training in rain

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by yk, Jan 4, 2006.

  1. yk

    yk Guest

    I have just started running outdoor. This a beginner's question. What do
    you do to keep your feet from getting wet ? Do people ware regular running
    shoes ? TIA
     
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  2. Dot

    Dot Guest

    yk wrote:

    > I have just started running outdoor. This a beginner's question. What do
    > you do to keep your feet from getting wet ? Do people ware regular running
    > shoes ? TIA
    >

    For most runs, most just use regular running shoes and socks. (For
    multiple hour runs with wet feet, there may be other issues - and why I
    said "most".)

    Some tips: Drainable shoes work best, so the water runs out. Waterproof
    shoes frequently capture the water so you slosh for a long time.
    Similarly thin socks, if they work for you, would dry faster than heavy
    socks. Some use vaseline on foot if expecting to be wet for a while.

    To dry your shoes when you're finished running, stuff with newspaper. I
    generally switch the newspaper after a couple hours or so, then leave
    them overnight with newspaper, then maybe a finishing touch without
    newspaper in the morning. It somewhat depends on whether it's summer or
    winter. Summer may be cool, damp indoors (no heat); while winter may be
    warm, dry (heat on).

    Hope that helps. Enjoy!

    Dot

    --
    "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste
    away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog
     
  3. yk

    yk Guest

    Thank you for the good advice.
     
  4. On 2006-01-05, yk <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I have just started running outdoor. This a beginner's question. What do
    > you do to keep your feet from getting wet ? Do people ware regular running
    > shoes ? TIA


    I wear smartwool socks. These of course get wet, but they still insulate
    reasonably well when that (inevitably) happens.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi
    http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  5. Tom Phillips

    Tom Phillips Guest

    Dot wrote:
    >
    > yk wrote:
    >
    > > I have just started running outdoor. This a beginner's question. What do
    > > you do to keep your feet from getting wet ? Do people ware regular running
    > > shoes ? TIA
    > >

    > For most runs, most just use regular running shoes and socks. (For
    > multiple hour runs with wet feet, there may be other issues - and why I
    > said "most".)
    >
    > Some tips: Drainable shoes work best, so the water runs out. Waterproof
    > shoes frequently capture the water so you slosh for a long time.


    "Waterproof" foot wear -- especially gore tex --
    doesn't work because (whether breathable or non)
    it simply traps moisture. Nonbreathable for
    obvious reasons and so-called breathable because
    there's not enough air space. For "most" of us
    regular "drainable" running shoes work best because
    at least some of the water can "slosh" out :)

    Course you'd know more about sloshing than most
    and wouldn't challenge your expertise there ;-)

    > Similarly thin socks, if they work for you, would dry faster than heavy
    > socks. Some use vaseline on foot if expecting to be wet for a while.
    >
    > To dry your shoes when you're finished running, stuff with newspaper. I
    > generally switch the newspaper after a couple hours or so, then leave
    > them overnight with newspaper, then maybe a finishing touch without
    > newspaper in the morning. It somewhat depends on whether it's summer or
    > winter. Summer may be cool, damp indoors (no heat); while winter may be
    > warm, dry (heat on).


    Yep -- just don't dry any foot wear fast, like with
    a hair dryer...
     
  6. anders

    anders Guest

    Dot wrote:

    > Some tips: Drainable shoes work best, so the water runs out. Waterproof
    > shoes frequently capture the water so you slosh for a long time.


    True, but if you can count on never landing in a too deep puddle, which
    often is the case when you run in urban enviroment (and only in
    moderate rain), waterproof shoes do have their advantages.

    OTOH if you splash the water (or the wet snow) you land in hard or long
    enough, your legs will get drenched and your socks will get soaked
    nevertheless, unless you wear waterproof gaitors, as for instance
    orienteers do.


    > Similarly thin socks, if they work for you, would dry faster than heavy
    > socks. Some use vaseline on foot if expecting to be wet for a while.


    In some extreme conditions, such as in the spring when the fastest
    route crosses peatland where the swamp water is still ice-cold
    orienteers can resort to long-legged thermosocks of 2mm neoprene.


    Anders
     
  7. Dot

    Dot Guest

    anders wrote:
    > Dot wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Some tips: Drainable shoes work best, so the water runs out. Waterproof
    >>shoes frequently capture the water so you slosh for a long time.

    >
    >
    > True, but if you can count on never landing in a too deep puddle, which
    > often is the case when you run in urban enviroment (and only in
    > moderate rain),


    true.

    > waterproof shoes do have their advantages.


    I've been considering water resistant / proof ones (if I find ones that
    work biomechanically for me) for dewy and frosty days since my
    breathable shoes get damp after a few hours - but not enough moisture to
    need to worry about draining.

    >
    > OTOH if you splash the water (or the wet snow) you land in hard or long
    > enough, your legs will get drenched and your socks will get soaked
    > nevertheless, unless you wear waterproof gaitors, as for instance
    > orienteers do.


    Are the waterproof gaitors in addition to the neoprene socks you mention
    below? Or do they come over the toes? Examples (link)? Maybe that's what
    I need to do is look at orienteering gear. A couple years ago when I did
    one course, I noticed the experienced folks had different running gear -
    snag resistant/proof. Until you mentioned it, I hadn't given any thought
    to different footwear they might use.

    Something I've considered doing is taking neoprene socks, cutting the
    bottom out, and putting a tie under the sole to keep it in place. Or at
    least a toe-cap like for skiing. Most gaitors I've seen, just cover the
    ankle and not the foot, but I do have one pair that covers the shoe
    laces (not ones I'd run in).

    The neoprene overbooties that I use for snowshoe running work so well
    that I'm trying to mimic something like that when I don't have snowshoes
    on. (They're actually for biking and what kept my feet from freezing in
    tri, but ss ones are similar.)
    >
    >
    >
    >>Similarly thin socks, if they work for you, would dry faster than heavy
    >>socks. Some use vaseline on foot if expecting to be wet for a while.

    >
    >
    > In some extreme conditions, such as in the spring when the fastest
    > route crosses peatland where the swamp water is still ice-cold
    > orienteers can resort to long-legged thermosocks of 2mm neoprene.


    Thanks. That's what our trails are like during breakup. ;) :( Don't
    have to ice feet afterwards. ;)

    Seriously, I've got an assortment of things like neoprene socks,
    sealskinz, etc (that I'd gotten for bike leg of winter tri I did 4 yr
    ago), and after re-considering a number of options, have been
    considering trying them. I know some local runners report blisters with
    them, but gosh, maybe I would, maybe I wouldn't. Won't know until I try.
    Will try with liner socks though, as my feet were cold in sealskinz the
    one time I tried.

    Right now we're dusty dry or ice in most areas so no place to really
    test right now unless we get frost again or I find some open water, but
    I'm not an extremist. ;)

    Thanks again. You got me thinking about some other approaches.

    Dot

    --
    "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste
    away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog
     
  8. Dot

    Dot Guest

    Tom Phillips wrote:

    >
    > Dot wrote:


    Summer may be cool, damp indoors (no heat); while winter may be
    >>warm, dry (heat on).

    >
    >
    > Yep -- just don't dry any foot wear fast, like with
    > a hair dryer...


    I should clarify: the "no heat" / "heat on" referred to home heat, not a
    dryer. I did find out this summer that if it's 100% humidity and raining
    outside and there's no heat on in the house (summer), then there's no
    reason for the shoes to be able to air dry by themselves (drip the worst
    of it off, but not the dampness), hence more changes of newspaper.

    Dot

    --
    "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste
    away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog
     
  9. Holmbrew

    Holmbrew Guest

    I have been doing a lot of running in the rain and on wet trails this
    season and to keep my feet dry I decided to try a pair of Montrail
    Susitna II's. They are a bit different from other GoreTex shoes in that
    the outer most shell is the waterproof layer and *not* some inner layer,
    keeping the shoes from getting water logged. They also come witha low,
    integrated, waterproof gater. I was skeptical at first, but I have about
    130 miles of dry feet.

    This is the shoe I bought:

    http://www.backcountryoutlet.com/outlet/MON0015/Montrail-Susitna-XCR-Trail-Running-Shoe-Mens.html

    They worn pretty darn good in keeping me dry.

    -Jason

    yk wrote:
    > I have just started running outdoor. This a beginner's question. What do
    > you do to keep your feet from getting wet ? Do people ware regular running
    > shoes ? TIA
    >
    >
     
  10. Doug Freese

    Doug Freese Guest

    "Dot" <[email protected]#duh?att.net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I should clarify: the "no heat" / "heat on" referred to home heat, not
    > a dryer. I did find out this summer that if it's 100% humidity and
    > raining outside and there's no heat on in the house (summer), then
    > there's no reason for the shoes to be able to air dry by themselves
    > (drip the worst of it off, but not the dampness), hence more changes
    > of newspaper.



    And why I like to circulate more than one pair. :)

    -DougF
     
  11. anders

    anders Guest

    Dot kirjoitti:


    > I've been considering water resistant / proof ones (if I find ones that
    > work biomechanically for me) for dewy and frosty days since my
    > breathable shoes get damp after a few hours - but not enough moisture to
    > need to worry about draining.


    "Water repellent" is sufficient for running, "water proof" is better
    left for activities where you need to wade through water.

    (Not meant as a tip or a recommendation, but Puma Complete Trailfox is
    a shoe that is getting the best word-of-mouth rave reviews since New
    Balance 900s.)


    > Are the waterproof gaitors in addition to the neoprene socks you mention
    > below? Or do they come over the toes? Examples (link)?


    In my orienteering days the neoprene socks weren't yet around and I
    must admit I have no idea whether they have, when worn, rendered the
    gaitors redundant. The gaitors indeed do not come over the toes, merely
    the ankle and the heel. (For a photograph - which unfortunately doesn't
    reveal that strategic area - go to http://www.suunnistajankauppa.fi
    click on the sock -> tuotteet -> asusteet -> säärisuojat.) In
    "normal" wet conditions they work suprisingly well in keeping your
    socks dry, as well as pieces of dirt (fine sand and dust aren't
    problems here)out of your shoes - and they double as Achilles warmers
    in winter (although I prefer my homely old woolen sock legs).


    > Right now we're dusty dry or ice in most areas so no place to really
    > test right now unless we get frost again or I find some open water, but
    > I'm not an extremist. ;)


    Here it's snow that turned to slush and refroze and then got a day of
    rain on top of it and refroze - the paths are runnable but as hard on
    the legs as frozen asphalt:-(

    For near-by skiing there's only one cannon-snow loop of about a mile -
    full of ill-tempered ski-crazy male menopause sufferers:)


    Anders
     
  12. Doug Freese

    Doug Freese Guest

    "Donovan Rebbechi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On 2006-01-05, yk <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> I have just started running outdoor. This a beginner's question.
    >> What do
    >> you do to keep your feet from getting wet ? Do people ware regular
    >> running
    >> shoes ? TIA

    >
    > I wear smartwool socks. These of course get wet, but they still
    > insulate
    > reasonably well when that (inevitably) happens.



    I bought a pair last year to experiment with and have very good luck
    with warm feet in almost all conditions. My Wigwam's also worked but I
    like to experiment. The other day we had a mix of snow and rain and the
    roads were slush - I chose not to run. I couldn't muster the hubris to
    take on two inches of cold water to test any socks. Color me a shameful
    red. :)

    -DF
     
  13. Doug Freese wrote:
    > The other day we had a mix of snow and rain [...] I chose not to run.


    Auditioning for the Nancy Lance-y Winter Wuss Club? ;-)

    Pendejo, who ran in hail with 35 mph gusts a couple days ago (note to
    self for 11.75 months from now - 2006 training year, craziest weather)
     
  14. rick++

    rick++ Guest

    Getting wet isnt a problem.
    It only happens when its above 28F or so, and the increased
    foot circulation keeps me warm.

    However footwear and socks should be completely dried between
    runs, or else this enhances bad skin conditions.
     
  15. The Dolt

    The Dolt Guest

    On Wed, 4 Jan 2006 22:09:26 -0800, "yk" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I have just started running outdoor. This a beginner's question. What do
    >you do to keep your feet from getting wet ? Do people ware regular running
    >shoes ? TIA
    >


    Frickin' pussy.
     
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