Training indoors

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Brendo, May 7, 2006.

  1. Brendo

    Brendo Guest

    My wife and I just bought a magnetic gel roller trainer. Given
    that we are newish riders (<150km)from a non riding background,
    how would we get the most benefit from the trainer? Do we just
    jump on and thrash about for 30min or an hour, and then go for a
    'real' ride on the weekend, or is there a better way to do it? We
    just want to build our fitness to a level where we can ride 50km
    without it sounding terrifying, and also to start racing in club
    events (mostly 40 - 60km road at the moment, crits are through
    summer). Any ideas??
     
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  2. "Brendo" wrote:
    > My wife and I just bought a magnetic gel roller trainer. Given that we are
    > newish riders (<150km)from a non riding background, how would we get the
    > most benefit from the trainer?


    Throw it in the back corner of your garage (that's where most of these
    things lie) and ride your bike to work. On the weekend or after work go for
    ride in the great outdoors and enjoy the sunny/windy/rainy/calm weather of
    your town's delightful autumn.

    > Do we just jump on and thrash about for 30min or an hour, and then go for
    > a 'real' ride on the weekend, or is there a better way to do it?


    Despite some statements from a.b. riders about the spectacular miles and
    speeds they put in on their trainers, most secretly know that these torture
    devices were first invented by Baron von Drais de Sauerbrun to punish those
    members of the nouveau riche who described his Draisene as "a machine whose
    time has passed"

    Punish yourself, if you so desire. Me, I'll ride my bike!

    --
    Cheers
    Peter

    ~~~ ~ [email protected]
    ~~ ~ _- \,
    ~~ (*)/ (*)
     
  3. Brendo

    Brendo Guest

    Peter Signorini wrote:
    > "Brendo" wrote:
    >
    >>My wife and I just bought a magnetic gel roller trainer. Given that we are
    >>newish riders (<150km)from a non riding background, how would we get the
    >>most benefit from the trainer?

    >
    >
    > Throw it in the back corner of your garage (that's where most of these
    > things lie) and ride your bike to work. On the weekend or after work go for
    > ride in the great outdoors and enjoy the sunny/windy/rainy/calm weather of
    > your town's delightful autumn.


    Well and good, but I will have a bit of trouble pulling a dual
    axle trailer full of mowing equipment along though... My wife
    works 45km away as well, so 'ride to work' isn't really an
    option. And 3 or 4 times a week it will be 7:00pm before we get
    home. Hence the indoor trainer...
    >
    >
    >>Do we just jump on and thrash about for 30min or an hour, and then go for
    >>a 'real' ride on the weekend, or is there a better way to do it?

    >
    >
    > Despite some statements from a.b. riders about the spectacular miles and
    > speeds they put in on their trainers, most secretly know that these torture
    > devices were first invented by Baron von Drais de Sauerbrun to punish those
    > members of the nouveau riche who described his Draisene as "a machine whose
    > time has passed"


    We haven't got any kind of measuring device on it, we just ride
    for as long and as constant as we can.
    >
    > Punish yourself, if you so desire. Me, I'll ride my bike!

    As will we, just that indoors is the most practical place to ride
    it during the week :)
    >
     
  4. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    Peter Signorini wrote:
    > "Brendo" wrote:
    > > My wife and I just bought a magnetic gel roller trainer. Given that we are
    > > newish riders (<150km)from a non riding background, how would we get the
    > > most benefit from the trainer?

    >
    > Throw it in the back corner of your garage (that's where most of these
    > things lie) and ride your bike to work. On the weekend or after work go for
    > ride in the great outdoors and enjoy the sunny/windy/rainy/calm weather of
    > your town's delightful autumn.


    Not today they wouldn't have! Urgh ... but yes, get out and ride your
    bikes, spinners are really only useful as part of a structured training
    program (IMO) - without some sort of plan you will very quickly lose
    interest in riding. At least, that's my advice, others here may
    disagree :)

    > > Do we just jump on and thrash about for 30min or an hour, and then go for
    > > a 'real' ride on the weekend, or is there a better way to do it?

    >
    > Despite some statements from a.b. riders about the spectacular miles and
    > speeds they put in on their trainers, most secretly know that these torture
    > devices were first invented by Baron von Drais de Sauerbrun to punish those
    > members of the nouveau riche who described his Draisene as "a machine whose
    > time has passed"


    Not that many people here would put in much time on a spinner - it's
    the most boring thing in the world without a plan. And even with a plan
    it can suck.

    That's the key, have a plan.

    If you want to do some racing, and some real miles (50km is a warmup :)
    ) then you need to work your way up to it. Join your local cycling
    club, read some books on structured training. As lots of questions and
    be skeptical about the advice you receive from everyone. I suggest one
    of the better books is Joe Friel's "The Cyclists Training Bible", but
    there's many of them. Consider coaching if you get keen - some clubs
    will have club coaches that can help you for free, others will
    recommend or suggest professional coaching which may be less expensive
    than you think if you shop around - I have a conflict of interest, I
    have a small cycle coaching business, so please take that last bit of
    advice with a grain of salt.

    Spin trainers are a necessary evil in very cold climates, and if you're
    doing specific high intensity interval work, but as a subsitute for
    real riding they're a long way from being ideal. I run a weekly spin
    training session over "winter" with the club I'm a member and coach at,
    so I feel a little qualified to make suggestions in this area :)
     
  5. rooman

    rooman New Member

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  6. "Brendo" wrote:
    >
    > We haven't got any kind of measuring device on it, we just ride for as
    > long and as constant as we can.


    On a more serious note, my limited experience with a trainer, during two
    periods when I was injured and unable to ride, was that 15-20 mins on one
    was as hard as the steeper hill climbs in the Dandenongs near Melbourne.
    Lack of ventilation had me breaking out in a torrential sweat. After 30 mins
    the sweat in my eyes and the shear breathlessness forced me off the beast.
    And this was on the lowest setting on this mag trainer! I reckon putting in
    short bursts of 15 mins a couple of times a day should see your fitness pick
    up pretty quickly. But you don't get the practice with real roads - curves,
    changing gear and cadence for hills, honking out of the saddle, sprinting
    for the crest, etc.
    >>
    >> Punish yourself, if you so desire. Me, I'll ride my bike!

    > As will we, just that indoors is the most practical place to ride it
    > during the week :)


    And riding a trainer can get so mind-numbingly boring. The one I'd borrowed
    first time was too noisy to allow me to watch TV. The second period when I
    was using one I put it out under the back verandah for some fresh air, so no
    TV, but the garden was nice to look at.

    --
    Cheers
    Peter

    ~~~ ~ [email protected]
    ~~ ~ _- \,
    ~~ (*)/ (*)
     
  7. "rooman" wrote:

    >> when the weather turns for the worst, or you want to supplement your
    >> rides without heading out, the trainer is easier and more fun than
    >> climbing up and down a staircase with the wet washing...


    I'll go and get the washing now.
    ;-)

    --
    Cheers
    Peter

    ~~~ ~ [email protected]
    ~~ ~ _- \,
    ~~ (*)/ (*)
     
  8. Andrew Price

    Andrew Price Guest

    Brendo asks -

    > My wife and I just bought a magnetic gel roller trainer. Given that we are
    > newish riders (<150km)from a non riding background, how would we get the
    > most benefit from the trainer?


    The real question is what will continue to motivate you to jointly pursue a
    wonderful healthy sport, and a wind trainer does have a part in that.

    As others have posted, the enjoyment comes from getting out there on a bike,
    usually with agreeable company. Trainers can help with that by -

    Giving you a stable easy platform to try changes in postion (seat height and
    reach) and stem length and height - you need to make sure you are
    comfortable and in the most efficient position for getting the effort to the
    back wheel.

    Letting you get used to cleats on your shoes where you are not under
    pressure, if you are not already using them.

    Letting you turn a wheel when pressure of time, injuries or weather would
    otherwise stop you getting out at all.

    And lastly by making you stronger, quickly - IF (a big if) you get and work
    to a plan. Bleve is spot on in his comments about the worth of coaches -
    especially if you want to go club riding or racing. If I had my time again
    that is the one person I would have sought out sooner - otherwise your just
    a part of the chorus to Paul Kelly's song, "I've done all the dumb things"

    The advantage of trainers is that you can stay at a level of exertion
    unaffected by the real world hassles such as traffic lights, traffic and
    bunches who want to go at an inconsistent pace or a pace that's wrong for
    you - but to take advantage of that precision in setting levels of exertion
    you need to have a program or plan you are working to that is a series of
    progressions from one level to another.

    I have found they work best when combined with ordinary riding, which gives
    you a reference point to see if you are getting stronger.

    Oh, and get a fan (the bigger and stronger the better), a portable music
    player and a sweat protector for the bike (aka a towell)

    That just leaves the choice of music that does help to pass otherwise boring
    time - if it starts you on your way one track I have found is My White
    Bicycle by Tomorrow produced in 1967 by Pete Townsend of the Who - but I
    think that dates me rather badly - any music download site will have it.
    YMMV.

    best, Andrew (who is contemplating a white track bike)
     
  9. Use the trainer for intervals only ! you can do hill sprints, spin sprints,
    Fartlek etc. Buy a Heart Rate monitor if you have not got one already, as
    you can use the alarms at various heart rates or times to keep you
    motivated, it is just like having a personal coach beside you as you listen
    to your MP3 player quietly so you can here the alarms on the watch.
    My tip is vary your training & you won't get board.


    "Andrew Price" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Brendo asks -
    >
    > > My wife and I just bought a magnetic gel roller trainer. Given that we

    are
    > > newish riders (<150km)from a non riding background, how would we get the
    > > most benefit from the trainer?

    >
    > The real question is what will continue to motivate you to jointly pursue

    a
    > wonderful healthy sport, and a wind trainer does have a part in that.
    >
    > As others have posted, the enjoyment comes from getting out there on a

    bike,
    > usually with agreeable company. Trainers can help with that by -
    >
    > Giving you a stable easy platform to try changes in postion (seat height

    and
    > reach) and stem length and height - you need to make sure you are
    > comfortable and in the most efficient position for getting the effort to

    the
    > back wheel.
    >
    > Letting you get used to cleats on your shoes where you are not under
    > pressure, if you are not already using them.
    >
    > Letting you turn a wheel when pressure of time, injuries or weather would
    > otherwise stop you getting out at all.
    >
    > And lastly by making you stronger, quickly - IF (a big if) you get and

    work
    > to a plan. Bleve is spot on in his comments about the worth of coaches -
    > especially if you want to go club riding or racing. If I had my time again
    > that is the one person I would have sought out sooner - otherwise your

    just
    > a part of the chorus to Paul Kelly's song, "I've done all the dumb things"
    >
    > The advantage of trainers is that you can stay at a level of exertion
    > unaffected by the real world hassles such as traffic lights, traffic and
    > bunches who want to go at an inconsistent pace or a pace that's wrong for
    > you - but to take advantage of that precision in setting levels of

    exertion
    > you need to have a program or plan you are working to that is a series of
    > progressions from one level to another.
    >
    > I have found they work best when combined with ordinary riding, which

    gives
    > you a reference point to see if you are getting stronger.
    >
    > Oh, and get a fan (the bigger and stronger the better), a portable music
    > player and a sweat protector for the bike (aka a towell)
    >
    > That just leaves the choice of music that does help to pass otherwise

    boring
    > time - if it starts you on your way one track I have found is My White
    > Bicycle by Tomorrow produced in 1967 by Pete Townsend of the Who - but I
    > think that dates me rather badly - any music download site will have it.
    > YMMV.
    >
    > best, Andrew (who is contemplating a white track bike)
    >
    >
     
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