training and weight loss (and a few other questions)

Discussion in 'Triathlon' started by Ndjamie2003, Aug 9, 2003.

  1. Ndjamie2003

    Ndjamie2003 Guest

    I have been reading this group for awhile and I am very excited to begin participating in
    triathlons. I was planning to compete in my first sprint triathlon this past july but I ended up
    not having enough time to train. So I've decided that I am going to do one next summer for sure
    (most of the ones in my area seem to be over for now), and this fall and winter I'm going to do
    enough so that, come summer, I just have to step up my training a little bit and not start
    completely from scratch.

    I checked out trinewbies.com and found all of the great information there but I have a few other
    questions.

    1. The biggest question I have is about weight loss. I am a 22 year old female, 5'1 and 150 lbs (I
    don't actually look as fat as that might sound - I know I am overweight but much of it is
    muscle, especially my legs. I am definately a short and stocky built person). I am hoping to
    lose about 20 pounds and would love to lose 30-40 (if that's realistic). How much do you think I
    need to adjust my diet in order to achieve this on top of training? I am talking mostly about
    calories (I know that I need to eat healthy foods instead of fatty foods and stuff like that). I
    normally eat 1500-1800 calories a day and my weight doesn't really fluctuate with that. I have
    experimented with eating less than that and have found that if I don't work out I feel fine but
    if I do exercise I end up extremely hungry. Right now I am planning to alternate swimming one
    day (between 4000-5000m) with biking the next day (about 7-10 miles for now depending on time),
    taking 1 day off, and throwing a little bit of running in there each day (not alot until I am
    built up, see the next question). Will that probably be enough for weight loss or should i cut
    calories too? Also, how do I make sure I am not eating back the calories that i just burned off
    because I'm hungry after working out? Sorry if these are stupid questions but they are things I
    am having trouble with.

    2. Also, I come from a competitive swimming background and still swim quite often. Put me in a pool
    or lake and I can easily swim 5000m. But...make me run and I can barely run a mile. In fact I
    can probably run 3/4 a mile at the most. Any advice on how to get into running shape? At this
    point I am just doing a little each day as a warm-up before my swimming or biking trying to
    build up some distance. Any other hints?

    3. Also, a question for others of you from a swimming background: How do you balance your training?
    Obviously you need to be good at all 3 sports, but there are time constraints for training and
    everything. My first instinct is to focus hard on swimming because it is my best part and the
    one part that I could have an advantage on. But from everything I've read on here it sounds like
    I'm really not going to have much of an advantage because the distances aren't really
    comparable. I might be best to focus on running, although I've never been a good runner so I
    don't really think it will do much good. I'm not planning on going out and winning or anything
    but I do want to do somewhat okay
    :).

    Thanks for any advice anyone can give me! If you e-mail me, please send it to [email protected]
    (all I ever get at this aol address is junk so I hardly ever read it).
     
    Tags:


  2. Mike Charles

    Mike Charles Guest

    Jamie,

    I participated in my first two triathlons this year and had a great time. I am planning to do my
    third this fall (it doesn't get too cold in Houston until November) so my season will be three. I
    was never a competitive swimmer, biker or runner but by far swimming was my weakest sport. For my
    first race, I had to train 5 days a week just to be able to make the 400m distance. The race turned
    out good but I finished last in the bike (did it on a mountain bike with Knobby tires) and had a
    reasonably good run.

    I wanted to share this story with you for a few reasons. First, if you can make the swim and it
    sounds like you probably could do very well given your background, I would recommend that you spend
    the least amount of time on that phase. It only lasts 5-10 minutes in a sprint race and you are
    already good in this event.

    For the second race, I got a road bike and spent 70% of my time training for that event. The results
    were good: I improved my overall time by 10 minutes. Because the bike is the longest event,
    improvement in your speed has the greatest impact on your time. The one mistake I made was probably
    spending too much training time here. Once I got to the run, I was totally spent and ran a bad 5k.
    In my first race I ran it in 27 min and in the second just over 30m.

    My plan for my third race is more balanced. I have my bases built now in all three sports, so I am
    focussing on my overall fitness, transitions and training the events together Swim-Bike, Bike-Run
    (Bricks), and all three together.

    For you I would recommend to spend a higher percentage on running, followed by biking then swimming.

    As far as nutrition goes, I had the same goal to lose weight but I quickly found out that I was
    hugry all the time. After trying for a while, I decided it was best for me to back off the goal of
    losing alot quick and just let nature take its course.

    So far I have lost 12# so I am not complaining.

    If you are thinking about a book, I tried a few and the one I like is "Training Plans for Multisport
    Athletes" by Gail Berhhardt.

    Hope this helps. Good luck.

    Below are my thoughts on your [email protected] (NDJamie2003) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I have been reading this group for awhile and I am very excited to begin participating in
    > triathlons. I was planning to compete in my first sprint triathlon this past july but I ended up
    > not having enough time to train. So I've decided that I am going to do one next summer for sure
    > (most of the ones in my area seem to be over for now), and this fall and winter I'm going to do
    > enough so that, come summer, I just have to step up my training a little bit and not start
    > completely from scratch.
    >
    > I checked out trinewbies.com and found all of the great information there but I have a few other
    > questions.
    >
    > 1. The biggest question I have is about weight loss. I am a 22 year old female, 5'1 and 150 lbs
    > (I don't actually look as fat as that might sound - I know I am overweight but much of it is
    > muscle, especially my legs. I am definately a short and stocky built person). I am hoping to
    > lose about 20 pounds and would love to lose 30-40 (if that's realistic). How much do you think
    > I need to adjust my diet in order to achieve this on top of training? I am talking mostly
    > about calories (I know that I need to eat healthy foods instead of fatty foods and stuff like
    > that). I normally eat 1500-1800 calories a day and my weight doesn't really fluctuate with
    > that. I have experimented with eating less than that and have found that if I don't work out I
    > feel fine but if I do exercise I end up extremely hungry. Right now I am planning to alternate
    > swimming one day (between 4000-5000m) with biking the next day (about 7-10 miles for now
    > depending on time), taking 1 day off, and throwing a little bit of running in there each day
    > (not alot until I am built up, see the next question). Will that probably be enough for weight
    > loss or should i cut calories too? Also, how do I make sure I am not eating back the calories
    > that i just burned off because I'm hungry after working out? Sorry if these are stupid
    > questions but they are things I am having trouble with.
    >
    > 2. Also, I come from a competitive swimming background and still swim quite often. Put me in a
    > pool or lake and I can easily swim 5000m. But...make me run and I can barely run a mile. In
    > fact I can probably run 3/4 a mile at the most. Any advice on how to get into running shape?
    > At this point I am just doing a little each day as a warm-up before my swimming or biking
    > trying to build up some distance. Any other hints?
    >
    > 3. Also, a question for others of you from a swimming background: How do you balance your
    > training? Obviously you need to be good at all 3 sports, but there are time constraints for
    > training and everything. My first instinct is to focus hard on swimming because it is my best
    > part and the one part that I could have an advantage on. But from everything I've read on here
    > it sounds like I'm really not going to have much of an advantage because the distances aren't
    > really comparable. I might be best to focus on running, although I've never been a good runner
    > so I don't really think it will do much good. I'm not planning on going out and winning or
    > anything but I do want to do somewhat okay
    > :).
    >
    >
    > Thanks for any advice anyone can give me! If you e-mail me, please send it to [email protected]
    > (all I ever get at this aol address is junk so I hardly ever read it).
     
  3. Tom G

    Tom G Guest

    I would make, humbly, a few suggestions.

    First of all, regarding your timetable. You have lots of time, so you can really manage things well.
    That's a great advantage. I suggest that you invest in Friel's "Triathlete's Training Bible"
    (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/188473748X/qid=1060536937/sr=
    8-1/ref=sr_8_1/104-1063396-3146312?v=glance&s=books&n=507846), and specifically read up about
    periodization training.

    Second of all, I suggest that you use the long lag-time you have wisely by doing 2 things: a)
    lifting weights and building lean muscle-mass (if you need some good advice about this, let me
    know). Building lean muscle will increase your metabolism substantially, thereby aiding in your
    weight reduction. b) This is the time to transition into running. Since you mention that running a
    mile is a bit of a chore, I would suggest that you work hard at running slowly with a low heart
    rate - around 130. This will get your frame accustomed to the jolts of running, will increase leg
    strength necessary for running, and will burn fat as opposed to carbohydrates (aiding in your
    weight loss).

    I was a competitive swimmer (breast stroke in hs and college - 30 years ago!), and found that when I
    started with tri it was only a minor aide. The swimming leg is VERY stressful and the distance is
    short. Stressful because you will be like a bunch of carp in a bathtub - all trying to find the
    correct and shortest line with no lanes. Lots of kicking and jostling. I'm too old for that sort of
    thing, so I just swim on the side and enjoy - I alternate between craw and breast, since my breast
    is still a lot faster than a lot of guys my age swimming crawl. Short, since how much time can you
    take in 1500 m? Not a lot.

    You now have the opportunity to plan ahead. That's good. Do a lot of reading.

    Also, remember that training is 3-pronged. Many newcomers think that running/swimming/biking are the
    3 prongs. WRONG. The three prongs are exercise/nutrition/rest. Once you read up on these three
    prongs, you'll be on your way.

    Have fun.

    One more thing: I find it helpful to think about who I am competing against. I am competing against
    myself only. I find this a great aide and motivator since I am not always trying to best the other
    guy. Mind you, it takes a lot of discipline.

    Tom

    "NDJamie2003" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I have been reading this group for awhile and I am very excited to begin participating in
    > triathlons. I was planning to compete in my first sprint triathlon this past july but I ended up
    > not having enough time to train.
    So
    > I've decided that I am going to do one next summer for sure (most of the
    ones
    > in my area seem to be over for now), and this fall and winter I'm going to
    do
    > enough so that, come summer, I just have to step up my training a little
    bit
    > and not start completely from scratch.
    >
    > I checked out trinewbies.com and found all of the great information there
    but I
    > have a few other questions.
    >
    > 1. The biggest question I have is about weight loss. I am a 22 year old female, 5'1 and 150 lbs
    > (I don't actually look as fat as that might
    sound - I
    > know I am overweight but much of it is muscle, especially my legs. I am definately a short and
    > stocky built person). I am hoping to lose about 20 pounds and would love to lose 30-40 (if that's
    > realistic). How much do
    you
    > think I need to adjust my diet in order to achieve this on top of
    training? I
    > am talking mostly about calories (I know that I need to eat healthy foods instead of fatty foods
    > and stuff like that). I normally eat 1500-1800
    calories
    > a day and my weight doesn't really fluctuate with that. I have
    experimented
    > with eating less than that and have found that if I don't work out I feel
    fine
    > but if I do exercise I end up extremely hungry. Right now I am planning
    to
    > alternate swimming one day (between 4000-5000m) with biking the next day
    (about
    > 7-10 miles for now depending on time), taking 1 day off, and throwing a
    little
    > bit of running in there each day (not alot until I am built up, see the
    next
    > question). Will that probably be enough for weight loss or should i cut calories too? Also, how do
    > I make sure I am not eating back the calories
    that
    > i just burned off because I'm hungry after working out? Sorry if these
    are
    > stupid questions but they are things I am having trouble with.
    >
    > 2. Also, I come from a competitive swimming background and still swim
    quite
    > often. Put me in a pool or lake and I can easily swim 5000m. But...make
    me
    > run and I can barely run a mile. In fact I can probably run 3/4 a mile at
    the
    > most. Any advice on how to get into running shape? At this point I am
    just
    > doing a little each day as a warm-up before my swimming or biking trying
    to
    > build up some distance. Any other hints?
    >
    > 3. Also, a question for others of you from a swimming background: How do
    you
    > balance your training? Obviously you need to be good at all 3 sports, but there are time
    > constraints for training and everything. My first instinct
    is
    > to focus hard on swimming because it is my best part and the one part that
    I
    > could have an advantage on. But from everything I've read on here it
    sounds
    > like I'm really not going to have much of an advantage because the
    distances
    > aren't really comparable. I might be best to focus on running, although
    I've
    > never been a good runner so I don't really think it will do much good.
    I'm not
    > planning on going out and winning or anything but I do want to do somewhat
    okay
    > :).
    >
    >
    > Thanks for any advice anyone can give me! If you e-mail me, please send
    it to
    > [email protected] (all I ever get at this aol address is junk so I
    hardly
    > ever read it).
     
  4. MJuric

    MJuric Guest

    On 09 Aug 2003 14:27:38 GMT, [email protected] (NDJamie2003) wrote:

    >I have been reading this group for awhile and I am very excited to begin participating in
    >triathlons. I was planning to compete in my first sprint triathlon this past july but I ended up
    >not having enough time to train. So I've decided that I am going to do one next summer for sure
    >(most of the ones in my area seem to be over for now), and this fall and winter I'm going to do
    >enough so that, come summer, I just have to step up my training a little bit and not start
    >completely from scratch.
    >
    >I checked out trinewbies.com and found all of the great information there but I have a few other
    >questions.
    >
    >1. The biggest question I have is about weight loss. I am a 22 year old female, 5'1 and 150 lbs (I
    > don't actually look as fat as that might sound - I know I am overweight but much of it is
    > muscle, especially my legs. I am definately a short and stocky built person). I am hoping to
    > lose about 20 pounds and would love to lose 30-40 (if that's realistic). How much do you think
    > I need to adjust my diet in order to achieve this on top of training? I am talking mostly about
    > calories (I know that I need to eat healthy foods instead of fatty foods and stuff like that).
    > I normally eat 1500-1800 calories a day and my weight doesn't really fluctuate with that. I
    > have experimented with eating less than that and have found that if I don't work out I feel
    > fine but if I do exercise I end up extremely hungry. Right now I am planning to alternate
    > swimming one day (between 4000-5000m) with biking the next day (about 7-10 miles for now
    > depending on time), taking 1 day off, and throwing a little bit of running in there each day
    > (not alot until I am built up, see the next question). Will that probably be enough for weight
    > loss or should i cut calories too? Also, how do I make sure I am not eating back the calories
    > that i just burned off because I'm hungry after working out? Sorry if these are stupid
    > questions but they are things I am having trouble with.

    The simple solution is to keep track of how many calories you eat and how many you burn. You
    simple find out how many calories it takes for a person of the weight you desire to be to
    sustain that weight. Simply add up how many calories you eat and subtract how many you burn.
    The total for the day should be near or slightly less than the desired weight. Their are
    obviously millions of iterations of this concept out there called "diets", however they boil
    down to one thing eat less calories. There are many places on the web that give "estimates"
    for calories burnt during excercise. If you come up with a daily caloric deficit from that
    desired weight, most people will eventually weigh that weight. If you don't work out and
    don't lose weight at 1500-1800 calories a day more than likely that is the caloric intake
    that is needed to sustain that weight for you. You get hungry while working out becuase your
    body is burning more calories than you are taking in. If you are doing one of those
    4000-5000M workouts you are speaking of probably alot more.

    >
    >2. Also, I come from a competitive swimming background and still swim quite often. Put me in a
    > pool or lake and I can easily swim 5000m. But...make me run and I can barely run a mile. In
    > fact I can probably run 3/4 a mile at the most. Any advice on how to get into running shape? At
    > this point I am just doing a little each day as a warm-up before my swimming or biking trying
    > to build up some distance. Any other hints?

    Well if you can remeber back to when you started swimming you probably didn't start out
    swimming 5000m. Same thing with running and biking.There are lots and lots of books on
    running and biking and tri's I suggest getting a few that are bent towards beginneers and
    look at what they offer for workouts and schedules. What ever you do start out slow and
    don't over do it. Running run slow and as far as you feel comfortable, don't push for now.
    Even try running a bit walk a bit. Bike- get out and ride. Do both a "conversational" (You
    shoudl be able to easily carry on a conversation) pace adn slowly increase the time
    distance. Don't increase more than 10% a week to help in avoiding injury.

    >
    >3. Also, a question for others of you from a swimming background: How do you balance your
    > training? Obviously you need to be good at all 3 sports, but there are time constraints for
    > training and everything. My first instinct is to focus hard on swimming because it is my best
    > part and the one part that I could have an advantage on. But from everything I've read on here
    > it sounds like I'm really not going to have much of an advantage because the distances aren't
    > really comparable. I might be best to focus on running, although I've never been a good runner
    > so I don't really think it will do much good. I'm not planning on going out and winning or
    > anything but I do want to do somewhat okay
    >:).

    Rarely train your strong point your weak points. You could probably spend alot of time
    working on your swim right now and only gain small percentage gains. In your case this is
    especially true because your strong suit is the least impactfull leg of the try. However
    spending equal time on your biking or running will yield much greater percentage
    improvements. Lets say you have 3 hours a week to train. If you spend 2 hrs on swimming and
    one hour on running and biking what woudl be the results. More than likely your swimming
    woudl not improve much and your running biking/ would improve minimally. Not lets flip that
    and say you spend 1/2 an hour swimming and 2 1/2 hours on running/biking. more than likely
    your swimming woudl suffer a bit but your running adn biking woudl improve significantly.

    ~Matt

    >
    >
    >Thanks for any advice anyone can give me! If you e-mail me, please send it to [email protected]
    >(all I ever get at this aol address is junk so I hardly ever read it).
     
  5. Triandrun

    Triandrun Guest

    "Tom G" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I would make, humbly, a few suggestions.
    >
    > First of all, regarding your timetable. You have lots of time, so you can really manage things
    > well. That's a great advantage. I suggest that you invest in Friel's "Triathlete's Training Bible"
    > (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/188473748X/qid=1060536937/sr=
    > 8-1/ref=sr_8_1/104-1063396-3146312?v=glance&s=books&n=507846), and specifically read up about
    > periodization training.
    >
    > Second of all, I suggest that you use the long lag-time you have wisely by doing 2 things: a)
    > lifting weights and building lean muscle-mass (if you need some good advice about this, let me
    > know). Building lean muscle will increase your metabolism substantially, thereby aiding in your
    > weight reduction. b) This is the time to transition into running. Since you mention that running a
    > mile is a bit of a chore, I would suggest that you work hard at running slowly with a low heart
    > rate - around 130. This will get your frame accustomed to the jolts of running, will increase leg
    > strength necessary for running, and will burn fat as opposed to carbohydrates (aiding in your
    > weight loss).
    >
    > I was a competitive swimmer (breast stroke in hs and college - 30 years ago!), and found that when
    > I started with tri it was only a minor aide. The swimming leg is VERY stressful and the distance
    > is short. Stressful because you will be like a bunch of carp in a bathtub - all trying to find the
    > correct and shortest line with no lanes. Lots of kicking and jostling. I'm too old for that sort
    > of thing, so I just swim on the side and enjoy - I alternate between craw and breast, since my
    > breast is still a lot faster than a lot of guys my age swimming crawl. Short, since how much time
    > can you take in 1500 m? Not a lot.
    >
    > You now have the opportunity to plan ahead. That's good. Do a lot of reading.
    >
    > Also, remember that training is 3-pronged. Many newcomers think that running/swimming/biking are
    > the 3 prongs. WRONG. The three prongs are exercise/nutrition/rest. Once you read up on these three
    > prongs, you'll be on your way.
    >
    > Have fun.
    >
    > One more thing: I find it helpful to think about who I am competing against. I am competing
    > against myself only. I find this a great aide and motivator since I am not always trying to best
    > the other guy. Mind you, it takes a lot of discipline.
    >
    > Tom
    >
    >
    > "NDJamie2003" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I have been reading this group for awhile and I am very excited to begin participating in
    > > triathlons. I was planning to compete in my first sprint triathlon this past july but I ended up
    > > not having enough time to train.
    > So
    > > I've decided that I am going to do one next summer for sure (most of the
    > ones
    > > in my area seem to be over for now), and this fall and winter I'm going to
    > do
    > > enough so that, come summer, I just have to step up my training a little
    > bit
    > > and not start completely from scratch.
    > >
    > > I checked out trinewbies.com and found all of the great information there
    > but I
    > > have a few other questions.
    > >
    > > 1. The biggest question I have is about weight loss. I am a 22 year old female, 5'1 and 150 lbs
    > > (I don't actually look as fat as that might
    > sound - I
    > > know I am overweight but much of it is muscle, especially my legs. I am definately a short and
    > > stocky built person). I am hoping to lose about 20 pounds and would love to lose 30-40 (if
    > > that's realistic). How much do
    > you
    > > think I need to adjust my diet in order to achieve this on top of
    > training? I
    > > am talking mostly about calories (I know that I need to eat healthy foods instead of fatty foods
    > > and stuff like that). I normally eat 1500-1800
    > calories
    > > a day and my weight doesn't really fluctuate with that. I have
    > experimented
    > > with eating less than that and have found that if I don't work out I feel
    > fine
    > > but if I do exercise I end up extremely hungry. Right now I am planning
    > to
    > > alternate swimming one day (between 4000-5000m) with biking the next day
    > (about
    > > 7-10 miles for now depending on time), taking 1 day off, and throwing a
    > little
    > > bit of running in there each day (not alot until I am built up, see the
    > next
    > > question). Will that probably be enough for weight loss or should i cut calories too? Also, how
    > > do I make sure I am not eating back the calories
    > that
    > > i just burned off because I'm hungry after working out? Sorry if these
    > are
    > > stupid questions but they are things I am having trouble with.
    > >
    > > 2. Also, I come from a competitive swimming background and still swim
    > quite
    > > often. Put me in a pool or lake and I can easily swim 5000m. But...make
    > me
    > > run and I can barely run a mile. In fact I can probably run 3/4 a mile at
    > the
    > > most. Any advice on how to get into running shape? At this point I am
    > just
    > > doing a little each day as a warm-up before my swimming or biking trying
    > to
    > > build up some distance. Any other hints?
    > >
    > > 3. Also, a question for others of you from a swimming background: How do
    > you
    > > balance your training? Obviously you need to be good at all 3 sports, but there are time
    > > constraints for training and everything. My first instinct
    > is
    > > to focus hard on swimming because it is my best part and the one part that
    > I
    > > could have an advantage on. But from everything I've read on here it
    > sounds
    > > like I'm really not going to have much of an advantage because the
    > distances
    > > aren't really comparable. I might be best to focus on running, although
    > I've
    > > never been a good runner so I don't really think it will do much good.
    > I'm not
    > > planning on going out and winning or anything but I do want to do somewhat
    > okay
    > > :).
    > >
    > >
    > > Thanks for any advice anyone can give me! If you e-mail me, please send
    > it to
    > > [email protected] (all I ever get at this aol address is junk so I
    > hardly
    > > ever read it).

    VERY wise word Tom - much respect.
     
  6. Curt

    Curt Guest

    I can't help you on the tri part, because I haven't done one yet, but am just reading this group
    and whatever else I can get my hands on. I have had great success with dieting on Atkins. There is
    a group for that as well at alt.support.diet.low-carb . There are a few swimmers and runners on
    there as well.

    I hope to do my first tri next year. I could do a sprint now, but I would like to do a little better
    than just finish.

    Good luck, Curt

    "NDJamie2003" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I have been reading this group for awhile and I am very excited to begin participating in
    > triathlons. I was planning to compete in my first sprint triathlon this past july but I ended up
    > not having enough time to train.
    So
    > I've decided that I am going to do one next summer for sure (most of the
    ones
    > in my area seem to be over for now), and this fall and winter I'm going to
    do
    > enough so that, come summer, I just have to step up my training a little
    bit
    > and not start completely from scratch.
    >
    > I checked out trinewbies.com and found all of the great information there
    but I
    > have a few other questions.
    >
    > 1. The biggest question I have is about weight loss. I am a 22 year old female, 5'1 and 150 lbs
    > (I don't actually look as fat as that might
    sound - I
    > know I am overweight but much of it is muscle, especially my legs. I am definately a short and
    > stocky built person). I am hoping to lose about 20 pounds and would love to lose 30-40 (if that's
    > realistic). How much do
    you
    > think I need to adjust my diet in order to achieve this on top of
    training? I
    > am talking mostly about calories (I know that I need to eat healthy foods instead of fatty foods
    > and stuff like that). I normally eat 1500-1800
    calories
    > a day and my weight doesn't really fluctuate with that. I have
    experimented
    > with eating less than that and have found that if I don't work out I feel
    fine
    > but if I do exercise I end up extremely hungry. Right now I am planning
    to
    > alternate swimming one day (between 4000-5000m) with biking the next day
    (about
    > 7-10 miles for now depending on time), taking 1 day off, and throwing a
    little
    > bit of running in there each day (not alot until I am built up, see the
    next
    > question). Will that probably be enough for weight loss or should i cut calories too? Also, how do
    > I make sure I am not eating back the calories
    that
    > i just burned off because I'm hungry after working out? Sorry if these
    are
    > stupid questions but they are things I am having trouble with.
    >
    > 2. Also, I come from a competitive swimming background and still swim
    quite
    > often. Put me in a pool or lake and I can easily swim 5000m. But...make
    me
    > run and I can barely run a mile. In fact I can probably run 3/4 a mile at
    the
    > most. Any advice on how to get into running shape? At this point I am
    just
    > doing a little each day as a warm-up before my swimming or biking trying
    to
    > build up some distance. Any other hints?
    >
    > 3. Also, a question for others of you from a swimming background: How do
    you
    > balance your training? Obviously you need to be good at all 3 sports, but there are time
    > constraints for training and everything. My first instinct
    is
    > to focus hard on swimming because it is my best part and the one part that
    I
    > could have an advantage on. But from everything I've read on here it
    sounds
    > like I'm really not going to have much of an advantage because the
    distances
    > aren't really comparable. I might be best to focus on running, although
    I've
    > never been a good runner so I don't really think it will do much good.
    I'm not
    > planning on going out and winning or anything but I do want to do somewhat
    okay
    > :).
    >
    >
    > Thanks for any advice anyone can give me! If you e-mail me, please send
    it to
    > [email protected] (all I ever get at this aol address is junk so I
    hardly
    > ever read it).
     
  7. Jp

    Jp Guest

    Since beginning to train for my first tri season in January, I've lost 18lbs. Your build sounds
    similar to mine -- so I believe you when you say you're not fat. I train 6 days a week (swim four,
    run six and long bike rides when I have a chance). Other than cutting out sugar, caffine and white
    pasta and break, I didn't change my diet. I'm a vegetarian, and added extra beans to my diet to
    fill me up - salad and pasta doesn't do it for me. Eat sensible snacks when you're hungry, it's
    worked for me.

    I'm also a swimmer and a runner, and even though you're not "supposed" to, I do use those two as my
    crutch. I swim and run hard because I like to and I'm good at it. But, do practice on the bike (I'm
    very guilty of having a 1 month bike taper!). I've dropped 6 minutes off my overall time this year
    (mostly on the run and swim).

    Good luck!
     
  8. Mike Lana

    Mike Lana Guest

    Hi Jamie, I started doing triathlons 5 years ago. I had many of the problems you do. I could not run
    over a half-mile. I could ride a bike but not real fast and I was a competitive swimmer in high
    school. I was about 20 LB heavier than an ideal racing weight.

    I lost 20 LB in 3 months of training. All I did was make minor changes and train. I stopped drinking
    soda (and limited other simple sugars). If I normally ate 4 pieces of pizza, I ate 3. I would not
    eat anything within a 3-hour window of going to bed. I would check your serving size to make sure
    your calorie consumption is correct. 1500 calories and light walking 15 min a day would make most
    loose weight. I am a lot bigger but when I am training hard I eat about 3000 and still loose weight.

    One important thing is don't fall for the all carbohydrates are bad theory. If you do, you will be
    abusing your body. Atkins wrote his book for severely overweight people who do not work out. The
    process of getting proteins to synthesize into a carbohydrate like state is very taxing and time
    consuming. If you are working out heavily, you do not have the time or energy to do this and you
    bonk (run out of carbohydrates) frequently. Instead limit you simple sugars, like many breakfast
    cereals, soda, fruit juices, candy and highly processed breads. Keep eating your pasta, rice,
    pieces of fruit, and breads that have not been highly processed. You will need this energy to
    train, but your body wont freak out and store it as fat (like it does when you eat too many simple
    sugars in a sitting).

    I started out not being able to run at all. Three months later I was running 12 miles a week. Why is
    this important? For one it's a major part of the triathlon. Another thing is running burns more
    calories than biking or swimming the same amount of time. We don't fully know why but it does. Just
    jog slow enough so that you could talk to someone without gasping for air. You may start out just
    shuffling but it will get better. Understand that the average person could jog 4 miles, if they
    paced themselves corectly, without injury. The rest reason many stop and say they can't run anymore
    is mental. I kept telling myself that and kept building up my weekly run total by 7%-10% a week.

    As far as dividing up my training. In the off season I don't start swimming until March. I know the
    swim is a strong leg for me and it is a very short leg. I never train the swim over 2500 M since I
    will never race over that distance. Over the winter I train 60% bike on a trainer and 40% run.
    Starting in March I go 45% bike 35% run 20% swim. That's what has worked for me.

    Good luck on finishing your first triathlon Mike

    [email protected] (NDJamie2003) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I have been reading this group for awhile and I am very excited to begin participating in
    > triathlons. I was planning to compete in my first sprint triathlon this past july but I ended up
    > not having enough time to train. So I've decided that I am going to do one next summer for sure
    > (most of the ones in my area seem to be over for now), and this fall and winter I'm going to do
    > enough so that, come summer, I just have to step up my training a little bit and not start
    > completely from scratch.
    >
    > I checked out trinewbies.com and found all of the great information there but I have a few other
    > questions.
    >
    > 1. The biggest question I have is about weight loss. I am a 22 year old female, 5'1 and 150 lbs
    > (I don't actually look as fat as that might sound - I know I am overweight but much of it is
    > muscle, especially my legs. I am definately a short and stocky built person). I am hoping to
    > lose about 20 pounds and would love to lose 30-40 (if that's realistic). How much do you think
    > I need to adjust my diet in order to achieve this on top of training? I am talking mostly
    > about calories (I know that I need to eat healthy foods instead of fatty foods and stuff like
    > that). I normally eat 1500-1800 calories a day and my weight doesn't really fluctuate with
    > that. I have experimented with eating less than that and have found that if I don't work out I
    > feel fine but if I do exercise I end up extremely hungry. Right now I am planning to alternate
    > swimming one day (between 4000-5000m) with biking the next day (about 7-10 miles for now
    > depending on time), taking 1 day off, and throwing a little bit of running in there each day
    > (not alot until I am built up, see the next question). Will that probably be enough for weight
    > loss or should i cut calories too? Also, how do I make sure I am not eating back the calories
    > that i just burned off because I'm hungry after working out? Sorry if these are stupid
    > questions but they are things I am having trouble with.
    >
    > 2. Also, I come from a competitive swimming background and still swim quite often. Put me in a
    > pool or lake and I can easily swim 5000m. But...make me run and I can barely run a mile. In
    > fact I can probably run 3/4 a mile at the most. Any advice on how to get into running shape?
    > At this point I am just doing a little each day as a warm-up before my swimming or biking
    > trying to build up some distance. Any other hints?
    >
    > 3. Also, a question for others of you from a swimming background: How do you balance your
    > training? Obviously you need to be good at all 3 sports, but there are time constraints for
    > training and everything. My first instinct is to focus hard on swimming because it is my best
    > part and the one part that I could have an advantage on. But from everything I've read on here
    > it sounds like I'm really not going to have much of an advantage because the distances aren't
    > really comparable. I might be best to focus on running, although I've never been a good runner
    > so I don't really think it will do much good. I'm not planning on going out and winning or
    > anything but I do want to do somewhat okay
    > :).
    >
    >
    > Thanks for any advice anyone can give me! If you e-mail me, please send it to [email protected]
    > (all I ever get at this aol address is junk so I hardly ever read it).
     
  9. Curt

    Curt Guest

    > Atkins wrote his book for severely overweight people who do not work out. The process of getting
    > proteins to synthesize into a carbohydrate like state is very taxing and time consuming. If you
    > are working out heavily, you do not have the time or energy to do this and you bonk (run out of
    > carbohydrates) frequently. Instead limit you simple sugars, like many breakfast cereals, soda,
    > fruit juices, candy and highly processed breads.

    Mike I agree with much of what you stated in your post, but I really need to point out that you have
    no idea what you are talking about when it comes to Atkins. I KNOW you didn't read the book if you
    can make the statement above. I am not severely overweight and I work out hard. I feel much better
    eating protein, fat and plenty of vegetables than I do when I am loading up on carbs. I learned this
    from reading the book and understanding how it works. Does it work for everyone? I doubt it, but it
    does work for
    me. I suggest you read the book if you are going to state falsehoods like you have done above. It
    really weakened your whole response.

    Please don't argue with me, unless you read the book first. Information from the media is usually
    not correct either. They continually show fat people eating steak and blue cheese for breakfast. I
    certainly don't do that.

    Your other points were good though. I do believe you can eat what you want to a point if you work
    out hard enough. If you want to lose fat faster you may want to consider Atkins. I used the word fat
    because on Atkins I really retained muscle while losing the weight. That is a big benefit.

    I did it to drop a quick 15 because I didn't want to run hard when I weighed a little over 200. Too
    hard on my joints IMO.

    Enjoy, Curt
     
  10. Tim

    Tim Guest

    Hi Jamie

    I ran my first triathlon last August and just tried to practice for the run by running. Started with
    a mile and then worked up to two and I was beat when I got done. Then I got a Polar heart monitor
    and found out what my aerobic heart was and started to train to that for a specific period of time.
    It was amazing the difference it made in my training. It seemed like I could run forever as long as
    I stayed in my aerobic zone. So I'd recommend that you get a heart rate monitor and a book on heart
    rate training and use that to get better at the run.

    You won't get a whole lot faster real quick but you'll be able to run longer distances.

    Anyway, that's my $0.02

    Tim
     
  11. Mike Lana

    Mike Lana Guest

    No I have not read the books. That and the Zone are on my must read list this year. I saw an
    interview with Atkins (I believe it was pbs) where he stated almost exactly what I said in the first
    sentence. There was one mistake I should have said the origin of his theory not his book. The rest
    of what I said in that paragraph was basic exercise physiology and nutrition 101. Sorry for the
    error. Mike
     
  12. kim belfield

    kim belfield New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2003
    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    0
    [jamie

    I couple of points for you re triathlons.

    1. Cut back on the swimming. It is the shortest component and the differnce between first and last will only be a few minutes and it sounds as though you could make the top bracket with your eyes shut. For the sprint distance just do twice the race distance at the most.
    2. Triathlons are more than three parts. the transitions (eg up and running from the water, the placement of gear, the ability to run beside your bike) will make or loose a huge amount of time.
    3. The transition from the bike to running is murder. I came from a running background and nearly died when I tried running after the bike. Your leg muscles have to be trained to run after riding so lots of practice in that area.
    4. Do lots of fartlett training in all disciplines. (check the internet)
    5. Get a training partner. preferrablably a cute one if you think the site of a nice bum infront of you may make you run better!!
    6. Weight loss is best achieved through running. Swimming will not loose weight. Best diet plan I can give you is inverse your meals. Large breakfast small dinner. Thus giving you the energy during the day when you need it. You then burn weight overnight.
    7. Get a good bike.
    8. Remember that it is as unlikely that you will finish last as it it is that you will finish first. Once you try one you will realise that you are there to test yourself - NO ONE ELSE and that it should be fun.

    Good Luck:)
     
  13. Dsmoothe

    Dsmoothe Guest

    Hey! If anyone wants a great deal on a Brand New Polar S720i Heart Rate Monitor(well below retail),
    send me an e-mail at [email protected]

    Thanks

    "Tim" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi Jamie
    >
    > I ran my first triathlon last August and just tried to practice for the run by running. Started
    > with a mile and then worked up to two and I was beat when I got done. Then I got a Polar heart
    > monitor and found out what my aerobic heart was and started to train to that for a specific period
    > of time. It was amazing the difference it made in my training. It seemed like I could run forever
    > as long as I stayed in my aerobic zone. So I'd recommend that you get a heart rate monitor and a
    > book on heart rate training and use that to get better at the run.
    >
    > You won't get a whole lot faster real quick but you'll be able to run longer distances.
    >
    > Anyway, that's my $0.02
    >
    > Tim
     
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