Training in the dark

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by Leon, Nov 16, 2003.

  1. Leon

    Leon New Member

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    How many of you train in the dark ? Any tips for doing so ? What lights do you use etc.

    Given the long nights in winter I am sure there is lots of experience from northern hemisphere members.

    Leon
     
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  2. mnetherc

    mnetherc New Member

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    During autumn and into winter I train in the dark in the mornings before work (I'm in Sydney, Aust). Its not too bad, I think the two biggest tips is to have a decent light and to know the road you're training on.

    As for lights I have a Vistalite (10w globe) with a Nimh battery and lasts approx 1hr 20mins, the 5w lasts about 2.5-3hrs I think, I've never used it. The 10w is bright enough to light up the road ahead and avoid anything. I bought the lights as a set (called Code15).

    Its also probably a good idea to know the road well enough in the daytime so when it comes to training in the dark you know of all the potholes or the dangers to be wary of. Keep an eye out for cars too, it doesn't matter how many lights you have on you're still hard to see in the early/late hours.
     
  3. rkohler

    rkohler New Member

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    Cyclops Trainer. Ride inside when it's dark outside. Safer, easier, warmer...and how many races will you be doing in the dark anyway? You can get some really good, focused workouts in without having to worry about lighting if you use a trainer. And they cost just about as much as a good headlight for your bike.
    Enjoy! :p
     
  4. GuyStevens

    GuyStevens New Member

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  5. GuyStevens

    GuyStevens New Member

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    And how many races do you do indoors on a static trainer?

    The majority of my training in the winter is done after work and in the dark. Speeds are the same as daytime training so it is equally as beneficial.

    I've been risking life and limb for several winters with a little 5w Specialized light but about to purchase Lupine's Passublo XC.
     
  6. rkohler

    rkohler New Member

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    Lots of races...go to www.racesonyourtrainer.com . They're everywhere!

    If you want to buy a better light then that would work fine, but it's just a little more dangerous being out at night in the cold (and maybe snow). Plus without having to get so much clothing together for the ride, you could spend more time riding and less time dressing and undressing. Some trainers really offer great resistance for harder workouts, and smooth resistance for the longer ones.
     
  7. jordon198

    jordon198 New Member

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    My 2 cents worth: When I ride at night I don't get as much out of the ride as I should. I spend more time going slower than normal looking out for road hazards. If you're dead set on doing it try and find a well lit area that you can get to know in the daylight.

    Take what I say with a grain of salt, I'm new to cycling and everything I just said might be bad advice, its just what I've found to be the case with me. Be careful.
     
  8. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    Leon: OK, you're located at 22* S, on the Atlantic... are you just trying to make us northern hemisphere guys jealous now as we approach the winter?

    Seriously, do you have good roads for biking there? Between the mountains and coast, looks like great terrain. Imagine mountain bikes would be popular.

    Dan
     
  9. Leon

    Leon New Member

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    Not to many tarred (paved) roads around, basically one leading south and one leading east (which most of us use for road training). The options as far as MTB is concerned are endless lots of gravel roads and basically the whole Namib desert to play in.

    In our winter time day light is a bit of an issue hence my question. A couple of us have been talking about MTB in the dark in the winter. Will probably provide a whole new dimension to it. I was hoping to get some good tips wrt lights etc. Will probably have to import them.

    The lengts people go to ride their bikes.....


    Leon
     
  10. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    Thanks for reply. After-work road and MTB night rides are done here in the winter also. I don't have the lights, but most folks seem to use the rechargeable battery systems with the dual 5W/10W headlights on the handlebars.

    Dan
     
  11. GuyStevens

    GuyStevens New Member

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    Oh the irony of life! Been riding for years with a crappy front light set-up and had no accidents. First ride with my Lupine Passubio XC's tonight and what happens? A Volvo estate barges into me and sends me sliding across the tarmac! Thank god it was a side impact and not front-on. I'm impressed with the Lupine's though and will make a point of them in my police statement tomorrow!
     
  12. rkohler

    rkohler New Member

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    Hope you're ok! How ironic though. Take interest in an indoor trainer yet? ;) j/k
     
  13. GuyStevens

    GuyStevens New Member

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    Yes, I'm OK cheers - just cuts and bruises.

    Turbo training is the worst form of hell as far as I'm concerned so I'll continue with my night-time rides! I've been hit 3 times in 14 years but it's a risk all cyclists take when they venture onto the roads.
     
  14. Geonz

    Geonz New Member

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    I, too, find it very hard to work hard in the dark because ... well, b ecause it's dark. But trainers are dull, too, so depends on the weather and my mood.
    Sorry about the crash, Guy -- really ironic (unless you weren't being as careful because you felt like you were so much more visible). And it does at least make your statement to the police better :)
     
  15. shh123

    shh123 New Member

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    I can highly recommend that you buy a pair of lumilights, see http://www.lumicycle.co.uk/. They have continuously been rated the best lights available. I am now on my 3rd winter using these lights, and this has been some of the best money I have ever invested.

    Cycling regards. Soren
     
  16. ffvelazquezh

    ffvelazquezh New Member

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    In some instances training in the darkness is more a need than a desire. In my own case, I have to train very early in the morning due to my job schedule (5:00 AM) and I have been fortunate because in two years of training I have not suffered any accident. and from my own experience I recommend to follow the following simple rules:

    1. To select a route in form of closed circuit with at least 5-10 kms for lap. Choose for the ride the route with the less traffic or traffic lights as possible. Avoid to travel in sense contrary to the traffic, in order to not to be dazzled by the lights of the vehicles that come in contrary sense.
    2. To sometimes make the ride with day light in order to know it better.
    3. To install two front lights at least. The first of them for continuous use and the second like back up or replacement in the event of flaw of the first one.
    As important than the front light, is to install a sparkling red light at the rear of the bicycle. This will allow us to be more visible for the drivers.
    5. Always dress white sweater,
    6. Make The first lap at very low speed. This will allow us to identify any last time obstacle (holes, dogs, etc).
    7. Be aware about the car lights at your back. When you "feel" one, take your right side as fast as you can.

    Try it and Enjoy
     
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