Trainer that generates electricity?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by John Smith, Jun 16, 2003.

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  1. John Smith

    John Smith Guest

    Just wondering if such a thing exists. Seems a shame to waste all that potentially useful energy...
    Plus, such a gadget would multiply the greenhouse-gas reduction resulting from the use of bicycles.

    Arthur
    ------------------------------------------------
    [email protected]
     
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  2. Pbwalther

    Pbwalther Guest

    Well people just don't generate that much power on a bicycle. I think about enough to power a light
    bulb or maybe a fan.

    It would also be cumbersome to hook you bike up to a generator. And then what would you do with the
    electricity? Charge batteries? Or would you patch into the electrical grid and make deals with the
    electrical utilities and the government? And all this for a nano electrical generating facility?
     
  3. Pbwalther wrote:
    >
    > Well people just don't generate that much power on a bicycle. I think about enough to power a
    > light bulb or maybe a fan.
    >
    > It would also be cumbersome to hook you bike up to a generator. And then what would you do with
    > the electricity? Charge batteries? Or would you patch into the electrical grid and make deals with
    > the electrical utilities and the government? And all this for a nano electrical generating
    > facility?

    If you had a light that used a rechargeable battery you could try to hook the recharger into it...

    -shane
     
  4. "John Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Just wondering if such a thing exists. Seems a shame to waste all that potentially useful
    > energy... Plus, such a gadget would multiply the greenhouse-gas reduction resulting from the use
    > of bicycles.
    >
    That would depend on how much methane you produce while on a bike, and whether you use air
    conditioning to cool yourself while working on the trainer.
     
  5. Archer

    Archer Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > "John Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Just wondering if such a thing exists. Seems a shame to waste all that potentially useful
    > > energy... Plus, such a gadget would multiply the greenhouse-gas reduction resulting from the use
    > > of bicycles.
    > >
    > That would depend on how much methane you produce while on a bike, and whether you use air
    > conditioning to cool yourself while working on the trainer.

    How about using the electricity you generate to run a fan to keep you cool?

    --
    David Kerber An optimist says "Good morning, Lord." While a pessimist says "Good Lord,
    it's morning".

    Remove the ns_ from the address before e-mailing.
     
  6. Pete

    Pete Guest

    "archer" <[email protected]_hotmail.com> wrote

    >
    > How about using the electricity you generate to run a fan to keep you cool?

    Or skip the power loss from producing the electricity, and instead run the fan directly, via a belt.

    Fan speed is then directly proportional to pedaling speed, just as it is on the road. I believe
    there are addons for rollers to power a fan.

    Pete
     
  7. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Mon, 16 Jun 2003 12:29:11 +0200, <[email protected]>, "John Smith"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Just wondering if such a thing exists. Seems a shame to waste all that potentially useful energy...
    >Plus, such a gadget would multiply the greenhouse-gas reduction resulting from the use of bicycles.
    >
    >
    >Arthur
    >------------------------------------------------
    >[email protected]
    >
    The East Van Chopper Festival was a block party held over the weekend. The sound system for the
    event was pedal powered for ten solid hours.

    Four different machines and at least a hundred pedalling persons were used to turn the electrical
    motors that were gizmoed into generators.

    One rig was a road bike on a trainer with the motor pulley attached right to the resistance wheel.
    There was a pile of black rubber dust generated as well.

    A second machine was a bicycle whose rear wheel had been replaced by an aluminium flywheel turning a
    pulley wheel on the motor. It too was attached to a trainer stand.

    A third machine was an old front wheel drive stationary exercise machine. The resistance wheel drove
    the motor pulley.

    There was a recumbent device that I didn't investigate very closely. It had an office chair and
    laptop computer attached where proper bicycle steering and seating devices would normally be found.

    Ideally the voltage was maintained between 13.5 and 14.5 volts. This charged a battery. When we'd
    hit 15 volts the circuit would cut out.

    It's a low budget experimental development cobbled mostly from scrap. The next rendition will use
    the excess voltage to power lighting effects.

    With 3 cyclists it was easy to let the voltage drop below 13.5 during louder passages of the music.
    One planned improvemt to the system will incorporate a voltmeter for each bike. A larger event will
    likely require more cyclists, dynamosaurs, and generating rigs.
    --
    zk
     
  8. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On Mon, 16 Jun 2003 14:56:33 -0700, Zoot Katz <[email protected]> from Balsa Pacific Aero Ltd.
    Engineering & Bicycle Mongery wrote:

    >The East Van Chopper Festival was a block party held over the weekend. The sound system for the
    >event was pedal powered for ten solid hours.

    Photos up on the web anywhere?

    --
    http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace I wonder if BOB GUCCIONE has these problems!
    5:20:24 PM 16 June 2003
     
  9. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Mon, 16 Jun 2003 17:20:50 -0500, <[email protected]>, Kevan Smith
    <[email protected]/\/\> wrote:

    >On Mon, 16 Jun 2003 14:56:33 -0700, Zoot Katz <[email protected]> from Balsa Pacific Aero Ltd.
    >Engineering & Bicycle Mongery wrote:
    >
    >>The East Van Chopper Festival was a block party held over the weekend. The sound system for the
    >>event was pedal powered for ten solid hours.
    >
    >Photos up on the web anywhere?

    Nun dot hive scene. . . yet.

    Last year the cops removed the barricades. This year we got a permit. duh!

    No sponsors, no logos, no hype.

    The block is on a bike route and around the corner from a popular ice-cream parlour with a patio so
    there were lots of curiosity seekers and hapless wanderers finding there way onto wacked out bikes.

    BIG FUN!
    --
    zk
     
  10. Amg

    Amg Guest

    > > How about using the electricity you generate to run a fan to keep you cool?
    >
    > Or skip the power loss from producing the electricity, and instead run the fan directly,
    > via a belt.
    >
    > Fan speed is then directly proportional to pedaling speed, just as it is
    on
    > the road. I believe there are addons for rollers to power a fan.
    >

    >> That would depend on how much methane you produce while on a bike, and whether you use air
    >> conditioning to cool yourself while working on the trainer.

    >The East Van Chopper Festival was a block party held over the weekend. The sound system for the
    >event was pedal powered for ten solid hours.

    Sheesh, lots of interesting replies here! The only thing that occurs to me is that a trainer is
    perhaps more likely to be used in the winter, when the fan (or AC) is not so essential...

    Re the Chopper Festival, I estimate that an individual cyclist might produce about 100 watts of
    continuous power, enough to light a bulb to read by. Wire up ten cyclists and you could run a
    thousand-watt sound system. All of this is not much in terms of dollars and cents, of course. Ten
    hours of one cyclist pedaling would produce one kilowatt-hour of electricity, worth what? --maybe 20
    cents from Con Ed. But saving money per se is not the point, really...

    --------------------
     
  11. I see someone else here is old enough to remember "Gilligan's Island" .
    %°>

    Elisa Roselli Paris, France

    Arthur wrote:

    > Just wondering if such a thing exists. Seems a shame to waste all that potentially useful
    > energy...
     
  12. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Tue, 17 Jun 2003 09:32:22 +0200, <[email protected]>, "AMG"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Ten hours of one cyclist pedaling would produce one kilowatt-hour of electricity, worth what?
    >--maybe 20 cents from Con Ed. But saving money per se is not the point, really...

    Ten hours of pedalling costs more in bottled water than the fuel to run a generator.

    It's the problem that sitting on a trainer is a waste of time and/or energy that is resolved. One
    has _something_ to show for their effort.

    I think if a person charged their headlamp batteries while on their trainers they'd be putting good
    use to that "something" they gained from an otherwise wasted energy expenditure. By doing so you
    would reap the output of your effort thus returning the normal balance usually found in cycling's
    many subtle rewards.

    I've taken this opportunity to edit and comment, for accuracy and possibly more clarity, that part
    my previous post describing the machines. \--------- One rig was a road bike on a trainer with the
    motor pulley acting as the resistance wheel. The tire rode in the V-groove of the pulley. It
    generated a pile of black rubber dust. Having a selection of gear ratios was its best feature.

    A second machine was a bicycle whose rear wheel had been replaced by an aluminium flywheel with
    a belt turning the pulley wheel on a motor. It too was attached to a trainer stand and was
    hardest to pedal.

    A third machine was an old front wheel drive stationary exercise machine. The resistance wheel was
    attached directly to the motor shaft. ---------/ Disclaimer: That's what I remember they looked
    like. I'll post links to images when and if there are any. I never gave any of the machines or
    circuitry a really close inspection though I pedalled three out of four.

    When it was down to two machines you had to hope the other guy was fresh because it was spin-city
    until a third bike came on stream. With four bikes it was a leisurely pace with minimal load.
    --
    zk
     
  13. > Ten hours of pedalling costs more in bottled water than the fuel to run a generator.

    Yeah, that water sure is expensive...maybe they should pipe it to everyone's house. Perhaps that
    would be cheaper.... :)

    Peter
     
  14. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

  15. Sojourner

    Sojourner Guest

    John Smith wrote:
    > Just wondering if such a thing exists. Seems a shame to waste all that potentially useful
    > energy... Plus, such a gadget would multiply the greenhouse-gas reduction resulting from the use
    > of bicycles.

    I had a friend who took either an old bicycle or an old exercise bike and hooked it up to generate
    power for the TV set. I think there was a battery in there as well (or possibly a series of
    batteries).

    The only way anybody in the house would be allowed to watch TV was to sit and ride, ride, ride...
    otherwise there was no power for the TV.

    It did not totally eliminate tv-watching in his house, but his kids were EXTREMELY selective about
    what they would watch - and there were no couch potatoes! NO fat little kids who get winded going
    around the block one time ... LOL!
     
  16. Sojourner <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I had a friend who took either an old bicycle or an old exercise bike and hooked it up to generate
    > power for the TV set. I think there was a battery in there as well (or possibly a series of
    > batteries).
    >
    > The only way anybody in the house would be allowed to watch TV was to sit and ride, ride, ride...
    > otherwise there was no power for the TV.
    >

    Could you post some details? I've been thinking about doing this in my house, and would love to copy
    someone else's successful model, instead of trying to come up with my own :)

    thanks,

    -Mujtaba

    > It did not totally eliminate tv-watching in his house, but his kids were EXTREMELY selective about
    > what they would watch - and there were no couch potatoes! NO fat little kids who get winded going
    > around the block one time ... LOL!
     
  17. F1

    F1 Guest

    Oh, come on Pete, you're ruining their fun...

    "Pete" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "archer" <[email protected]_hotmail.com> wrote
    >
    > >
    > > How about using the electricity you generate to run a fan to keep you cool?
    >
    > Or skip the power loss from producing the electricity, and instead run the fan directly,
    > via a belt.
    >
    > Fan speed is then directly proportional to pedaling speed, just as it is
    on
    > the road. I believe there are addons for rollers to power a fan.
    >
    > Pete
     
  18. On Tue, 17 Jun 2003 22:08:49 -0400, Peter Gardner <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> Ten hours of pedalling costs more in bottled water than the fuel to run a generator.
    >
    >Yeah, that water sure is expensive...maybe they should pipe it to everyone's house. Perhaps that
    >would be cheaper.... :)

    Having been to the US recently, though: USian tapwater is not really fit for human consumption. YOu
    guys put *chlorine* in there? Ew.

    Jasper
     
  19. Archer

    Archer Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > On Tue, 17 Jun 2003 22:08:49 -0400, Peter Gardner <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >> Ten hours of pedalling costs more in bottled water than the fuel to run a generator.
    > >
    > >Yeah, that water sure is expensive...maybe they should pipe it to everyone's house. Perhaps that
    > >would be cheaper.... :)
    >
    > Having been to the US recently, though: USian tapwater is not really fit for human consumption.
    > YOu guys put *chlorine* in there? Ew.

    Some towns do, some don't; it depends on how clean the original source
    is. Most areas which get their water from aquifers don't. Most surface water supplies need at least
    a small amount of chlorine as a disinfectant, though not all.

    --
    David Kerber An optimist says "Good morning, Lord." While a pessimist says "Good Lord,
    it's morning".

    Remove the ns_ from the address before e-mailing.
     
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