Training tyres

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Bruce Dickson, Feb 13, 2003.

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  1. I'm after suggestions on good cheap tyres for training and club racing to save me trying them all
    myself. I have been using Hutchinson Excel 700x23 for a while which look like they should last for a
    long time while not being too slow. However I have had several of them fail due to a hole in the
    sidewall near the bead long before they would have died due to natural causes. Has anyone else who
    uses them had this problem or have I just been unlucky. What other tyres of similar weight (about
    330g) and price (US-$15 AUS-$30) have other people used which they would recommend. I would use
    lighter tyres if they were going to last as long and not cost much more but I don't see the point in
    paying twice as much for a tyre that will last half as long. I'd rather lose a race by 10mm because
    I had heavy tyres than 1 min because I got a flat. One thing I do like about the Excels is they
    don't have much tread and the centre is smooth. Other training tyres I have seem look like off-road
    tyres which I think would slow you down a lot more than the extra weight.

    Thanks in advance

    Bruce Dickson

    The bike should be light, simple, and reliable. Of course, reliability is infinitely more important
    than light weight, because there's nothing slower than a broken bike Adam Myerson 25/10/01 bike.com
     
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  2. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    I've been using Michelin's Hi Lite Prestige tires for the last few years. When Performance has them
    on sale for $20, I buy several. The only (knock on wood) problem with them I've had is picking up a
    metal screw a few weeks ago.

    My other favorite is the Conti Ultra 2000 with the natural rubber tread.

    Mike "Bruce Dickson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I'm after suggestions on good cheap tyres for training and club racing to save me trying them all
    > myself. I have been using Hutchinson Excel 700x23 for a while which look like they should last for
    > a long time while not being too slow. However I have had several of them fail due to a hole in the
    > sidewall near the bead long before they would have died due to natural causes. Has anyone else who
    > uses them had this problem or have I just been unlucky. What other tyres of similar weight (about
    > 330g) and price (US-$15 AUS-$30) have other people used which they would recommend. I would use
    > lighter tyres if they were going to last as long and not cost much more but I don't see the point
    > in paying twice as much for a tyre that will last half as long. I'd rather lose a race by 10mm
    > because I had heavy tyres than 1 min because I got a flat. One thing I do like about the Excels is
    > they don't have much tread and the centre is smooth. Other training tyres I have seem look like
    > off-road tyres which I think would slow you down a lot more than the extra weight.
    >
    > Thanks in advance
    >
    > Bruce Dickson
    >
    >
    > The bike should be light, simple, and reliable. Of course, reliability is infinitely more
    > important than light weight, because there's nothing slower than a broken bike Adam Myerson
    > 25/10/01 bike.com
     
  3. The best cheap tire I've ever bought is Vredestein Ricorso's from Nashbar, for $13. I usually have
    them on them on the back wheel since they usually are harder on tires, and put a more expensive tire
    on the front, like a Vredestein Tri-comp, or an expensive Conti. You can get them in 4 bright colors
    too. Minus's might be that it's a wire bead, and the tread wears a little faster than a tri-comp.
    But I think they get reasonable milage, and if you keep them pumped up (over 100 psi), quite good on
    flats. Best cheap tire in my book.
     
  4. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Bruce Dickson wrote:
    > I'm after suggestions on good cheap tyres for training and club racing to save me trying them
    > all myself.

    Why not use one set for training, and a better set for racing? It shouldn't be too much hassle to
    change, and the good ones should then last quite a long time.

    I normally use Vittoria Open Corsa 23's (which are far too good for me and would be excellent for
    your racing) but tonight, because I've run out of Vittorias, for the first time I bunged a Michelin
    Performer 25 on the rear (folding, actual weight: 305g, rated: 110psi but can take a bit more,
    182tpi, minimal tread patern, £10*). Not the truest (roundest) tyre I've ever seen but didn't notice
    any bumping on the road! Not as fast or supple as the Vittoria of course, but there was not
    _all_that_ much in it. Good for a cheapo tyre. Obviously I don't yet know how well it'll last but by
    the looks of it: ages! Strong sidewalls, so should be no trouble there. I reckon this type of 25c is
    better than a cheap 23 if the pressure is high enough. When at the same pressure, wider tyres
    actually have lower rolling resistance.

    Actually, if wear is a big concern but you don't want to compromise performance too much, maybe you
    could do what I've done - permanently for your training: use a nice lightweight racing tyre front,
    and a tough cheapo job at the back. Rear tyres always wear faster, and that's where you get most
    punctures too. Tyres don't have to match, do they? The only downside is the looks, and you can get
    over that.

    * from http://www.sjscycles.com/store/vIndex.htm (UK)

    BTW, Are you sure the Excells are 330g? I though they were lighter than that. Not 230g? (I suspect
    the Michelin Performer is thicker and heavier, but there has to be a price to pay for toughness &
    longetivity).

    ~PB
     
  5. Suzy Jackson

    Suzy Jackson Guest

    I race and train on Michelin Axial Carbons. I bought a bunch of them from biketiresdirect.com for
    US$25 each. Whilst that's a tad higher than your AUS$30 target, they really do last forever, and
    they're reasonably fast.

    Regards,

    Suzy

    --
    ---
    Suzy Jackson [email protected] http://www.suzyj.net
     
  6. Ronald

    Ronald Guest

    > I'm after suggestions on good cheap tyres for training and club racing to save me trying them
    > all myself.

    I have very good results with Continental Grand Prix S (same as GP only completely black). I tried
    Vittoria Open Corsa CX's before but had too many flats with those. After that i went to cheaper
    tyres like Vittoria Rubino's and Conti GP S's of which i like the Conti's best, they're more supple
    than the Rubino's. Both types don't flat easily. I get the GP's (steel wire) for euro 11.35 each so
    i change them before they wear to much and use them on the trainer after that. The Dutch magazine
    Fiets did a tyretest last year: http://bikepages.ultimade.nl/index.php4?page=tyretest&lang=en

    "Bruce Dickson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I'm after suggestions on good cheap tyres for training and club racing to save me trying them all
    > myself. I have been using Hutchinson Excel 700x23 for a while which look like they should last for
    > a long time while not being too slow. However I have had several of them fail due to a hole in the
    > sidewall near the bead long before they would have died due to natural causes. Has anyone else who
    > uses them had this problem or have I just been unlucky. What other tyres of similar weight (about
    > 330g) and price (US-$15 AUS-$30) have other people used which they would recommend. I would use
    > lighter tyres if they were going to last as long and not cost much more but I don't see the point
    > in paying twice as much for a tyre that will last half as long. I'd rather lose a race by 10mm
    > because I had heavy tyres than 1 min because I got a flat. One thing I do like about the Excels is
    > they don't have much tread and the centre is smooth. Other training tyres I have seem look like
    > off-road tyres which I think would slow you down a lot more than the extra weight.
    >
    > Thanks in advance
    >
    > Bruce Dickson
    >
    >
    > The bike should be light, simple, and reliable. Of course, reliability is infinitely more
    > important than light weight, because there's nothing slower than a broken bike Adam Myerson
    > 25/10/01 bike.com
     
  7. Tony Doman

    Tony Doman Guest

    [email protected] (Bruce Dickson) wrote

    I have been using Hutchinson Excel
    > 700x23 ...However I have had several of them fail due to a hole in the sidewall near the bead long
    > before they would have died due to natural causes. Has anyone else who uses them had this
    > problem or have I just been unlucky.

    Bruce,

    My experience with Excels:

    I have used Excels almost exclusively for the past four years or so (Kevlar and recently the Basic,
    which gives a slightly less harsh ride
    IMO). They do tend to develop a kind of crazing of the sidewalls and then the "tread" area seems to
    start separating. Often wispy fibres begin showing. I have seen similar effects on other
    people's bikes. As a result I tend to get rid of them before I really think I have got full
    value (IRO mileage) out of them.

    On the other hand, they are pretty tough on some dire surfaces -- our South African roads are
    generally very good, but not immune to cracking and potholing, particularly where cyclists are least
    likely to be punted off by speeding cars -- and have served me well in this respect. I think I
    recall just one pinch flat. They are less proof against penetration (thorn) punctures.

    Overall I think they make a good training tyre. What a difference, though, when I switch to
    Hutchinson Success for competitive riding (strictly with the rats and mice).
     
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