Training schedule for 300km route

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by John Picton, Dec 12, 2003.

  1. John Picton

    John Picton New Member

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    I'm quite new to the whole cycling thing and have become involved in a group who want to do a 300km route in Sweden next June.

    At the moment I cycle to work and back (around 16 miles) then do around a 30 mile route at the weekend. I want to increase this considerably in the new year but am not sure what the best course of action to take is.

    If anyone has any recommendations for training and diet I would be grateful for your comments.

    Thanks
     
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  2. blip

    blip New Member

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    I assume that your 300km is going to be a ride as opposed to a race? Asuming it is a ride then your best plan of attack is a simple one. Ride your bike as much as you can. If it were a race i would suggest intervals. hill work, sprint training blah blah. Given it is a long leisure ride I would just ride / train as often and for as long as my time and circumstances allow. Eat good food, plenty of fruit and vegies and you will be fine. The associated benefit of getting in shape is that when you are In Sweden you will get a better look at the scenery because you will not be drooling all over the handlebars ;-)
     
  3. Unregistered

    Unregistered New Member

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    I would have thought the whole point of cycling in Sweden in June was to drool all over the handlebars at the passing scenery (the non-stationary variety in particular) .....
     
  4. John Picton

    John Picton New Member

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    Thanks for your post. You are right, it is a "leisure" ride rather than a race, although it does sound odd calling it leisure!

    I'm not a competitive cyclist, but I am quite serious about the whole thing. I've spent a little bit of cash upgrading my bike and getting a some kit so now I can tackle most routes regardless of weather.

    My motives for doing it are that it seems to be like Swedens version of the London Marathon on bikes so should be good fun. I also really wanted to start exercising again, so currently cycle to and from work every weekday (around a 16 mile round trip), then try to do a longer route at the weekend (around 30 - 40 mile).

    Do you think that I should carry on with the commuting and just extend the weekend trips?

    Good point about the scenery!
     
  5. blip

    blip New Member

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    Carry on commuting AND do the weekend trips. As I said the more cycling you do the more you will enjoy it. The cycling will not be bad either hahahahah

    Have fun.
     
  6. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    I've just read the book "Long Distance Cycling" by Burke and Pavelka. It has some graduated training schedules tailored for those preparing for a Century or Double Century. The programs do have a weekend ride which is extended each week, up to about 75% of the final event mileage.

    Good luck. I'm sure you'll complete the event....a good training program would likely reduce the pain and suffering though!

    Dan
     
  7. jmcmillanut

    jmcmillanut New Member

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    John-

    I did a single-day 296km ride/race this September (the LOTOJA -- Logan, Utah, to Jackson Hole, Wyoming). I just rode to finish, because it was my first season of road biking. Here's what I did to get ready:

    1) I had a similar base level of riding as you have when I started training in earnest -- about 3 months out.

    2) I kept up my normal riding routine (10-30 miles/d) during the week w/ commuting and lunch / afterwork rides.

    3) I started the 1st weekend training w/ a longer ride, about 50 miles.

    4) Then the next weekend, I did a century.

    5) I alternated subsequent weekends w/ 50 miles one weekend and a century the next.

    6) I made sure my last century was 2 weeks prior to the LOTOJA, and I only commuted to work (at a spinning cadence -- no power sprints) the three days before the ride (no extra riding).

    7) During training, don't EVER forget recovery time, because time off the bike is as important as time on. Plan in 1-2 rest days/ week.

    On this schedule, I averaged about 150 miles per week. By the time I hit the LOTOJA, I had 5 centuries under my belt, and was feeling strong. I finished the ride (it was on a Saturday) and was feeling good enough to ride to work the next Monday.

    [The LOTOJA is a major event in the Intermountain U.S., w/ over 900 participants this year. They have some great long-distance ride training tips on their website: http://www.epek.com/LOTOJA/]

    Cheers,
    James

    P.S. - Also, don't forget to consider the terrain you'll be riding in. Try and find similar topographic variation wherever you ride to mimic the Swedish terrain.
     
  8. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    Sounds like a great training program. Certainly agree on the importance of recovery and a smart taper in the last week.

    Question: Did you do the long 100 mile training rides by yourself? I want to get in shape for comfortable centuries and longer rides next season, but can't see to get motivated to go longer than about 35 miles when training by myself.

    Dan
     
  9. jmcmillanut

    jmcmillanut New Member

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    I did three by myself this year, and the other two were organized centuries. We have spectacular scenery on the Wasatch Front, and that's what allows me to ride alone for hours.

    Actually, my greatest accomplishment this year (or maybe ever) was a mtb century. It was harder than the 300km road ride. I rode it in Canyonlands Nat'l Park (the White Rim Trail) this past January, and did the entire deal self-supported. In retrospect, it was a pretty stupid idea since there is no one out in the desert that time of year.

    So, I guess that's how I motivate myself to ride big rides -- it's a mental and physical challenge. And though it may suck while you're doing it, when it's over, you're glad you did it. It's a big confidence booster.

    S'long
    James
     
  10. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    Thanks...this helps to crank up the motivation for next season.

    Dan
     
  11. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    Thanks...this helps me to crank up the motivation.

    Dan
     
  12. ffvelazquezh

    ffvelazquezh New Member

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    Heve you read the Pavelka&Burke's book??

    What do you think about it?? I just have read some publicity in Amazon Book club and I was dubious to buy it.
     
  13. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    It gives an interesting overview of what you'll encounter riding long-distance events. But, not too as much on specific training advice. There is some good background material and tips from experts in RAAM and PBP, but a lot of the material and advice seems pretty basic general in nature. Also, the book seemed to ramble a bit.

    I think if you've been riding a lot of distance events already you might not find it too helpful. Suppose the chapter on sleep deprivation and when to sleep during continuous multi-day events was fairly interesting, since I've never ridden any of those.
     
  14. ffvelazquezh

    ffvelazquezh New Member

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    Thanks DHK for your answer.
    Some advice about similar books??
     
  15. Guru_2_u_2

    Guru_2_u_2 New Member

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    Like others here, I would recommend riding lots. Randonneurs (there are plenty of Randonneuring organizations in Switzerland, look one up) generally do specific training during the week (intervals, speed, hills, etc) and then on Sat or Sun, a long ride of increasing distance.

    If your ride is 300K straight, then a time of 20 hours should be pretty easy to accomplish for someone who has good base fitness and trains for 16-20 weeks.

    Two weeks before the 300K, you should be able to ride 200K in 10-12 hours, the week before the ride you should do a slow 100K ride (along with slow rides during the week days).

    From here, it is all about staying with the bike no matter how sore your butt gets, and if possible arrange for a change of shorts.

    Oh, and one last thing. Eat. No matter what, learn to put at least 1000 calories into your body every 60-80km (stop and eat, lots of pasta with some protein), along with another 100 or so calories per hour on the bike. More calories would be good, but this is a minimum. If you were going longer, then you need more on the bike, but if you eat this you will finish.

    If you eat, your muscles can go forever, and with enough caffeine, you can go without sleeping too!
     
  16. John Picton

    John Picton New Member

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    Sorry about the delay in a reply, thanks to everyone for their genuinely useful comments.

    I've bought the book you all suggested and now am beginning to understand what I need to do!

    Thanks again
     
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