so your first effort
    needs to be a good one. I do think my technique improved on the third
    or fourth (fifth, sixth, whatever it was) slam and I finally nailed it
    hard enough to spin the cog backwards. I blocked the wheel because
    (Sheldon Brown writes about this) traction is so limited on the rear
    wheel when in motion, riding, that it is very easy to lock it up with a
    caliper brake (weak stopping power), at which point your feet can
    (will) stop pedaling as you slide the rear tire. IOW, I didn't want to
    leave an easy way for my cog- unscrewing efforts' energy to be lost in
    slippage. I think it was a pretty good setup; the bike couldn't move
    much at all, and I had balance and control much better than I think
    could be done while rolling, testimony of those who say they can
    unscrew tight cogs notwithstanding. "I'd like to see them do it", as
    the saying goes. Still open. --D-y
     
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