Training Advice for a serious novice

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by LBCBJ, Jul 29, 2007.

  1. LBCBJ

    LBCBJ New Member

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    I have absolutley no cycling experience whatsover (ran cross-country in high school for 1 year), but I plan on joining my university's cycling club in the fall. I've made the biggest leap of commitment so far by purchasing a $2500 carbon road this weekend (Cannondale Synpase Carbon), so now I just need some advice on how to get started.

    What type of training program/advice would you give to someone who has ridden no more than 5 miles on a bike, but is very serious about the sport and plan on competeing in collegiate cycling within 12 months? For example what would you reccomend for the first week of riding, how many days, how far, how fast, what gearing, etc.

    I took my bike out for my first ride yesterday and cycled about 3 miles, and I felt really shakey, even had difficulty riding in a straight line, and just felt all around uncomfortable, which I hope is normal for the first ride. I honeslty havent even figured out gear shifting yet.

    I live in a relativley remote rural area and have no cycling clubs or gyms, and will not be returning to school for another 30 days, so I really feel clueless as to how to get started. Any advice is much appreciated!

    Regards,
    Brent
     
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  2. wiredued

    wiredued New Member

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    Find some loops or up and back rides with little traffic and few stops 1 to 3 hours long (never more than 4 hours) push yourself but keep breathing under control this would make up most of your riding time. When you are ready find a five minute hill and do some hill repeats 5x5s soon after the first minute of a five minute interval breathing should be out of control these would be good for peaking six weeks before an event or improving when you plateau. I don't like 5x5s but being on a plateau for a couple months can be a real motivator and I am working them in once a week...Enjoy your new bike:)



     
  3. Strumpetto

    Strumpetto New Member

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    Man, good luck. You're position is a good one in that you were able to purchase a good bike right from the start. Just get out there and ride, push youself, but don't push yourself too hard as too much is worse than too little. Don't forget to eat protein and carbs right after you ride. It's quite important. Also make sure you have a rest day or two. Listen to your body. You don't have to kill yourself to improve. Within the last week I pushed myself way too hard and I am currently feeling extremely fatigued. I can't even get on the bike. Don't make the same mistake. Good luck with your riding! I wish my school had a team!
     
  4. GrooveSlave

    GrooveSlave New Member

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    I would also add that you should consider purchasing a good book or two about cycling training. A standard recommendation - though pretty advanced - is "The Cyclists Training Bible" by Joe Friel.

    A more general overview can be had in "Serious Cycling" by Burke.

    Good luck. Let us know how it goes.
     
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