track racing gloves

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Bleve, Mar 14, 2007.

  1. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    I've been looking for a good pair of track racing gloves for some
    time, ones with decent knuckle armour (one must, after all, win the
    punchup after the hook, and knuckles are fragile). I haven't seen
    them anywhere though, motorcycle road gloves are too heavy and clumsy,
    dirtbike gloves look like they'd disintegrate at the first touch of
    concrete or bitumen (most velodrones I've been on ....) and I know a
    lot of trackies that use golf gloves, but I wonder how resilient they
    are and they offer no knuckle protection. Googling around for track
    gloves shows a few hits for keirin gloves, but they're expensive
    (around $130USD) and I wasn't able to find an Oz distributor. But, it
    turns out that Tuff make a keirin glove. And, the shop I work at
    carries Tuff gloves sometimes. My review of these gloves is yet to
    come, but anyone racing track who's after an affordable track
    sprinters glove may be interested, their RRP is about $50 and I'll
    hopefully be testing them this w'end at Blackburn. Not *really*
    testing them though!

    Rumour has it that Japanese Keirin riders are trained to not let go of
    the bars when they crash, which is interesting. Something about
    reduced risk of collarbone breaks? Anyone know the full story? I can
    think of a few reasons for why it might be good, but don't really
    know....

    I'll have my new bling Easton carbon track bars too ... stiffer,
    lighter, stronger ... w00t!
     
    Tags:


  2. PiledHigher

    PiledHigher Guest

    On Mar 15, 4:11 pm, "Bleve" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I've been looking for a good pair of track racing gloves for some
    > time, ones with decent knuckle armour (one must, after all, win the
    > punchup after the hook, and knuckles are fragile). I haven't seen
    > them anywhere though, motorcycle road gloves are too heavy and clumsy,
    > dirtbike gloves look like they'd disintegrate at the first touch of
    > concrete or bitumen (most velodrones I've been on ....) and I know a
    > lot of trackies that use golf gloves, but I wonder how resilient they
    > are and they offer no knuckle protection. Googling around for track
    > gloves shows a few hits for keirin gloves, but they're expensive
    > (around $130USD) and I wasn't able to find an Oz distributor. But, it
    > turns out that Tuff make a keirin glove. And, the shop I work at
    > carries Tuff gloves sometimes. My review of these gloves is yet to
    > come, but anyone racing track who's after an affordable track
    > sprinters glove may be interested, their RRP is about $50 and I'll
    > hopefully be testing them this w'end at Blackburn. Not *really*
    > testing them though!
    >
    > Rumour has it that Japanese Keirin riders are trained to not let go of
    > the bars when they crash, which is interesting. Something about
    > reduced risk of collarbone breaks? Anyone know the full story? I can
    > think of a few reasons for why it might be good, but don't really
    > know....
    >
    > I'll have my new bling Easton carbon track bars too ... stiffer,
    > lighter, stronger ... w00t!


    I thought golf gloves were the thing, no knuckle protection though.

    Holding on won't help you when you break your collarbone by landing on
    your shoulder...
     
  3. PiledHigher

    PiledHigher Guest

    On Mar 15, 4:11 pm, "Bleve" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I'll have my new bling Easton carbon track bars too ... stiffer,
    > lighter, stronger ... w00t!


    Carbon for track, I thought that the sprinters were resolutely staying
    with steel bars.
     
  4. Donga

    Donga Guest

    On Mar 15, 3:49 pm, "PiledHigher" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Mar 15, 4:11 pm, "Bleve" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > I've been looking for a good pair of track racing gloves for some
    > > time, ones with decent knuckle armour (one must, after all, win the
    > > punchup after the hook, and knuckles are fragile). I haven't seen
    > > them anywhere though, motorcycle road gloves are too heavy and clumsy,
    > > dirtbike gloves look like they'd disintegrate at the first touch of
    > > concrete or bitumen (most velodrones I've been on ....) and I know a
    > > lot of trackies that use golf gloves, but I wonder how resilient they
    > > are and they offer no knuckle protection. Googling around for track
    > > gloves shows a few hits for keirin gloves, but they're expensive
    > > (around $130USD) and I wasn't able to find an Oz distributor. But, it
    > > turns out that Tuff make a keirin glove. And, the shop I work at
    > > carries Tuff gloves sometimes. My review of these gloves is yet to
    > > come, but anyone racing track who's after an affordable track
    > > sprinters glove may be interested, their RRP is about $50 and I'll
    > > hopefully be testing them this w'end at Blackburn. Not *really*
    > > testing them though!

    >
    > > Rumour has it that Japanese Keirin riders are trained to not let go of
    > > the bars when they crash, which is interesting. Something about
    > > reduced risk of collarbone breaks? Anyone know the full story? I can
    > > think of a few reasons for why it might be good, but don't really
    > > know....

    >
    > > I'll have my new bling Easton carbon track bars too ... stiffer,
    > > lighter, stronger ... w00t!

    >
    > I thought golf gloves were the thing, no knuckle protection though.
    >
    > Holding on won't help you when you break your collarbone by landing on
    > your shoulder...- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    No, the best way to avoid breaking your collarbone in a crash is to be
    drunk. You are much more relaxed and tend to roll about. It works!

    Donga
     
  5. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    On Mar 15, 4:51 pm, "PiledHigher" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Mar 15, 4:11 pm, "Bleve" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I'll have my new bling Easton carbon track bars too ... stiffer,
    > > lighter, stronger ... w00t!

    >
    > Carbon for track, I thought that the sprinters were resolutely staying
    > with steel bars.


    Nope. Both Shane Kelly & Jobie Dajka were using Easton EC90's at
    Leongatha and Bendigo.
     
  6. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    On Mar 15, 4:49 pm, "PiledHigher" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Mar 15, 4:11 pm, "Bleve" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > I've been looking for a good pair of track racing gloves for some
    > > time, ones with decent knuckle armour (one must, after all, win the
    > > punchup after the hook, and knuckles are fragile). I haven't seen
    > > them anywhere though, motorcycle road gloves are too heavy and clumsy,
    > > dirtbike gloves look like they'd disintegrate at the first touch of
    > > concrete or bitumen (most velodrones I've been on ....) and I know a
    > > lot of trackies that use golf gloves, but I wonder how resilient they
    > > are and they offer no knuckle protection. Googling around for track
    > > gloves shows a few hits for keirin gloves, but they're expensive
    > > (around $130USD) and I wasn't able to find an Oz distributor. But, it
    > > turns out that Tuff make a keirin glove. And, the shop I work at
    > > carries Tuff gloves sometimes. My review of these gloves is yet to
    > > come, but anyone racing track who's after an affordable track
    > > sprinters glove may be interested, their RRP is about $50 and I'll
    > > hopefully be testing them this w'end at Blackburn. Not *really*
    > > testing them though!

    >
    > > Rumour has it that Japanese Keirin riders are trained to not let go of
    > > the bars when they crash, which is interesting. Something about
    > > reduced risk of collarbone breaks? Anyone know the full story? I can
    > > think of a few reasons for why it might be good, but don't really
    > > know....

    >
    > > I'll have my new bling Easton carbon track bars too ... stiffer,
    > > lighter, stronger ... w00t!

    >
    > I thought golf gloves were the thing, no knuckle protection though.
    >
    > Holding on won't help you when you break your collarbone by landing on
    > your shoulder...


    It didn't make much sense to me either, but maybe holding on reduces
    the risk of an arm getting caught in someone's chain or similar? As
    above, it was only a rumour, I don't know if it's true or not.
     
  7. Snuffy

    Snuffy New Member

    Joined:
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    Howsabout this?

    http://www.kookiebikes.com/components/misc/misc.htm
     
  8. In aus.bicycle on 14 Mar 2007 22:11:16 -0700
    Bleve <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I've been looking for a good pair of track racing gloves for some
    > time, ones with decent knuckle armour (one must, after all, win the
    > punchup after the hook, and knuckles are fragile). I haven't seen
    > them anywhere though, motorcycle road gloves are too heavy and clumsy,
    > dirtbike gloves look like they'd disintegrate at the first touch of
    > concrete or bitumen (most velodrones I've been on ....) and I know a


    Dirtbike gloves seem to hold together that I've seen.

    Find some motorcycle gloves that have been crashed in and get them
    for free. Cut the knuckle protection off and sew to the golf gloves.

    Ask a motorcycle shop that sponsors racers for any crashed gloves, or
    put a sign up in a wreckers.

    Most knackered gloves have the palms ripped out and the back of the
    hand is fine.

    Zebee
     
  9. parawolf

    parawolf New Member

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  10. parawolf

    parawolf New Member

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  11. JayWoo

    JayWoo New Member

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    The theory I've heard behind this is if you hold on, and tight mind you, you are creating a box type effect with the bars, yours arms & your shoulders. This is supposed to be better\stronger\more protective than having your arms flap about… I’m yet to test the theory. Watching some of the Jap K racing, it looks to me like they are wearing shoulder padding. This is gota help with the 'arms on the bars'.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFRahWnA4YM&mode=related&search=


    P0rn!
     
  12. rooman

    rooman New Member

    Joined:
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    leather golf gloves do the trick, Zeebee is right, the back of the fingers and hands come off fine.......mine are white fabric with leather palm pads (from leKnicks for $30 a few seasons back and going strong even aftrer biting the DISC banking and duck boards a few more times than I care to remember)

    any colour of glove as long as it's white

    any shoe as long as its Duegi ( white first, then black if you can't get white, 'cos they dont make them anymore...sniff!)

    and any Track bar as long as its NKS stamped and Steel (ultra light weight isnt important on the track, rigid strength and minimal flex is the aim generally, but more important, the ability to see the crack is uber important...critical failure at speed is not a pretty thing to think about)

    but heck...use what you want...there is no bling at the track for riders, just the onlookers, (for riders there's just class and arse...)

    my theory on carbon accessories ( at least up till recent times) if some one other than you has to pay for it, by all means go ahead and get it...try it out, if it breaks you arnt going to fuss too much about the broken component, ( just the body )...pain goes away, it is memory and loss that lingers...and its often hard to get the money back....overall I'm not a fan of carbon, if I know something is virtually impossible to test in situ for cracks, and is likely if it fails to do so on the limit, ummm that's not a great feature...

    but each to his own... at least being there is the buzz, all the rest can only make it better...
     
  13. Resound

    Resound Guest

    "Bleve" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I've been looking for a good pair of track racing gloves for some
    > time, ones with decent knuckle armour (one must, after all, win the
    > punchup after the hook, and knuckles are fragile). I haven't seen
    > them anywhere though, motorcycle road gloves are too heavy and clumsy,
    > dirtbike gloves look like they'd disintegrate at the first touch of
    > concrete or bitumen (most velodrones I've been on ....) and I know a
    > lot of trackies that use golf gloves, but I wonder how resilient they
    > are and they offer no knuckle protection. Googling around for track
    > gloves shows a few hits for keirin gloves, but they're expensive
    > (around $130USD) and I wasn't able to find an Oz distributor. But, it
    > turns out that Tuff make a keirin glove. And, the shop I work at
    > carries Tuff gloves sometimes. My review of these gloves is yet to
    > come, but anyone racing track who's after an affordable track
    > sprinters glove may be interested, their RRP is about $50 and I'll
    > hopefully be testing them this w'end at Blackburn. Not *really*
    > testing them though!
    >
    > Rumour has it that Japanese Keirin riders are trained to not let go of
    > the bars when they crash, which is interesting. Something about
    > reduced risk of collarbone breaks? Anyone know the full story? I can
    > think of a few reasons for why it might be good, but don't really
    > know....
    >
    > I'll have my new bling Easton carbon track bars too ... stiffer,
    > lighter, stronger ... w00t!
    >


    Sadly no longer available, but for knuckle protection:
    http://www.revival.us/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=264
     
  14. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

  15. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    On Mar 15, 11:03 pm, rooman <[email protected]
    mx.forums.cyclingforums.com> wrote:
    > Bleve Wrote:
    >
    > > I've been looking for a good pair of track racing gloves for some
    > > time, ones with decent knuckle armour (one must, after all, win the
    > > punchup after the hook, and knuckles are fragile). I haven't seen
    > > them anywhere though, motorcycle road gloves are too heavy and clumsy,
    > > dirtbike gloves look like they'd disintegrate at the first touch of
    > > concrete or bitumen (most velodrones I've been on ....) and I know a
    > > lot of trackies that use golf gloves, but I wonder how resilient they
    > > are and they offer no knuckle protection. Googling around for track
    > > gloves shows a few hits for keirin gloves, but they're expensive
    > > (around $130USD) and I wasn't able to find an Oz distributor. But, it
    > > turns out that Tuff make a keirin glove. And, the shop I work at
    > > carries Tuff gloves sometimes. My review of these gloves is yet to
    > > come, but anyone racing track who's after an affordable track
    > > sprinters glove may be interested, their RRP is about $50 and I'll
    > > hopefully be testing them this w'end at Blackburn. Not *really*
    > > testing them though!

    >
    > > Rumour has it that Japanese Keirin riders are trained to not let go of
    > > the bars when they crash, which is interesting. Something about
    > > reduced risk of collarbone breaks? Anyone know the full story? I can
    > > think of a few reasons for why it might be good, but don't really
    > > know....

    >
    > > I'll have my new bling Easton carbon track bars too ... stiffer,
    > > lighter, stronger ... w00t!

    >
    > leather golf gloves do the trick, Zeebee is right, the back of the
    > fingers and hands come off fine.......mine are white fabric with
    > leather palm pads (from leKnicks for $30 a few seasons back and going
    > strong even aftrer biting the DISC banking and duck boards a few more
    > times than I care to remember)


    With all due respect, if Shane Kelly & Jobie Dajka are using armoured
    gloves and carbon bars, then I suspect, they're the go. These people
    ride for a living and have, I expect, a fair clue about what works and
    what doesn't. Given that I can get them both quite cheaply (even RRP
    on the Tuff armoured gloves is less than $50), why not?

    And, FWIW, it is quite easy to do a non-destructive test for carbon
    failure - the 'coin test' works as well as anything else (95%, I was
    quoted). I trust carbon, my forks are made of it on all my roadies
    and my track bike. Nothing's more critical than forks ....
     
  16. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    On Mar 15, 6:24 pm, Zebee Johnstone <[email protected]> wrote:
    > In aus.bicycle on 14 Mar 2007 22:11:16 -0700
    >
    > Bleve <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > I've been looking for a good pair of track racing gloves for some
    > > time, ones with decent knuckle armour (one must, after all, win the
    > > punchup after the hook, and knuckles are fragile). I haven't seen
    > > them anywhere though, motorcycle road gloves are too heavy and clumsy,
    > > dirtbike gloves look like they'd disintegrate at the first touch of
    > > concrete or bitumen (most velodrones I've been on ....) and I know a

    >
    > Dirtbike gloves seem to hold together that I've seen.
    >
    > Find some motorcycle gloves that have been crashed in and get them
    > for free. Cut the knuckle protection off and sew to the golf gloves.


    Why would I waste my time? I can get properly made ones for less than
    $50 rrp, designed for the job.
     
  17. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    On Mar 15, 9:59 pm, parawolf <[email protected]
    mx.forums.cyclingforums.com> wrote:
    > Or these...
    >
    > http://www.rocketparts.com/gloves.html


    Neither of those options have worthwhile armour, and they're all
    expensive. The Tuff gloves didn't arrive today (but the bars did, and
    they're gorgeous!), but I expect them tomorrow. I'll take photos and
    post a link ...
     
  18. In aus.bicycle on 15 Mar 2007 05:46:09 -0700
    Bleve <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > With all due respect, if Shane Kelly & Jobie Dajka are using armoured
    > gloves and carbon bars, then I suspect, they're the go. These people
    > ride for a living and have, I expect, a fair clue about what works and
    > what doesn't. Given that I can get them both quite cheaply (even RRP
    > on the Tuff armoured gloves is less than $50), why not?


    I dunno. Are they sponsored? Do they fall off a lot?

    If they are sponsored, they use what the sponsor gives them, at least
    that's how it works in motorcycle racing. And if they aren't falling
    off a lot, then they don't really have much knowledge of what's needed
    because they don't have the experience.

    They may have armoured gloves because they *think* it makes them
    safer, not because it does.

    (Which seems to be the idea behind the knuckle protectors on
    motorcycle gloves. Racer injuries seem to be palm and little finger,
    the latter being a crush injury that gloves won't protect from.)

    They may also be very well informed, it just isn't automatically true
    that what they wear is a) needed and b) their choice.

    Zebee
     
  19. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    On Mar 16, 6:02 am, Zebee Johnstone <[email protected]> wrote:
    > In aus.bicycle on 15 Mar 2007 05:46:09 -0700
    >
    > Bleve <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > With all due respect, if Shane Kelly & Jobie Dajka are using armoured
    > > gloves and carbon bars, then I suspect, they're the go. These people
    > > ride for a living and have, I expect, a fair clue about what works and
    > > what doesn't. Given that I can get them both quite cheaply (even RRP
    > > on the Tuff armoured gloves is less than $50), why not?

    >
    > I dunno. Are they sponsored?


    yes


    > Do they fall off a lot?


    Not a lot, but sometimes.

    > If they are sponsored, they use what the sponsor gives them, at least
    > that's how it works in motorcycle racing.


    That depends on what the sponsor gives them. There's a lot of pro
    cyclists using rebadged things to keep sponsors happy.

    > And if they aren't falling
    > off a lot, then they don't really have much knowledge of what's needed
    > because they don't have the experience.
    >
    > They may have armoured gloves because they *think* it makes them
    > safer, not because it does.


    That's quite possibly true.

    > (Which seems to be the idea behind the knuckle protectors on
    > motorcycle gloves. Racer injuries seem to be palm and little finger,
    > the latter being a crush injury that gloves won't protect from.)


    I don't have any hard data, but, as above, if I can get a pair of
    comfortable, armoured gloves at a good price, why not?
     
  20. Plodder

    Plodder Guest

    "Bleve" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I've been looking for a good pair of track racing gloves for some
    > time, ones with decent knuckle armour (one must, after all, win the
    > punchup after the hook, and knuckles are fragile). I haven't seen
    > them anywhere though, motorcycle road gloves are too heavy and clumsy,
    > dirtbike gloves look like they'd disintegrate at the first touch of
    > concrete or bitumen (most velodrones I've been on ....) and I know a
    > lot of trackies that use golf gloves, but I wonder how resilient they
    > are and they offer no knuckle protection. Googling around for track
    > gloves shows a few hits for keirin gloves, but they're expensive
    > (around $130USD) and I wasn't able to find an Oz distributor. But, it
    > turns out that Tuff make a keirin glove. And, the shop I work at
    > carries Tuff gloves sometimes. My review of these gloves is yet to
    > come, but anyone racing track who's after an affordable track
    > sprinters glove may be interested, their RRP is about $50 and I'll
    > hopefully be testing them this w'end at Blackburn. Not *really*
    > testing them though!
    >
    > Rumour has it that Japanese Keirin riders are trained to not let go of
    > the bars when they crash, which is interesting. Something about
    > reduced risk of collarbone breaks? Anyone know the full story? I can
    > think of a few reasons for why it might be good, but don't really
    > know....
    >
    > I'll have my new bling Easton carbon track bars too ... stiffer,
    > lighter, stronger ... w00t!


    Holding on to the bars is an old MTB thing too. It's a way of preventing the
    natural reaction of sticking out an arm to arrest your fall, landing
    straight-armed and breaking collarbone/wrist. As a talentless MTBer who
    falls regularly it's worked for me so far...

    Cheers,

    Frank
     
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