Training to race

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by Karlo, May 14, 2003.

  1. Karlo

    Karlo New Member

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    Hi everyone. I'm just getting serious about bicycle racing, and I'm looking for a good training plan to go with. Currently I'm just riding a lot (well, maybe not as much as you, but a lot for me.), and entering occasional races. Last weekend I managed a tenth place finish (not so impressive when you consider that there were only 25 people in the race) in a local road race. This was an encouragement because it is the first time that I've actually stayed with the pack for the whole race, but now I want more.

    Does anyone have any advice for finding a training routine that will put me across the line first?

    Thanks,
    Karlo
     
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  2. J-MAT

    J-MAT New Member

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    Karlo:

    Certain training principles apply to all riders, but training schedules are highly individual, and vary considerably between riders.

    Since you are starting out, you should focus on developing a "base" which is the foundation all your speed and power will be built on. A house or building without the proper foundation will collapse eventually. Your body is no different.

    You can still race and train hard, but you should spend most of your time logging easy/moderate miles. You need a solid base in order to prevent knee injuries, and to absorb and recover from high-intensity workouts.

    There are two "bases." Your yearly base is what you do in a given year, while your cumulative base is what you have done year after year. Professional riders have many, many years of cumulative base and this is what allows them to race 120 miles a day for three weeks in the national tours without falling apart.

    "Base" mileage is normally done in the winter months, with speed/power training starting in January/February.

    Over time you will find what your capabilities are and what works for you. Read some good books on cycling or hire a coach. After lots of trial and error, you will find a program that works for you.

    It takes a long time, (many years) to get to the top. Don't rush it, and enjoy the "ride" along the way.

    Good luck!!!
     
  3. Karlo

    Karlo New Member

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    It sounds like your sage advice is to just put in the miles without getting concerned about a terribly serious training plan. That sounds good to me for the moment, as I'm totally confused about what would be the right way to train. As a note, what would be good books to read to learn about training? I'm too broke to hire a coach.

    Karlo
     
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