Trainer damage?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Joel Rose, Feb 3, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Joel Rose

    Joel Rose Guest

    Is there any validity to the idea of a bike being damaged when used on a stationary trainer? I have
    read several posts on other sites that suggest this possibility and since I have recently started to
    use one, I am a little nervous about any damage I could be causing to my bike.

    I only ride seated which seems to keep the bike pretty straight while on the trainer. A friend
    of mine gets out of the saddle and really puts in a big effort on his and I wonder if that is a
    good thing?

    Thanks for any advice or opinions.

    Joel R
     
    Tags:


  2. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "Joel Rose" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:Kmy%[email protected]...
    > Is there any validity to the idea of a bike being damaged when used on a stationary trainer? I
    > have read several posts on other sites that suggest this possibility and since I have recently
    > started to use one, I am a
    little
    > nervous about any damage I could be causing to my bike.
    >
    > I only ride seated which seems to keep the bike pretty straight while on
    the
    > trainer. A friend of mine gets out of the saddle and really puts in a big effort on his and I
    > wonder if that is a good thing?

    We touched on this subject a while ago here. I recall a roller manufacturer casting aspersions (
    without an actual accusation which would have needed some backup) on trainers offhandedly in an ad,
    something like,"Won't twist your frame as trainers may" or some such.

    Having sold literally a couple of thousand of the old style trainers (into which one clamps the bike
    by the fork and behind the BB) and even more ofthe modern ones ( which support the bicycle across
    the rear axle) I have never seen a case of frame damage from a trainer.

    Consider for a moment that even a careful rider subjects the bike to a magnitude more impact on any
    Sunday morning than a trainer ever could. I can't see how a trainer could be a problem for a
    bicycle frame.

    OK, maybe except for possibly clamping the old style clamp on the chainstays until you crimp them -
    but it would take real work to do that.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  3. Joel Rose

    Joel Rose Guest

    Thanks. I know personally it does not seem that any harm is being done to my bike while I'm on the
    trainer. I must have seen a similar ad that stated that trainers are great but...

    Bye for now, J Rose "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Joel Rose" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:Kmy%[email protected]...
    > > Is there any validity to the idea of a bike being damaged when used on a stationary trainer? I
    > > have read several posts on other sites that
    suggest
    > > this possibility and since I have recently started to use one, I am a
    > little
    > > nervous about any damage I could be causing to my bike.
    > >
    > > I only ride seated which seems to keep the bike pretty straight while on
    > the
    > > trainer. A friend of mine gets out of the saddle and really puts in a
    big
    > > effort on his and I wonder if that is a good thing?
    >
    >
    > We touched on this subject a while ago here. I recall a roller
    manufacturer
    > casting aspersions ( without an actual accusation which would have needed some backup) on trainers
    > offhandedly in an ad, something like,"Won't twist your frame as trainers may" or some such.
    >
    > Having sold literally a couple of thousand of the old style trainers (into which one clamps the
    > bike by the fork and behind the BB) and even more
    ofthe
    > modern ones ( which support the bicycle across the rear axle) I have never seen a case of frame
    > damage from a trainer.
    >
    > Consider for a moment that even a careful rider subjects the bike to a magnitude more impact on
    > any Sunday morning than a trainer ever could. I can't see how a trainer could be a problem for a
    > bicycle frame.
    >
    > OK, maybe except for possibly clamping the old style clamp on the
    chainstays
    > until you crimp them - but it would take real work to do that.
    >
    > --
    > Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  4. The special front-wheel QR skewer that came with my Tacx trainer bent pretty good while I was using
    the trainer. I had both the skewer and the stand screwed in pretty tight, so I'm not sure what
    happened. I noticed it when I was putting the regular skewer back in. Does this harm the wheel?

    Jens

    "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "Joel Rose" <[email protected]> wrote in message>
    news:Kmy%[email protected]...
    > > Is there any validity to the idea of a bike being damaged when used on a stationary trainer? I
    > > have read several posts on other sites that
    suggest
    > > this possibility and since I have recently started to use one, I am a
    > little
    > > nervous about any damage I could be causing to my bike.
    > >
    > > I only ride seated which seems to keep the bike pretty straight while on
    > the
    > > trainer. A friend of mine gets out of the saddle and really puts in a
    big
    > > effort on his and I wonder if that is a good thing?
    >
    >
    > We touched on this subject a while ago here. I recall a roller
    manufacturer
    > casting aspersions ( without an actual accusation which would have needed some backup) on trainers
    > offhandedly in an ad, something like,"Won't twist your frame as trainers may" or some such.
    >
    > Having sold literally a couple of thousand of the old style trainers (into which one clamps the
    > bike by the fork and behind the BB) and even more
    ofthe
    > modern ones ( which support the bicycle across the rear axle) I have never seen a case of frame
    > damage from a trainer.
    >
    > Consider for a moment that even a careful rider subjects the bike to a magnitude more impact on
    > any Sunday morning than a trainer ever could. I can't see how a trainer could be a problem for a
    > bicycle frame.
    >
    > OK, maybe except for possibly clamping the old style clamp on the
    chainstays
    > until you crimp them - but it would take real work to do that.
    >
    > --
    > Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  5. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On Mon, 3 Feb 2003 13:18:09 -0500, "Joel Rose" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Is there any validity to the idea of a bike being damaged when used on a stationary trainer? I have
    >read several posts on other sites that suggest this possibility and since I have recently started
    >to use one, I am a little nervous about any damage I could be causing to my bike.

    I've noticed that some score up the ends of the rear skewer. :-(

    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
  6. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > > "Joel Rose" <[email protected]> wrote in message>
    > news:Kmy%[email protected]...
    > > > Is there any validity to the idea of a bike being damaged when used on
    a
    > > > stationary trainer? I have read several posts on other sites that
    > suggest
    > > > this possibility and since I have recently started to use one, I am a
    > > little
    > > > nervous about any damage I could be causing to my bike.
    > > >
    > > > I only ride seated which seems to keep the bike pretty straight while
    on
    > > the
    > > > trainer. A friend of mine gets out of the saddle and really puts in a
    > big
    > > > effort on his and I wonder if that is a good thing?

    ([email protected]) offered:
    > > We touched on this subject a while ago here. I recall a roller
    > manufacturer
    > > casting aspersions ( without an actual accusation which would have
    needed
    > > some backup) on trainers offhandedly in an ad, something like,"Won't
    twist
    > > your frame as trainers may" or some such.
    > >
    > > Having sold literally a couple of thousand of the old style trainers
    (into
    > > which one clamps the bike by the fork and behind the BB) and even more
    > ofthe
    > > modern ones ( which support the bicycle across the rear axle) I have
    never
    > > seen a case of frame damage from a trainer.
    > >
    > > Consider for a moment that even a careful rider subjects the bike to a magnitude more impact on
    > > any Sunday morning than a trainer ever could. I can't see how a trainer could be a problem for a
    > > bicycle frame.
    > >
    > > OK, maybe except for possibly clamping the old style clamp on the
    > chainstays
    > > until you crimp them - but it would take real work to do that.

    "Jens Kurt Heycke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:lJQ%[email protected]...
    > The special front-wheel QR skewer that came with my Tacx trainer bent pretty good while I was
    > using the trainer. I had both the skewer and the stand screwed in pretty tight, so I'm not sure
    > what happened. I noticed it when I was putting the regular skewer back in. Does this
    harm
    > the wheel?

    I don't see how it can damage the wheel. But a skewer that's bent reflects likley having been
    installed not-quite-tight-enough or perhaps askew (maybe on top of a Saf-Tee lip??).

    Add a drop of oil on the cam and the threads and ensure you're locking it just as you would any
    other skewer - hard enough to see the print of the lever on your palm for a few seconds ( but less
    than a purple mark!).

    The wheel's surely OK but I would look at the fork tips if the skewer slipped in use. Are they
    parallel? That is a concern, but still much less serious than a loose skewer out of the saddle
    in traffic!
    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...