Trail etiquette???

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Tcmedara, Nov 30, 2003.

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  1. Tcmedara

    Tcmedara Guest

    The local city park has about 7 miles of dedicated mountain bike trail. Nothing spectacular, but fun
    to ride and only ten minutes from my house. The trails consists of three loops of singletrack linked
    by a fire road. All three loops are marked with entrances from the fire road, and the exits back
    onto the road are posted with good-sized "Do Not Enter" signs. The intent is obviously to have one
    way traffic on the singletrack portions of the trail.

    Over the past few weeks, I've passed over a dozen riders coming at me from the wrong direction. The
    first few surprised the hell out of me, then I started commenting on the way by, something like,
    "Hey, this is a one-way loop," or "wrong direction," or "travel goes this way." Usually I just got a
    blank stare in return. On today's ride, I just rode by without commenting as it seems I'm fighting a
    losing battle.

    I must say that most have has politely pulled off to the side to let me pass, a sort of tacit
    acknowledgement that I had the right of way. None the less, it still irks me a bit. My biggest beef
    is that I'm not expecting someone to be coming at me with a closure rate of 20+mph on a skinny
    forest track. My assumption on a one way trail is that there wont't be any riders coming at me.
    Everytime it happens it gives me a bit of a start, and several times I've been forced to brake to
    make sure there would be clearance to pass. Not that big a deal, its just that I'm not expecting
    other riders when coming around corners or pointing downhill.

    Personally I could care less if the trails are uni- or bidirectional, I'm sure any safety benefits
    are marginal as long as everyone knows what to expect. That said, as long as they are marked one way
    I assume people should adhere to them or else constitue a hazard for those who expect the trail to
    be clear of oncoming riders. Is riding backwards on a one way trail an etiquitte breach, a safety
    issue, an annoynace, or all three? Or am I just too uptight? Intersted to hear other's opinions and
    related experiences.

    Tom
     
    Tags:


  2. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "tcmedara" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]... <snip>
    >
    > Personally I could care less if the trails are uni- or bidirectional, I'm sure any safety benefits
    > are marginal as long as everyone knows what to expect. That said, as long as they are marked one
    > way I assume people should adhere to them or else constitue a hazard for those who expect the
    > trail to be clear of oncoming riders. Is riding backwards on a one way trail an etiquitte breach,
    > a safety issue, an annoynace, or all three? Or am I just too uptight? Intersted to hear other's
    > opinions and related experiences.

    We have a one way system here. Occasionally I'll ride it backwards but usually during the week when
    I believe no one else it out there. I may encounter a rider and like the others you mention I yield
    to the 'right' way rider. Perhaps it may be time for the management of the park to reverse the usual
    riding direction. You could talk to the managers about it. It would seem the riders are bored with
    riding it one way or find it 'easier' to ride it in that direction.

    Mike
     
  3. Tcmedara

    Tcmedara Guest

    "Michael Dart" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    Perhaps it may be time for the management of the park to reverse the
    > usual riding direction. You could talk to the managers about it. It
    would
    > seem the riders are bored with riding it one way or find it 'easier' to
    ride
    > it in that direction.
    >
    > Mike
    >
    >
    A damn fine suggestion. Easier - no. Bored - probably (Like the Inuit people who have dozens of
    words to describe white, we who live in the coastal plane can give you quite a few to decribe
    flat!). I know just who to talk to. Thanks

    Tom
     
  4. Mtb Lover

    Mtb Lover Guest

    tcmedara wrote:
    > The local city park has about 7 miles of dedicated mountain bike trail. Nothing spectacular, but
    > fun to ride and only ten minutes from my house. The trails consists of three loops of singletrack
    > linked by a fire road. All three loops are marked with entrances from the fire road, and the exits
    > back onto the road are posted with good-sized "Do Not Enter" signs. The intent is obviously to
    > have one way traffic on the singletrack portions of the trail.
    >
    > Over the past few weeks, I've passed over a dozen riders coming at me from the wrong direction.
    > The first few surprised the hell out of me, then I started commenting on the way by, something
    > like, "Hey, this is a one-way loop," or "wrong direction," or "travel goes this way." Usually I
    > just got a blank stare in return. On today's ride, I just rode by without commenting as it seems
    > I'm fighting a losing battle.
    >
    > I must say that most have has politely pulled off to the side to let me pass, a sort of tacit
    > acknowledgement that I had the right of way. None the less, it still irks me a bit. My biggest
    > beef is that I'm not expecting someone to be coming at me with a closure rate of 20+mph on a
    > skinny forest track. My assumption on a one way trail is that there wont't be any riders coming at
    > me. Everytime it happens it gives me a bit of a start, and several times I've been forced to brake
    > to make sure there would be clearance to pass. Not that big a deal, its just that I'm not
    > expecting other riders when coming around corners or pointing downhill.
    >
    > Personally I could care less if the trails are uni- or bidirectional, I'm sure any safety benefits
    > are marginal as long as everyone knows what to expect. That said, as long as they are marked one
    > way I assume people should adhere to them or else constitue a hazard for those who expect the
    > trail to be clear of oncoming riders. Is riding backwards on a one way trail an etiquitte breach,
    > a safety issue, an annoynace, or all three? Or am I just too uptight? Intersted to hear other's
    > opinions and related experiences.
    >
    > Tom
    >
    >
    I am with you, I find it annoying. most of the trails where I live are bi-directional, So I try to
    follow the up-down rule (if you are going uphill you have the right of way, those going downhill
    should pull to the side, because they can start up easier.) Although I think I am the only person
    who knows that rule. On todays ride, I was irked to see horses on a tight twisty singletrack. I said
    something to my co-rider, and he shrugged it off saying it doesn't matter, I disagree, if 1500 pound
    horses continue to use the singletrack, it will get wider and wider until it isn't a singletrack but
    a horse trail! So the rules are there for a reason, and they should be followed. If riders continue
    to pass each other in opposite directions, the trail will certainly get wider and wider.

    --
    Jerry [email protected] remove the nospam and the period to email me.
     
  5. Hmm... Sounds like a trail I know in Philadelphia. Good luck teaching them.

    "tcmedara" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > The local city park has about 7 miles of dedicated mountain bike trail. Nothing spectacular, but
    > fun to ride and only ten minutes from my house. The trails consists of three loops of singletrack
    > linked by a fire road. All three loops are marked with entrances from the fire road, and the
    exits
    > back onto the road are posted with good-sized "Do Not Enter" signs. The intent is obviously to
    > have one way traffic on the singletrack portions of the trail.
    >
    > Over the past few weeks, I've passed over a dozen riders coming at me from the wrong
    > direction. The first few surprised the hell out of me, then I started commenting on the way
    > by, something like, "Hey, this is a one-way loop," or "wrong direction," or "travel goes this
    > way." Usually I just
    got
    > a blank stare in return. On today's ride, I just rode by without
    commenting
    > as it seems I'm fighting a losing battle.
    >
    > I must say that most have has politely pulled off to the side to let me pass, a sort of tacit
    > acknowledgement that I had the right of way. None
    the
    > less, it still irks me a bit. My biggest beef is that I'm not expecting someone to be coming at me
    > with a closure rate of 20+mph on a skinny
    forest
    > track. My assumption on a one way trail is that there wont't be any
    riders
    > coming at me. Everytime it happens it gives me a bit of a start, and several times I've been
    > forced to brake to make sure there would be clearance to pass. Not that big a deal, its just that
    > I'm not expecting other riders when coming around corners or pointing downhill.
    >
    > Personally I could care less if the trails are uni- or bidirectional, I'm sure any safety benefits
    > are marginal as long as everyone knows what to expect. That said, as long as they are marked one
    > way I assume people should adhere to them or else constitue a hazard for those who expect the
    > trail to be clear of oncoming riders. Is riding backwards on a one way trail an etiquitte breach,
    > a safety issue, an annoynace, or all three? Or am I just too uptight? Intersted to hear other's
    > opinions and related experiences.
    >
    > Tom
     
  6. In my area, one of the only ways to get permission to build a trail is allow equestrian use. It
    seems that the greenies will consider it "nature" use. It sucks, but we wanna ride.

    "MTB Lover" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > tcmedara wrote:
    > > The local city park has about 7 miles of dedicated mountain bike trail. Nothing spectacular, but
    > > fun to ride and only ten minutes from my house. The trails consists of three loops of
    > > singletrack linked by a fire road. All three loops are marked with entrances from the fire road,
    > > and the
    exits
    > > back onto the road are posted with good-sized "Do Not Enter" signs. The intent is obviously to
    > > have one way traffic on the singletrack portions
    of
    > > the trail.
    > >
    > > Over the past few weeks, I've passed over a dozen riders coming at me
    from
    > > the wrong direction. The first few surprised the hell out of me, then I started commenting on
    > > the way by, something like, "Hey, this is a
    one-way
    > > loop," or "wrong direction," or "travel goes this way." Usually I just
    got
    > > a blank stare in return. On today's ride, I just rode by without
    commenting
    > > as it seems I'm fighting a losing battle.
    > >
    > > I must say that most have has politely pulled off to the side to let me pass, a sort of tacit
    > > acknowledgement that I had the right of way. None
    the
    > > less, it still irks me a bit. My biggest beef is that I'm not expecting someone to be coming at
    > > me with a closure rate of 20+mph on a skinny
    forest
    > > track. My assumption on a one way trail is that there wont't be any
    riders
    > > coming at me. Everytime it happens it gives me a bit of a start, and several times I've been
    > > forced to brake to make sure there would be clearance to pass. Not that big a deal, its just
    > > that I'm not
    expecting
    > > other riders when coming around corners or pointing downhill.
    > >
    > > Personally I could care less if the trails are uni- or bidirectional,
    I'm
    > > sure any safety benefits are marginal as long as everyone knows what to expect. That said, as
    > > long as they are marked one way I assume people should adhere to them or else constitue a hazard
    > > for those who expect
    the
    > > trail to be clear of oncoming riders. Is riding backwards on a one way trail an etiquitte
    > > breach, a safety issue, an annoynace, or all three?
    Or
    > > am I just too uptight? Intersted to hear other's opinions and related experiences.
    > >
    > > Tom
    > >
    > >
    > I am with you, I find it annoying. most of the trails where I live are bi-directional, So I try to
    > follow the up-down rule (if you are going uphill you have the right of way, those going downhill
    > should pull to the side, because they can start up easier.) Although I think I am the only person
    > who knows that rule. On todays ride, I was irked to see horses on a tight twisty singletrack. I
    > said something to my co-rider, and he shrugged it off saying it doesn't matter, I disagree, if
    > 1500 pound horses continue to use the singletrack, it will get wider and wider until it isn't a
    > singletrack but a horse trail! So the rules are there for a reason, and they should be followed.
    > If riders continue to pass each other in opposite directions, the trail will certainly get wider
    > and wider.
    >
    > --
    > Jerry [email protected] remove the nospam and the period to email me.
     
  7. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "tcmedara" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Michael Dart" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > Perhaps it may be time for the management of the park to reverse the
    > > usual riding direction. You could talk to the managers about it. It
    > would
    > > seem the riders are bored with riding it one way or find it 'easier' to
    > ride
    > > it in that direction.
    > >
    > > Mike
    > >
    > >
    > A damn fine suggestion. Easier - no. Bored - probably (Like the Inuit people who have dozens of
    > words to describe white, we who live in the coastal plane can give you quite a few to decribe
    > flat!). I know just who to talk to. Thanks
    >

    Cheers! I hope it all sorts out. I'm right on the 'fall line' here in Richmond Va and know all about
    coastal plains and vertically challenged.

    Mike
     
  8. Tcmedara

    Tcmedara Guest

    "Michael Dart" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > snip< Cheers! I hope it all sorts out. I'm right on the 'fall line' here in Richmond Va and know
    > all about coastal plains and vertically challenged.
    >
    > Mike
    >
    >
    I'm just down the road on the peninsula. Normally don't venture much past Williamsburg when out for
    a ride, but I want to check out Pocahontas one of these weekends. Some of the better rides are still
    closed down here from the storm, so I'm sure that's why the knucklehead brigades are more prevalent
    on the trails that are open.

    Tom
     
  9. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "tcmedara" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Michael Dart" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > snip< Cheers! I hope it all sorts out. I'm right on the 'fall line' here in Richmond Va and know
    > > all about coastal plains and vertically challenged.
    > >
    > > Mike
    > >
    > >
    > I'm just down the road on the peninsula. Normally don't venture much past Williamsburg when out
    > for a ride, but I want to check out Pocahontas one
    of
    > these weekends. Some of the better rides are still closed down here from the storm, so I'm sure
    > that's why the knucklehead brigades are more prevalent on the trails that are open.
    >
    > Tom
    >
    >

    Oh right. I knew that! Email me direct when you come up I'll give you a 'Tour de Richmond.' We've
    seen a lot of Peninsula riders coming up here too.

    Mike
     
  10. On Sun, 30 Nov 2003 19:35:17 -0500, "tcmedara" <[email protected]> wrote:

    .The local city park has about 7 miles of dedicated mountain bike trail. .Nothing spectacular, but
    fun to ride and only ten minutes from my house. .The trails consists of three loops of singletrack
    linked by a fire road. .All three loops are marked with entrances from the fire road, and the exits
    .back onto the road are posted with good-sized "Do Not Enter" signs. The .intent is obviously to
    have one way traffic on the singletrack portions of .the trail. . .Over the past few weeks, I've
    passed over a dozen riders coming at me from .the wrong direction. The first few surprised the hell
    out of me, then I .started commenting on the way by, something like, "Hey, this is a one-way .loop,"
    or "wrong direction," or "travel goes this way." Usually I just got .a blank stare in return. On
    today's ride, I just rode by without commenting .as it seems I'm fighting a losing battle. . .I must
    say that most have has politely pulled off to the side to let me .pass, a sort of tacit
    acknowledgement that I had the right of way. None the .less, it still irks me a bit. My biggest beef
    is that I'm not expecting .someone to be coming at me with a closure rate of 20+mph on a skinny
    forest .track. My assumption on a one way trail is that there wont't be any riders .coming at me.
    Everytime it happens it gives me a bit of a start, and .several times I've been forced to brake to
    make sure there would be .clearance to pass. Not that big a deal, its just that I'm not expecting
    .other riders when coming around corners or pointing downhill. . .Personally I could care less if
    the trails are uni- or bidirectional, I'm .sure any safety benefits are marginal as long as everyone
    knows what to .expect. That said, as long as they are marked one way I assume people .should adhere
    to them or else constitue a hazard for those who expect the .trail to be clear of oncoming riders.
    Is riding backwards on a one way .trail an etiquitte breach, a safety issue, an annoynace, or all
    three? Or .am I just too uptight?

    You expect MOUNTAIN BIKERS to obey the law?????????????? ROTFL

    Intersted to hear other's opinions and related .experiences. . .Tom .

    ===
    I am working on creating wildlife habitat that is off-limits to humans ("pure habitat"). Want to
    help? (I spent the previous 8 years fighting auto dependence and road construction.)

    http://home.pacbell.net/mjvande
     
  11. Tcmedara

    Tcmedara Guest

    "Mikey spewed:
    > You expect MOUNTAIN BIKERS to obey the law?????????????? ROTFL
    >
    .
    >
    Wow! An honest-to-goodness unsolicited Mikey V response to one of my original posts. I've only been
    posting here for a few months, so it feels almost like a right of passage. Its one thing to feed the
    troll, but its another to actually draw him out of his delusional cave and have him comment on a
    real conversational thread. I'm so proud!

    BTW Mikey -- I am a mountain biker and I do obey the law (okay....there have been a few speeding
    tickets over the years.) Are you now going to call me a liar? Please!!! Then I'll really feel like
    I'm part of the club! I figure I can't really call myself a true citizen of AM-B until my character
    has been denigrated by the resident whack-job.

    Tom
     
  12. tcmedara wrote:
    > "Mikey spewed:
    >> You expect MOUNTAIN BIKERS to obey the law?????????????? ROTFL
    >>
    > .
    >>
    > Wow! An honest-to-goodness unsolicited Mikey V response to one of my original posts. I've only
    > been posting here for a few months, so it feels almost like a right of passage. Its one thing to
    > feed the troll, but its another to actually draw him out of his delusional cave and have him
    > comment on a real conversational thread. I'm so proud!
    >
    > BTW Mikey -- I am a mountain biker and I do obey the law (okay....there have been a few speeding
    > tickets over the years.) Are you now going to call me a liar? Please!!! Then I'll really feel like
    > I'm part of the club! I figure I can't really call myself a true citizen of AM-B until my
    > character has been denigrated by the resident whack-job.
    >
    > Tom

    All I can say is congratulations and of course tell you how envious I am.

    --
    Perre

    You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
     
  13. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "tcmedara" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Mikey spewed:
    > > You expect MOUNTAIN BIKERS to obey the law?????????????? ROTFL
    > >
    > .
    > >
    > Wow! An honest-to-goodness unsolicited Mikey V response to one of my original posts. I've only
    > been posting here for a few months, so it
    feels
    > almost like a right of passage. Its one thing to feed the troll, but its another to actually draw
    > him out of his delusional cave and have him
    comment
    > on a real conversational thread. I'm so proud!
    >
    > BTW Mikey -- I am a mountain biker and I do obey the law (okay....there
    have
    > been a few speeding tickets over the years.) Are you now going to call me
    a
    > liar? Please!!! Then I'll really feel like I'm part of the club! I
    figure
    > I can't really call myself a true citizen of AM-B until my character has been denigrated by the
    > resident whack-job.
    >
    > Tom
    >
    >

    Hehehe...wait until you've been made "An example of...".

    http://tinyurl.com/xch4

    or a "Death Threat" like this one...hehehehe...it still cracks me up!

    http://tinyurl.com/xchm

    Mike
     
  14. Jd

    Jd Guest

    "tcmedara" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Is riding backwards on a one way trail an etiquitte breach, a safety issue, an annoynace, or
    > all three?

    If they must ride it opposite the suggested direction, they must yield.

    JD
     
  15. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    "Michael Dart" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > We have a one way system here. Occasionally I'll ride it backwards

    You aren't tying to tell us you've been riding _UPHILL_ are you? Bwaaaahahahahahahah!


    Shaun aRe
     
  16. Bake

    Bake Guest

    Quite simply find out who is in charge of the trail and let them know. Riding the wrong direction on
    a trail marked as such is poor etiquette.
     
  17. On Mon, 1 Dec 2003 21:28:55 -0500, "tcmedara" <[email protected]> wrote:

    . ."Mikey spewed: .> You expect MOUNTAIN BIKERS to obey the law?????????????? ROTFL .> .. .> .Wow!
    An honest-to-goodness unsolicited Mikey V response to one of my .original posts. I've only been
    posting here for a few months, so it feels .almost like a right of passage. Its one thing to feed
    the troll, but its .another to actually draw him out of his delusional cave and have him comment .on
    a real conversational thread. I'm so proud! . .BTW Mikey -- I am a mountain biker and I do obey the
    law (okay....there have .been a few speeding tickets over the years.) Are you now going to call me a
    .liar? Please!!! Then I'll really feel like I'm part of the club! I figure .I can't really call
    myself a true citizen of AM-B until my character has .been denigrated by the resident whack-job.

    In my experience, yes, 100% of mountain bikers lie. CONSTANTLY.

    .Tom .

    ===
    I am working on creating wildlife habitat that is off-limits to humans ("pure habitat"). Want to
    help? (I spent the previous 8 years fighting auto dependence and road construction.)

    http://home.pacbell.net/mjvande
     
  18. Mike Vandeman wrote:
    > In my experience, yes, 100% of mountain bikers lie. CONSTANTLY.

    Sorry mikey boy. You are the lier and the above statement proves that beyond any doubt. I
    believe most sane people would agree with me that it is not realistically possible for 100% of a
    group of people to constantly lie even if they tried to. Whooooops. I forgot, you're not sane.
    Never mind mikey

    --
    Perre

    You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
     
  19. Brett Jaffee

    Brett Jaffee Guest

    "Per Elmsäter" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > Mike Vandeman wrote:
    >> In my experience, yes, 100% of mountain bikers lie. CONSTANTLY.
    >
    > Sorry mikey boy. You are the lier and the above statement proves that beyond any doubt. I believe
    > most sane people would agree with me that it is not realistically possible for 100% of a group of
    > people to constantly lie even if they tried to.

    Everything I say is a lie.
     
  20. Tcmedara

    Tcmedara Guest

    "Mike Vandeman" hallucinated:
    > In my experience, yes, 100% of mountain bikers lie. CONSTANTLY.
    >

    Constantly? Damn, don't let my wife find out.

    Actually Mikey, a statement like that just proves you need to get out more and interact with real
    people rather than just your therapist. And no... squirrels, chipmunks, whipsnakes, and you're
    imaginary hand-puppet don't count. C'mon buddy, put down the can of cheeze whiz, shower, change
    you're stained batman briefs, put on something besides your footie pajamas and go try and meet some
    real people.
     
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