Trainer, bother with swapping tire?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by [email protected]m, Jan 28, 2006.

  1. For folks out there who use indoor trainers with their normal bike -- I
    just got one of these for the occasional day when it's too cold or
    rainy to ride outside, intending to use my regular bike w/ it.
    However, I've heard you should use a different tire due to high wear.
    Do you guys bother? I'd have to deflate my tube, remove the "road"
    tire, put another on, reinflate, etc.. Sounds like a lot of effort for
    that rainy night when I want to train, considering that I'll be back on
    the road the next day most likely. I could buy a whole other rear
    WHEEL but that would need gears and everything.

    Do most folks just let their tire wear out during the winter?
     
    Tags:


  2. i save old front tires to use on the trainer. it's a pain switching,
    but the trainer does go through tires pretty quickly, so if you have
    nicer tires it might be worth it. Also, if you are riding on the clear
    days in the winter, i have heard that salt can shorten the life of
    tires.
     
  3. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    On 28 Jan 2006 08:40:12 -0800, [email protected] wrote, in part:

    > I could buy a whole other rear
    >WHEEL but that would need gears and everything.


    That's probably the best solution. It doesn't have to be a new or
    top-of-the-line wheel. Throw your old tires on it and it's always
    ready to go. If you've ever seen a bike slip off a trainer's roller,
    you don't want to be running good tires.
    --
    zk
     
  4. Zoot Katz wrote:
    > On 28 Jan 2006 08:40:12 -0800, [email protected] wrote, in part:
    >
    > > I could buy a whole other rear
    > >WHEEL but that would need gears and everything.

    >
    > That's probably the best solution. It doesn't have to be a new or
    > top-of-the-line wheel. Throw your old tires on it and it's always
    > ready to go. If you've ever seen a bike slip off a trainer's roller,
    > you don't want to be running good tires.



    Which brings up the question - do you really need lots of gears on a
    trainer? I mean, if you have an old - for argument's sake - 7 speed
    wheel with the braking surfaces worn down a bit, would it make a good
    roller wheel? I guess I'm assuming you have friction mode as an option,
    and that you don't use the brakes much on rollers.
     
  5. Luke

    Luke Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > For folks out there who use indoor trainers with their normal bike -- I
    > just got one of these for the occasional day when it's too cold or
    > rainy to ride outside, intending to use my regular bike w/ it.
    > However, I've heard you should use a different tire due to high wear.
    > Do you guys bother? I'd have to deflate my tube, remove the "road"
    > tire, put another on, reinflate, etc.. Sounds like a lot of effort for
    > that rainy night when I want to train, considering that I'll be back on
    > the road the next day most likely. I could buy a whole other rear
    > WHEEL but that would need gears and everything.
    >
    > Do most folks just let their tire wear out during the winter?
    >


    My trainer sees the same rubber as the road. Riding a 1UP trainer with
    my regular tires (inexpensive Contis [1]) has not resulted in an
    unacceptable rate of wear; perhaps with costlier tires of softer
    compounds that may change.

    Accordingly, you can comprise; if your current tire's lifespan is
    unacceptably abbreviated by the trainer, opting for a hardier slick
    that can withstand training rigors and still be satisfactory on asphalt
    can avoid resorting to a dedicated training tire or wheel.

    Luke




    1.

    http://www.mec.ca/Products/product_detail.jsp?PRODUCT<>prd_id=845524
    442507693&FOLDER%3C%3Efolder_id=2534374302693841&bmUID=1138595137793

    or

    http://tinyurl.com/ayqou
     
  6. Shaw

    Shaw Guest

    "Brian Huntley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Zoot Katz wrote:
    >> On 28 Jan 2006 08:40:12 -0800, [email protected] wrote, in part:
    >>
    >> > I could buy a whole other rear
    >> >WHEEL but that would need gears and everything.

    >>
    >> That's probably the best solution. It doesn't have to be a new or
    >> top-of-the-line wheel. Throw your old tires on it and it's always
    >> ready to go. If you've ever seen a bike slip off a trainer's roller,
    >> you don't want to be running good tires.

    >
    >
    > Which brings up the question - do you really need lots of gears on a
    > trainer? I mean, if you have an old - for argument's sake - 7 speed
    > wheel with the braking surfaces worn down a bit, would it make a good
    > roller wheel? I guess I'm assuming you have friction mode as an option,
    > and that you don't use the brakes much on rollers.


    I looked at the idea of a new pair of wheelset (complete with Quick release,
    slicks, 9-spd cassette and brake rotors) for my mountain bike for road use.

    A point that someone brought up changed my mind. You will have to consider
    the wear on your chain vs the cassette.
     
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