Trailer decision help needed!



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Myra Vaninwegen

Guest
[email protected] (Myra VanInwegen) wrote
> I think we've pretty much decided to get a 1-child trailer. ... I also really like the look of the
> Chariot 1-child trailers (the Cheetah and Cougar) ... However, we haven't completely ruled out the
> Burley 1-child trailer, the Solo. We will have a good look at them both this weekend, as we wander
> up to Little Thetford (about 10 miles north of Cambridge) to visit Kevin at D.Tek.
>
> We eventually want to have two kids, but we figure that when #2 comes along, we can deal with that
> then, by getting a second-hand two-child trailer, or putting a child seat on a trike of some kind.

Well, after looking at both the Chariot Cheetah and the Burley Solo, we've decided on the Burley. It
can be converted to something with three wheels, but it's by simply putting a little wheel at the
front of the towing arm: not nearly as robust as the Cheetah 3-wheel jogger kit, or as maneuverable
as the Cheetah stroller kit.

But we realized that its main use will be to take the kiddie along to the shops downtown, and the
much larger cargo capacity of the Burley would be of great benefit in transporting the groceries and
other purchases. It would also be better for touring, should we decide to take the kiddie touring.

We realize that we in fact could use a two-child trailer on our normal route into town. A couple
with such a trailer came to visit us over the weekend, and with great care they could fit their
two-child trailer through those critical bollards. Still, I think we'll stick with the idea of a
1-child trailer, to make those tight squeezes less painful, and worry about what to do with #2, when
#2 comes along...

Rory wrote:
> I saw a "single track" child trailer in a German magazine at the weekend, with only one wheel and
> full sus - that might be a good option for one kid (less friction, width, etc.). I'll dig it out
> and look it up on the web if anyone is interested.

Eeek! This is definitely what I would not want in a child trailer. I want two wheels, so that even
if the bike tips over, kiddie stays upright and giggles at Mommy struggling to extract herself from
the bike which has slipped on wet leaves...

-Myra
 
C

Chris French

Guest
In message <[email protected]>, Myra VanInwegen
<[email protected]> writes
>
>Well, after looking at both the Chariot Cheetah and the Burley Solo, we've decided on the Burley.

>But we realized that its main use will be to take the kiddie along to the shops downtown, and the
>much larger cargo capacity of the Burley would be of great benefit in transporting the groceries
>and other purchases.

Elinor tends to make a fuss if I try to stuff to much shopping into her trailer.......... She seems
to think she should have it all to herself.

> Still, I think we'll stick with the idea of a 1-child trailer, to make those tight squeezes less
> painful, and worry about what to do with #2, when #2 comes along...
>
Tag another single trailer behind the first one?
--
Chris French, Leeds
 
R

Rory

Guest
[email protected] (Myra VanInwegen) wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> [email protected] (Myra VanInwegen) wrote
> > I think we've pretty much decided to get a 1-child trailer. ... I also really like the look of
> > the Chariot 1-child trailers (the Cheetah and Cougar) ... However, we haven't completely ruled
> > out the Burley 1-child trailer, the Solo. We will have a good look at them both this weekend, as
> > we wander up to Little Thetford (about 10 miles north of Cambridge) to visit Kevin at D.Tek.
> >
> > We eventually want to have two kids, but we figure that when #2 comes along, we can deal with
> > that then, by getting a second-hand two-child trailer, or putting a child seat on a trike of
> > some kind.
>
> Well, after looking at both the Chariot Cheetah and the Burley Solo, we've decided on the Burley.
> It can be converted to something with three wheels, but it's by simply putting a little wheel at
> the front of the towing arm: not nearly as robust as the Cheetah 3-wheel jogger kit, or as
> maneuverable as the Cheetah stroller kit.
>
> But we realized that its main use will be to take the kiddie along to the shops downtown, and the
> much larger cargo capacity of the Burley would be of great benefit in transporting the groceries
> and other purchases. It would also be better for touring, should we decide to take the kiddie
> touring.
>
> We realize that we in fact could use a two-child trailer on our normal route into town. A couple
> with such a trailer came to visit us over the weekend, and with great care they could fit their
> two-child trailer through those critical bollards. Still, I think we'll stick with the idea of a
> 1-child trailer, to make those tight squeezes less painful, and worry about what to do with #2,
> when #2 comes along...
>
> Rory wrote:
> > I saw a "single track" child trailer in a German magazine at the weekend, with only one wheel
> > and full sus - that might be a good option for one kid (less friction, width, etc.). I'll dig it
> > out and look it up on the web if anyone is interested.
>
> Eeek! This is definitely what I would not want in a child trailer. I want two wheels, so that even
> if the bike tips over, kiddie stays upright and giggles at Mommy struggling to extract herself
> from the bike which has slipped on wet leaves...

My thoughts exactly. Although it is supposed to be for off-road, and have a sturdy roll-cage. Hmm,
if it was less than Euro 1500, it might be a bit of fun in the right conditions...
http://www.fahrradpage.de/photos/Eurobike2002/p82.htm
 
G

Gary Knighton

Guest
In article <uEA%[email protected]>, Becka Currant wrote:
> After booking our holiday to France (yippee!) thoughts have now turned to how we will transport
> baby Becka whilst cycling. When we go at the beginning of Sept the child will be about 5 1/2
> months old.
>

Can't go far wrong with a Burley D'Lite (imported by UK Trailer, in Cornwall). External frame which
encloses the wheels (the wheels and axles therefore would not get pranged) and plenty of room for
that extra luggage (5-6 month old babies go through about). The only problem is the price and the
time of year. Refurbished ex-hire trailers are available at about half price in the Autumn which is
past your September requirement time.

Gary

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G

Gary Knighton

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, Myra VanInwegen wrote:
> I think we've pretty much decided to get a 1-child trailer. The main reason for this is that the
> main thing we'd use it for is simply getting the kid around, to shopping trips, day care, etc, and
> our standard route into town involves going along a bike path that has bollards cleverly placed
> such that there's a 78cm gap between them. This rules out most 2-child trailers.
>

Get the local Council to widen that one because 80cm is that width of a standard twin buggy and
many wide wheelchairs. As you have pointed out it is the width of a standard 2-child trailer like
the Burley D'Lite. BTW, is the 78cm width at ground measured at ground level or at about 10 cm
above ground level, the latter would favour trailers with wheels mounted within the frame, like the
Burley D'Lite.

Gary

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G

Gary Knighton

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, Myra VanInwegen wrote:
> We realize that we in fact could use a two-child trailer on our normal route into town. A couple
> with such a trailer came to visit us over the weekend, and with great care they could fit their
> two-child trailer through those critical bollards. Still, I think we'll stick with the idea of a
> 1-child trailer, to make those tight squeezes less painful,
>

One get used to the width and knows exactly where to line up the machines after a little experience.
The curved outer bars of a framed trailer do offer a little assistance should one be up to a
centimetre or so out but wouldn't do it too often or too fast. Mind you I hit a gate post because I
forgot to allow for the trailer, the trailer stopped, the bike stopped moving forward and I was on
the ground much to the hilarity of trailer's occupants.

Gary

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