Training Hours



jagrazor

New Member
Apr 6, 2004
106
0
0
When and how do you increase training hours? Do you only increase for a few months each year? Is it bad to increase during the preperation and base periods?

Is the 10% rule the only way to go?

Should you stay at one level of volume for a really long time to get "really good at it"

This is my thoughts

The reason people tell younger athletes to train at a low amount of hours is so they become very effiecient in there movements at a low mileage/volume level. That way when they increase injuries are less likely to follow.

So how does one increase volume over a period of years. the 10% rule isn't very specific. Is there any research on increasing of volume?

How many years does it take to carefully, yet without wasting time to go from 0 hours to 30+ hours (beginner - pro level)

I'm not looking for the answer "everyone is different" I realize this and it is said all the time, the thing is. We are all similar so all answers for everyone would fall into a range at least :p
 

bikeshop

New Member
Nov 26, 2004
60
0
0
55
Training hours can be very specific or very general depending on the cyclists goals. Simply increasing training time by a percentage every so often is only one thin slice of the training pie. Becoming a faster, more fit, more efficient cyclist is much more involved than just saddle time. You have to look at specific exercises, durations and intensities at particular points in a yearly training plan to get the most benefit from your saddle time.
www.the-bike-shop.com/training
 

jagrazor

New Member
Apr 6, 2004
106
0
0
bikeshop said:
Training hours can be very specific or very general depending on the cyclists goals. Simply increasing training time by a percentage every so often is only one thin slice of the training pie. Becoming a faster, more fit, more efficient cyclist is much more involved than just saddle time. You have to look at specific exercises, durations and intensities at particular points in a yearly training plan to get the most benefit from your saddle time.
www.the-bike-shop.com/training


figures i wouldnt get a definitive answer :(

Someone needs to get volume down to a nearly exact science.. maybe me after i get my doctorate in Excersize science
 

jagrazor

New Member
Apr 6, 2004
106
0
0
How about this question

If I am training for a race that will take 2 hours to ride. Is there any point in going very much farther than 2 hours for any long ride?

Maybe an extra half hour to make sure you feel good @ the 2 hour point?

Besides that, intensity is #1 ?
 

bikeshop

New Member
Nov 26, 2004
60
0
0
55
Marathon racers dont train for marathons by running marathons.

So to train for a 2 hour race by riding lots of 2 hour rides is not the way to maximize your time. Like the first post, its a much more involved answer than just a simple sentence. I wish I could say, ride for 45 minutes as hard as you can 4 days a week and thats the answer. But its much more complex.

So what is the way to maximize your time? You have to train your energy systems to the maximum potential of each individual one.

First, work your aerobic system in the early season to build a large base on which to train. (The pyramids have a large base, and they reach very high).

Second, work on your anaerobic system with structured workouts designed to
increase your anaerobic threshold. Finally, in the specialization period of your training, you should tie it all together with race simulations and tempo drills peppered with intervals to activate all energy systems. I know this sounds like bike training soup, but its just not a 2 line answer type question. Hope it helps some though. www.the-bike-shop.com/training
 

jagrazor

New Member
Apr 6, 2004
106
0
0
bikeshop said:
Marathon racers dont train for marathons by running marathons.

So to train for a 2 hour race by riding lots of 2 hour rides is not the way to maximize your time. Like the first post, its a much more involved answer than just a simple sentence. I wish I could say, ride for 45 minutes as hard as you can 4 days a week and thats the answer. But its much more complex.

So what is the way to maximize your time? You have to train your energy systems to the maximum potential of each individual one.

First, work your aerobic system in the early season to build a large base on which to train. (The pyramids have a large base, and they reach very high).

Second, work on your anaerobic system with structured workouts designed to
increase your anaerobic threshold. Finally, in the specialization period of your training, you should tie it all together with race simulations and tempo drills peppered with intervals to activate all energy systems. I know this sounds like bike training soup, but its just not a 2 line answer type question. Hope it helps some though. www.the-bike-shop.com/training

I was only talking about your Long ride (which is usually done once a week or once ever two weeks?) the ride you continue to do to keep your endurance to a certain level throughout the year (except during the specialization/peak just before your big day)