Trainer Workout Harder Than Road Workout

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Al Kubeluis, Mar 4, 2003.

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  1. Al Kubeluis

    Al Kubeluis Guest

    Hi Hammerheads, Using heart rate monitor and physical stress to gauge workout difficulty, I'm
    finding that indoor workouts using CycleOps Fluid trainer and Corsa are more difficult than similar
    road workouts. I'm doing similar warm-ups and interval lengths and cadence. Indoor workouts in my
    large, well-ventilated garage are at about 50F. Dressing appropriate to temperature in indoor and
    outdoor workouts. Perhaps I'm just working harder indoors and not aware of doing so. But any ideas
    or literature or similar experiences as to why indoor may be harder would be appreciated? Thanks.
    ~~~al.kubeluis..md.usa.earth.sun.milkyway.virgo.universe..corsa~~~
     
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  2. Akensmith

    Akensmith Guest

    > But any ideas or literature or similar experiences as to why indoor may be
    harder would be appreciated?>>

    Al,

    At the risk of pointing out the obvious, there are no hills, either up or down in your garage.
    When I ride the rollers in the hallway with a fan and heart rate monitor, I can work without the
    brief rest periods I would get when riding down a hill, coasting to a stop light, etc. So it's
    entirely possible you're getting a more vigorous workout indoors than you would riding for the
    same time outdoors.

    Norm
     
  3. Al Kubeluis

    Al Kubeluis Guest

    Hi Norm, Good point, but my road workouts are usually on an 8 mile flat, smooth road with no stops.
    Al "Akensmith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > But any ideas or literature or similar experiences as to why indoor may
    be
    > harder would be appreciated?>>
    >
    > Al,
    >
    > At the risk of pointing out the obvious, there are no hills, either up or
    down
    > in your garage. When I ride the rollers in the hallway with a fan and
    heart
    > rate monitor, I can work without the brief rest periods I would get when
    riding
    > down a hill, coasting to a stop light, etc. So it's entirely possible
    you're
    > getting a more vigorous workout indoors than you would riding for the same
    time
    > outdoors.
    >
    > Norm
     
  4. Paul Bruneau

    Paul Bruneau Guest

    I have used a trainer and a heart monitor both for the first time this winter and I found this:

    Despite training on the trainer at roughly 75-80% of max heart rate for
    1.25 hours several times a week (which would leave me feeling tired, sweaty, breathing good and like
    I accomplished something) for several weeks, when I hit the street on a warmish day, I found that
    my heart rate went straight to 90% (triggering my alarm) on the very first gentle hill. It made me
    think the trainer, although it felt hard, was really nothing compared to a real ride (in my case).

    I'm not sure how this fits with your experience, but I thought I'd share.

    Al Kubeluis wrote:
    > Hi Norm, Good point, but my road workouts are usually on an 8 mile flat, smooth road with no
    > stops. Al "Akensmith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>>But any ideas or literature or similar experiences as to why indoor may
    >
    > be
    >
    >>harder would be appreciated?>>
    >>
    >>Al,
    >>
    >>At the risk of pointing out the obvious, there are no hills, either up or
    >
    > down
    >
    >>in your garage. When I ride the rollers in the hallway with a fan and
    >
    > heart
    >
    >>rate monitor, I can work without the brief rest periods I would get when
    >
    > riding
    >
    >>down a hill, coasting to a stop light, etc. So it's entirely possible
    >
    > you're
    >
    >>getting a more vigorous workout indoors than you would riding for the same
    >
    > time
    >
    >>outdoors.
    >>
    >>Norm
    >>
    >>
    >
     
  5. Pat

    Pat Guest

    [email protected] (Akensmith) wrote in message news:<200[email protected]>...
    > > But any ideas or literature or similar experiences as to why indoor may be
    > harder would be appreciated?>>
    >
    > Al,
    >
    > At the risk of pointing out the obvious, there are no hills, either up or down in your garage.
    > When I ride the rollers in the hallway with a fan and heart rate monitor, I can work without the
    > brief rest periods I would get when riding down a hill, coasting to a stop light, etc. So it's
    > entirely possible you're getting a more vigorous workout indoors than you would riding for the
    > same time outdoors.
    >
    > Norm

    I agree with both Norm and AL, about the potential quality and benefits of stationary training. I
    have been riding rollers through the winter and find it a very beneficial workout. As Norm points
    out, spending an hour on whatever sort of stationary device you choose, can be a pretty intensive
    workout, with few of the natural breaks/rests that you get in an on the road riding. While commuting
    has a great many benefits aside from the physical conditioning that it provides, I find that I get a
    much better workout for an hour on the rollers than I do in commuting, although I also commute on a
    limited basis. The challenge with stationary riding is the boredom issue and the fact that although
    you do get a good workout, you cannot rely (nor would you wnat to) on station training as a
    replacement for spending time on the road. I try to get out on the road at least once a week during
    the winter.

    Pat Mc
     
  6. I recommend you get a book that has structured workouts in it, such as "The Heart Rate Monitor
    Book for Cyclists" by Sally Edwards, or "Smart Cycling" by Arnie Baker. These make the time go by
    fast. You can also track performance improvements easier than on the road. Regards, Greg
    Dorfmeier, RANS V2

    [email protected] (Pat) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > [email protected] (Akensmith) wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > But any ideas or literature or similar experiences as to why indoor may be
    > > harder would be appreciated?>>
    > >
    > > Al,
    > >
    > > At the risk of pointing out the obvious, there are no hills, either up or down in your garage.
    > > When I ride the rollers in the hallway with a fan and heart rate monitor, I can work without the
    > > brief rest periods I would get when riding down a hill, coasting to a stop light, etc. So it's
    > > entirely possible you're getting a more vigorous workout indoors than you would riding for the
    > > same time outdoors.
    > >
    > > Norm
    >
    >
    > I agree with both Norm and AL, about the potential quality and benefits of stationary training. I
    > have been riding rollers through the winter and find it a very beneficial workout. As Norm points
    > out, spending an hour on whatever sort of stationary device you choose, can be a pretty intensive
    > workout, with few of the natural breaks/rests that you get in an on the road riding. While
    > commuting has a great many benefits aside from the physical conditioning that it provides, I find
    > that I get a much better workout for an hour on the rollers than I do in commuting, although I
    > also commute on a limited basis. The challenge with stationary riding is the boredom issue and the
    > fact that although you do get a good workout, you cannot rely (nor would you wnat to) on station
    > training as a replacement for spending time on the road. I try to get out on the road at least
    > once a week during the winter.
    >
    > Pat Mc
     
  7. John Riley

    John Riley Guest

    I think it might be about cooling. Even though the garage is cool, there is no breeze. You could try
    trainer workouts with a big fan and without to see if it made a difference.

    John Riley

    "Al Kubeluis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi Hammerheads, Using heart rate monitor and physical stress to gauge workout difficulty, I'm
    > finding that indoor workouts using CycleOps Fluid trainer and Corsa are more difficult than
    > similar road workouts. I'm doing similar warm-ups and interval lengths and cadence. Indoor
    > workouts in my large, well-ventilated garage are at about 50F. Dressing appropriate to temperature
    > in indoor and outdoor workouts. Perhaps I'm just working harder indoors and not aware of doing so.
    > But any ideas or literature or similar experiences as to why indoor may be harder would be
    > appreciated? Thanks. ~~~al.kubeluis..md.usa.earth.sun.milkyway.virgo.universe..corsa~~~
     
  8. Al Kubeluis

    Al Kubeluis Guest

    Hi Greg, Yes, Edwards-Reed HRM book is very useful, as is HRM. Yes also regarding performance
    improvements. My pedaling style has improved noticeably due to trainer and to headrest. I have
    smoothened pedal stroke and body rocking motion especially under stress. The reasons that trainer
    and headrest have helped is feedback. When pedaling motion is uneven, trainer rocks and head moves
    against headrest.
    --
    ~~~al.kubeluis..md.usa.earth.sun.milkyway.virgo.universe..corsa~~~

    "Greg Dorfmeier" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I recommend you get a book that has structured workouts in it, such as "The Heart Rate Monitor
    > Book for Cyclists" by Sally Edwards, or "Smart Cycling" by Arnie Baker. These make the time go by
    > fast. You can also track performance improvements easier than on the road. Regards, Greg
    > Dorfmeier, RANS V2
    >
    > [email protected] (Pat) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > [email protected] (Akensmith) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > > But any ideas or literature or similar experiences as to why indoor
    may be
    > > > harder would be appreciated?>>
    > > >
    > > > Al,
    > > >
    > > > At the risk of pointing out the obvious, there are no hills, either up
    or down
    > > > in your garage. When I ride the rollers in the hallway with a fan and
    heart
    > > > rate monitor, I can work without the brief rest periods I would get
    when riding
    > > > down a hill, coasting to a stop light, etc. So it's entirely possible
    you're
    > > > getting a more vigorous workout indoors than you would riding for the
    same time
    > > > outdoors.
    > > >
    > > > Norm
    > >
    > >
    > > I agree with both Norm and AL, about the potential quality and benefits of stationary training.
    > > I have been riding rollers through the winter and find it a very beneficial workout. As Norm
    > > points out, spending an hour on whatever sort of stationary device you choose, can be a pretty
    > > intensive workout, with few of the natural breaks/rests that you get in an on the road riding.
    > > While commuting has a great many benefits aside from the physical conditioning that it provides,
    > > I find that I get a much better workout for an hour on the rollers than I do in commuting,
    > > although I also commute on a limited basis. The challenge with stationary riding is the boredom
    > > issue and the fact that although you do get a good workout, you cannot rely (nor would you wnat
    > > to) on station training as a replacement for spending time on the road. I try to get out on the
    > > road at least once a week during the winter.
    > >
    > > Pat Mc
     
  9. Hi Al,

    I've come to the point that my main goal in riding is for personal improvement and performance. I
    enjoy riding with others, but haven't found all that many bent riders who ride for performance. Or
    if they do, it's hard to work out schedules to ride together. I've also discovered that endless low
    effort miles really don't increase performance. This will be my third year on the V2, and I'm going
    to use the trainer for about three work outs a week, which leaves one day a week for the long ride.
    I'm following Joe Friels guidelines in "Cycling Past 50" and will see how it goes. I'm about .5mph
    average higher than this time last year,up to 18 average on a 55 mile section. My goal is 20 over 68
    miles on the Silver Comet Trail. I'm having fun, and I guess that's what this is all about. Would
    most people want to ride the trainer 3 time a week? No. But I really think focused workouts will
    lead to improvement. I'm sure it can be done on the road, but time is a factor, plus all the other
    things you have to put up with outside. Maybe if I lived in Texas and had wide open roads to ride.
    Let us know how your work outs on the trainer go! We'll have to get the fans set up for summer!
    Regards, Greg Dorfmeier, Smyrna, Ga RANS V2 005



    "Al Kubeluis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi Greg, Yes, Edwards-Reed HRM book is very useful, as is HRM. Yes also regarding performance
    > improvements. My pedaling style has improved noticeably due to trainer and to headrest. I have
    > smoothened pedal stroke and body rocking motion especially under stress. The reasons that trainer
    > and headrest have helped is feedback. When pedaling motion is uneven, trainer rocks and head moves
    > against headrest.
    > --
    > ~~~al.kubeluis..md.usa.earth.sun.milkyway.virgo.universe..corsa~~~
    >
    > "Greg Dorfmeier" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I recommend you get a book that has structured workouts in it, such as "The Heart Rate Monitor
    > > Book for Cyclists" by Sally Edwards, or "Smart Cycling" by Arnie Baker. These make the time go
    > > by fast. You can also track performance improvements easier than on the road. Regards, Greg
    > > Dorfmeier, RANS V2
    > >
    > > [email protected] (Pat) wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > [email protected] (Akensmith) wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > > > But any ideas or literature or similar experiences as to why indoor
    > may be
    > > > > harder would be appreciated?>>
    > > > >
    > > > > Al,
    > > > >
    > > > > At the risk of pointing out the obvious, there are no hills, either up
    > or down
    > > > > in your garage. When I ride the rollers in the hallway with a fan and
    > heart
    > > > > rate monitor, I can work without the brief rest periods I would get
    > when riding
    > > > > down a hill, coasting to a stop light, etc. So it's entirely possible
    > you're
    > > > > getting a more vigorous workout indoors than you would riding for the
    > same time
    > > > > outdoors.
    > > > >
    > > > > Norm
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > I agree with both Norm and AL, about the potential quality and benefits of stationary
    > > > training. I have been riding rollers through the winter and find it a very beneficial workout.
    > > > As Norm points out, spending an hour on whatever sort of stationary device you choose, can be
    > > > a pretty intensive workout, with few of the natural breaks/rests that you get in an on the
    > > > road riding. While commuting has a great many benefits aside from the physical conditioning
    > > > that it provides, I find that I get a much better workout for an hour on the rollers than I do
    > > > in commuting, although I also commute on a limited basis. The challenge with stationary riding
    > > > is the boredom issue and the fact that although you do get a good workout, you cannot rely
    > > > (nor would you wnat to) on station training as a replacement for spending time on the road. I
    > > > try to get out on the road at least once a week during the winter.
    > > >
    > > > Pat Mc
     
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