Training routine for novice

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by Crazy Animal, Nov 29, 2004.

  1. Crazy Animal

    Crazy Animal New Member

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    I started cycling this year after discovering the biking bug through mountain biking. Not long after I got a road bike and its road cycling i've been doing most of recently (winter).

    Whats the best novice road training routine?

    40 miles is my threshold just now before I get cramps in my quads which force me to stop.

    What sort of distances and hours on the saddle should i be committing myself to at the moment? I want to start building up to 50-60miles hopefully by next summer.

    I'm also heavy for a roady at 16 stone (used to be a powerlifter) and should I take this into account when planning training?
     
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  2. MrCjolsen

    MrCjolsen New Member

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    I'm little more than a novice myself. Just a few things.

    Just as in running or swimming, your training should be a mix of long distance rides, and short fast intervals.

    If your calves cramp up, there might be something amiss with your riding style or your bike adustment. Check your seat height and your cadeance. It should be at least 90-100 rpm.
     
  3. Carrera

    Carrera New Member

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    I used to get a very annoying cramp in my foot. It would especially kick in while climbing right around the toes.


     
  4. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    If you back off the pace maybe 0.5 mph during the first half of the ride, and avoid jumping out of the saddle on climbs, believe you'll delay the cramping on your 40-mile.

    But, cramping quads are normal if you're pushing your aerobic endurance limit. It's going to take lots of miles and recovery time for you to build up the cardio-vascular supply to the cycling leg muscles.

    I don't think you should commit to any fixed weekly schedule of miles or time. I'd just work on building up your longer ride distances now. Do the 40 mile ride every week if possible, and when you're comfortable and enjoying that distance, then go to 45 miles. When that's comfortable, move up until you get to 60 and beyond. Don't try to follow any prescribed program that says you need to add X miles per week...just move up when your body tells you you're ready for more.

    Speed will come naturally as you gain aerobic capacity. I wouldn't suggest any race-interval training until you've completed at least a season and several thousand miles. You don't need to hurt yourself to progress in this sport; a good foundation is the important thing now. Enjoy your rides...that's the main thing.
     
  5. Crazy Animal

    Crazy Animal New Member

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    Thanks mate.
     
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