Training advice for SPINNING / 20 minutes/day

Discussion in 'Power Training' started by mikael17128, Dec 19, 2005.

  1. mikael17128

    mikael17128 New Member

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    I’m a 38 year old male with a max HR of 181. I’d like to try my hand at racing (Masters 35+) this year and have started using a spinning machine for a new 20-minute training regimen:



    0 to 5:00 @ 250W

    5:00 to 7:30 @ 275W

    7:31 to 10:00 @ 300W

    10:01 to 12:30 @ 325W

    12:31 to 15:00 @ 350W (HR 171 clocked w/ HR monitor – 12/19/05)

    15:01 to 20:00 @ 250W



    I plan to increase all of these values by 5 watts every 10 days, ending up pushing 440W from 12:31 to 15:00 minutes by the end of June. I’d like to hear any advice you’d care to share. I don’t want to spend more than 20 minutes/day on the spinning machine though. I will be riding outdoors for 60 or so miles x2/week also.



    Any comments welcome!



    MRW
     
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  2. Spunout

    Spunout New Member

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    Talk to a coach, or read a book on periodization. Glad you asked the questions here first!

    A lot of people would have some things to say about your plan, I'm not going to go there. Read, study, talk to someone who races and trains for events similar to your goal events.
     
  3. mikael17128

    mikael17128 New Member

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    Thanks for the nudge. I just checked Amazon.com and came up with this:

    Periodization: Theory and Methodology of Training
    by Tudor Bompa

    There were a bunch of hits for periodization but this seems to be the only book dedicated to the subject.

    Thanks again.
     
  4. BlueJersey

    BlueJersey New Member

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    What machine is this? Are you sure the power reading is accurate? Sustaining 440w for 15 minutes is "division 1 pro" hard. Since you haven't mentioned your base power output it is impossible to speculate how far jump your power output is.

     
  5. RapDaddyo

    RapDaddyo Active Member

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    Actually, I think your question is a reasonable one. My reaction to your plan is as follows. First, I don't know why you're riding a ramp up intensity vs. a constant intensity. Second, there is no evidence (in your posting) that your power levels have any logic to them. Third, your plan to increase power by 5w every 10 days doesn't make sense to me because it's not based on evidence of an increase in sustainable power.

    This is how I would approach it. First, I assume you have no health issues. If you have any concerns, get a physical and be sure to tell your Doc what you will be doing. Second, I would read Andy Coggan's paper on training and racing with power http://www.peakscoachinggroup.com/PowerTrainingChapter.pdf. The purpose of all intervals is to stimulate a desired adaptation. This will give you power levels for each desired adaptation. I suggest that you focus on L4-L6 adaptations and the associated power levels as a function of FT. Third, you need to benchmark your current power. That's easy. Get on your trainer and ride at the power level you can maintain for a full hour. You should have a feel for that based on what you have done to date. If you have to back off a bit in the last 15 mins or if you feel you have a bit left at the end, don't worry about it because you can re-test yourself as often as you want -- after all, a test is just a 1 hr training ride. That test is crucial -- it defines your target power levels for all adaptations. It really doesn't matter whether your trainer is accurate absolutely. It only matters that the readings are linear -- i.e., 300w is 1.5 x 200w. As to allocation of your training time, I see no reason to ramp up given that you only have 20 mins a day. Nor do I see a reason for a recovery or rest day with so little time per day on the bike. I think after a couple of minutes to warm up, you can go straight to L4. I think if it were me, I would do 15 mins at L4 and 5 mins at L5. Re-test yourself regularly and raise your interval power targets as you increase your FT, not based on some arbitrary schedule. Some weeks you might increase it more than 5w and some weeks you might not not increase it at all. Don't expect miracles with 20 mins a day on the bike, but you should increase your power over time. The main points are that you will have an understanding of the adaptations you are trying to induce, a way to test and re-test your sustainable power and interval target ranges scientifically (vs. anecdotally) derived.
     
  6. kmavm

    kmavm New Member

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    Be careful! That's a book for strength/power athletes.

    In the realm of cycling, there are a number of books that address periodized training schedules. The two most popular ones, by a country mile, are Carmichael's Ultimate Ride and Friel's Cyclist's Training Bible. Now, lots of people have made a ton of progress with the systems outlined in these books. I, personally, feel that these two books wasted about two years of my training time. Under both systems, it seemed like I was perpetually "preparing" to actually ride my bike: weights, then long steady distance, then maybe a little bit of heavy breathing, BUT DON'T OVERTRAIN, OH GOD NO, TAKE OFF DAYS AND DAYS BETWEEN INTENSE DAYS!!! etc. Then when it came time to ride hard, I was unprepared for the intensity of the effort, and hence, awful.

    I think a more evidence-based approach can be found in Asker Jeukendrup's "High Performance Cycling," and David Morris' similarly named "Performance Cycling." The problem is that both of these books are structured more as grab-bags of facts than as a ready-made, unified system that you can apply directly to your season. I hunger for some scientifically-oriented coaches (Andy! Ric!) to put together a system oriented towards the self-coached athlete, but for now, I'm stuck winging it.

    Whatever books you end up reading, remember this: exercise physiology is still an incredibly young field, and nobody has all the answers. Even seemingly simple questions, like "Why do athletes get tired?", have not yet been definitively answered. So, be skeptical of coaches or experts that claim to have it all figured out.
     
  7. Spunout

    Spunout New Member

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    For programming, take a look at Jon Ackland's book "Endurance Training". It uses all of the basic theory, but presents the ideas behind planning so that you can take it yourself and build on it using more modern performance based theories (Jeukendrup, etc.).

    I'm using Ackland's theory in Friel's model using Lemond's microcycles! Oh yeah, read Lemond's book (forget name) and a very simple plan that will either a) win you three Tours of France or b) kill you ;-)

    I really like the way Ackland tapers up and tapers down, different than Friel. Also, beware that cyclists can take much more intensity than the marathoner as prescribed in this book.
     
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