Training Week Ending February 1, 2004

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Swstudio, Jan 31, 2004.

  1. Swstudio

    Swstudio Guest

    Greetings, rec.runners! Please tell us about your training week and goals.

    cheers,
    --
    David (in Hamilton, ON) www.allfalldown.org
     
    Tags:


  2. Phil M.

    Phil M. Guest

    "SwStudio" <[email protected]> wrote in news:GvPSb.882$SY3.177225
    @read2.cgocable.net:

    > Greetings, rec.runners! Please tell us about your training week and goals.

    Sun - 10 Mon - rest Tue - 6 Wed - 8 Thu - 6 Fri - rest Sat - 4 Ttl - 34

    After last week's recovery week, this week was a good one. Sunday's 10- miler was during heavy
    rain, winds 15 - 20 MPH, temps in the low 30s. Apparently, none of my running apparel is suited for
    this combination of rain, wind, and temperature. My pants and gloves were soaked. My fingers were
    numb. After that run, I thought about getting some gear for this situation. However, this doesn't
    occur that often here in Atlanta, so maybe I'll just wait for some bargains. I'd appreciate any
    input on this.

    I've now achieved my weight goal of 175 (2 weeks ahead of schedule). I was 245 in June. According to
    Bob Glover's book, I should be in the 160s. I'm not sure if that is something I should be shooting
    for or not. Maybe I should have my body fat percentage checked before I try to lose more weight. The
    comments at work, such as "Phil, you're going to disappear," "Phil, you're shrinking away to
    nothing," "Phil, are you OK?" "Phil, are you still trying to lose?" "Phil, you're going to dry up
    and blow away." "Who are you and what did you do with Phil?" are becoming annoying, but I'm trying
    to smile. BTW, I work in a hospital and I talk to nurses all day long. It's amazing how many of them
    don't understand the concept of caloric deficit.

    I am seriously considering running the Chicago Marathon in June (it would be my 5th, but I haven't
    run one since '99). I have Pete Pfitzinger's book "Advanced Marathoning." In there they have
    several schedules, one of which looks like it might be suitable for me. It consists of a 24-week
    program that peaks at 55 MPW, 1 or 2 speed days per week, long runs up to 20 miles. Based on my
    current progress, I could easily start week 1 of the program within a month. However, April 25th
    would be 24 weeks away from Chicago's marathon date. So I could either maintain a holding pattern
    or keep progressing and increase the difficulty of the 24-week program. I'm leaning towards the
    former, since I don't want to increase my chances of injury and never make it to the starting
    line. Comments?

    -Phil
     
  3. Phil M.

    Phil M. Guest

  4. In article <[email protected]>, Phil M. wrote:
    > "SwStudio" <[email protected]> wrote in news:GvPSb.882$SY3.177225 @read2.cgocable.net:

    > After last week's recovery week, this week was a good one. Sunday's 10- miler was during heavy
    > rain, winds 15 - 20 MPH, temps in the low 30s. Apparently, none of my running apparel is suited
    > for this combination of rain, wind, and temperature. My pants and gloves were soaked. My fingers
    > were numb. After that run, I thought about getting some gear for this situation. However, this
    > doesn't occur that often here in Atlanta, so maybe I'll just wait for some bargains. I'd
    > appreciate any input on this.

    I've never worn "rainpants" and I don't think they're necessary. Your best bet for the rain is a
    pair of lightweight fitted tights. These don't absorb that much water, and because they stay close
    to your body, you don't get cold wet fabric slapping your legs. Of course they don't insulate a
    whole lot, but you don't need much insulation when it's that warm.

    As for tops: you can get always get shell jackets cheaply online.

    > I've now achieved my weight goal of 175 (2 weeks ahead of schedule). I was 245 in June. According
    > to Bob Glover's book, I should be in the 160s. I'm not sure if that is something I should be
    > shooting for or not.

    Bob Glover's numbers are guidelines for performance running. There is some individual variation.
    Some people may end up a little heavier, some may end up quite a bit lighter (e.g. David, the
    maintainer of this thread is very light)

    > Maybe I should have my body fat percentage checked before I try to lose more weight.

    Are you doing any other exercise besides running ? If you're lifting weights, this can potentially
    cause you to gain extra bulk which may push you a little over the "ideal" performance weight.
    Otherwise, the milage should bring your weight down.

    As far as body fat is concerned -- unless you have popup veins all over the place, you can afford to
    lose more.

    > The comments at work, such as "Phil, you're going to disappear," "Phil, you're shrinking away to
    > nothing," "Phil, are you OK?" "Phil, are you still trying to lose?" "Phil, you're going to dry up
    > and blow away." "Who are you and what did you do with Phil?" are becoming annoying, but I'm trying
    > to smile.

    Congratulations! When you get these sorts of comments, it means that you're doing something right!
    It sounds like you're handling it well.

    > I am seriously considering running the Chicago Marathon in June (it would be my 5th, but I haven't
    > run one since '99). I have Pete Pfitzinger's book "Advanced Marathoning." In there they have
    > several schedules, one of which looks like it might be suitable for me. It consists of a 24-week
    > program that peaks at 55 MPW, 1 or 2 speed days per week, long runs up to 20 miles. Based on my
    > current progress, I could easily start week 1 of the program within a month. However, April 25th
    > would be 24 weeks away from Chicago's marathon date. So I could either maintain a holding pattern
    > or keep progressing and increase the difficulty of the 24-week program. I'm leaning towards the
    > former, since I don't want to increase my chances of injury and never make it to the starting
    > line. Comments?

    You can't ramp up milage that much in a month. If your milage has been stable recently, you could
    add another 5mpw or so for this month. But I think your intuition that 1 month isn't long enough to
    take it up a level is correct.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  5. Phil M.

    Phil M. Guest

    Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > In article <[email protected]>, Phil M. wrote:
    >> "SwStudio" <[email protected].com> wrote in news:GvPSb.882$SY3.177225 @read2.cgocable.net:
    >
    >> After last week's recovery week, this week was a good one. Sunday's 10- miler was during heavy
    >> rain, winds 15 - 20 MPH, temps in the low 30s. Apparently, none of my running apparel is suited
    >> for this combination of rain, wind, and temperature. My pants and gloves were soaked. My fingers
    >> were numb. After that run, I thought about getting some gear for this situation. However, this
    >> doesn't occur that often here in Atlanta, so maybe I'll just wait for some bargains. I'd
    >> appreciate any input on this.
    >
    > I've never worn "rainpants" and I don't think they're necessary. Your best bet for the rain is a
    > pair of lightweight fitted tights. These don't absorb that much water, and because they stay close
    > to your body, you don't get cold wet fabric slapping your legs. Of course they don't insulate a
    > whole lot, but you don't need much insulation when it's that warm.
    >
    > As for tops: you can get always get shell jackets cheaply online.

    The jacket wasn't a problem, just my thighs and fingers. Maybe this summer I can pick up some "cold-
    wet" gear on sale. It doesn't happen often enough to warrant running out and buying stuff now.
    However, wet and just above freezing is a bitch to run in.

    >> I've now achieved my weight goal of 175 (2 weeks ahead of schedule). I was 245 in June. According
    >> to Bob Glover's book, I should be in the 160s. I'm not sure if that is something I should be
    >> shooting for or not.
    >
    > Bob Glover's numbers are guidelines for performance running. There is some individual variation.
    > Some people may end up a little heavier, some may end up quite a bit lighter (e.g. David, the
    > maintainer of this thread is very light).

    When I was in college in the early 80s, I was lifting weights. At that time I probably put on 20
    pounds of muscle. Of course that was 20 years ago, but I still have some added bulk in my upper
    body. This is really just bulk now, because it is not advantageous for distance running. So I can
    place myself in Glover's "Basic Competitor/Large Frame" category, which at 5'11" is 159 - 179.

    >> Maybe I should have my body fat percentage checked before I try to lose more weight.
    >
    > Are you doing any other exercise besides running ? If you're lifting weights, this can potentially
    > cause you to gain extra bulk which may push you a little over the "ideal" performance weight.
    > Otherwise, the milage should bring your weight down.
    >
    > As far as body fat is concerned -- unless you have popup veins all over the place, you can afford
    > to lose more.

    Not all over place, just one. But I get your drift. Does it matter if I can count my ribs. ;-)

    >> The comments at work, such as "Phil, you're going to disappear," "Phil, you're shrinking away to
    >> nothing," "Phil, are you OK?" "Phil, are you still trying to lose?" "Phil, you're going to dry up
    >> and blow away." "Who are you and what did you do with Phil?" are becoming annoying, but I'm
    >> trying to smile.
    >
    > Congratulations! When you get these sorts of comments, it means that you're doing something right!
    > It sounds like you're handling it well.

    Especially since I don't see everyone every day. I have to prepare myself for what they may say. I
    try to have fun with it.

    >> I am seriously considering running the Chicago Marathon in June (it would be my 5th, but I
    >> haven't run one since '99). I have Pete Pfitzinger's book "Advanced Marathoning." In there they
    >> have several schedules, one of which looks like it might be suitable for me. It consists of a 24-
    >> week program that peaks at 55 MPW, 1 or 2 speed days per week, long runs up to 20 miles. Based on
    >> my current progress, I could easily start week 1 of the program within a month. However, April
    >> 25th would be 24 weeks away from Chicago's marathon date. So I could either maintain a holding
    >> pattern or keep progressing and increase the difficulty of the 24-week program. I'm leaning
    >> towards the former, since I don't want to increase my chances of injury and never make it to the
    >> starting line. Comments?
    >
    > You can't ramp up milage that much in a month. If your milage has been stable recently, you could
    > add another 5mpw or so for this month. But I think your intuition that 1 month isn't long enough
    > to take it up a level is correct.

    The program wouldn't start until the end of April. I'm on pace now to surpass the starting point of
    that program. That's why I was thinking of holding it where I am. Maybe a little more mileage with
    occassional speed work.

    -Phil
     
  6. Phil M. <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> In article <X[email protected]>, Phil M. wrote:
    >>> "SwStudio" <[email protected]> wrote in news:GvPSb.882$SY3.177225 @read2.cgocable.net:
    >>
    >>> After last week's recovery week, this week was a good one. Sunday's 10- miler was during heavy
    >>> rain, winds 15 - 20 MPH, temps in the low 30s. Apparently, none of my running apparel is suited
    >>> for this combination of rain, wind, and temperature. My pants and gloves were soaked. My fingers
    >>> were numb. After that run, I thought about getting some gear for this situation. However, this
    >>> doesn't occur that often here in Atlanta, so maybe I'll just wait for some bargains. I'd
    >>> appreciate any input on this.
    >>
    >> I've never worn "rainpants" and I don't think they're necessary. Your best bet for the rain is a
    >> pair of lightweight fitted tights. These don't absorb that much water, and because they stay
    >> close to your body, you don't get cold wet fabric slapping your legs. Of course they don't
    >> insulate a whole lot, but you don't need much insulation when it's that warm.
    >>
    >> As for tops: you can get always get shell jackets cheaply online.
    >
    > The jacket wasn't a problem, just my thighs and fingers. Maybe this summer I can pick up some "cold-
    > wet" gear on sale. It doesn't happen often enough to warrant running out and buying stuff now.
    > However, wet and just above freezing is a bitch to run in.

    I use a pair of Patagonia water-resistant, windproof stretch shell pants that i'm in love with.
    They're extremely light and slightly reflective. I think patagonia discontinued them, but other
    manufacturers make similar things (you want the lightest weight stuff you can get that's slightly
    water resistant). They rock for new england winters; got in a great 14 today in 25 degrees with 13
    degree windchill wearing a pair of shorts and the light shell, and was really happy.

    -Dave

    --
    work: dga - at - lcs.mit.edu me: angio - at - pobox.com MIT Laboratory for Computer Science
    http://www.angio.net/ (note that my reply-to address is vaguely despammed...) bulk emailers: I do
    not accept unsolicited email. Do not mail me.
     
  7. Phil M.

    Phil M. Guest

    Dave Andersen <[email protected]> wrote in news:XLqdnak5Z9ZXLoHdRVn-
    [email protected]:

    >> The jacket wasn't a problem, just my thighs and fingers. Maybe this summer I can pick up some "cold-
    >> wet" gear on sale. It doesn't happen often enough to warrant running out and buying stuff now.
    >> However, wet and just above freezing is a bitch to run in.
    >
    > I use a pair of Patagonia water-resistant, windproof stretch shell pants that i'm in love with.
    > They're extremely light and slightly reflective. I think patagonia discontinued them, but other
    > manufacturers make similar things (you want the lightest weight stuff you can get that's
    > slightly water resistant). They rock for new england winters; got in a great 14 today in 25
    > degrees with 13 degree windchill wearing a pair of shorts and the light shell, and was really
    > happy.

    Thanks for the info. When rain is thrown into the equation, doesn't this change? I'm talking heavy
    rain, windy, in the low 30s running. Would those pants work for that? You are running in colder
    conditions but without the rain.

    -Phil
     
  8. Aw

    Aw Guest

    Came down with the flu almost 13 days ago, & it's really put me out of
    commission. My last long run was 20+ miles, & it was almost 30 sec/mile
    faster than my 4 mile run this morning. Yesterday, I swam what I thought
    would be an easy 3k workout. I felt like I was drowning. : (

    On the bright side, I've had a lot more time to read training material, and usenet posts! : )

    Flu Recovery Week (or two...hopefully not three)
    M: dnr - flu
    N: dnr - flu
    O: dnr - flu
    P: dnr - flu
    Q: dnr - flu
    R: dnr - flu
    S: dnr - 4.3 miles

    Total run: 4.3 miles (Swim 3k, Bike 0 miles)
     
  9. Goal: Connemarathon 28th March. A few 4-5 mile xc races in the meantime, and a 10mile or half
    marathon as well if I can find one nearby.

    Mon: 8 miles, 1 1/2 hour raquetball Tue: 8 miles, 1 hour raquetball Wed: dnr, 1 hour badminton
    Thurs: dnr, no time. Fri: 8 miles Sat: dnr, no time Sun: 10 miles

    Total: 34 miles. Finding it hard to make time for running these days. Roll on the long summer days.

    --
    Colm

    "SwStudio" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    : Greetings, rec.runners! Please tell us about your training week and goals.
     
  10. In article <[email protected]>, Phil M. wrote:
    > Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > The jacket wasn't a problem, just my thighs and fingers. Maybe this

    For fingers, you can get shell gloves or mitts.

    They do have shell pants for thighs, but if you haven't tried just using tights, you probably
    should. They do work quite well.

    >>> I've now achieved my weight goal of 175 (2 weeks ahead of schedule). I was 245 in June.
    >>> According to Bob Glover's book, I should be in the 160s. I'm not sure if that is something I
    >>> should be shooting for or not.
    >>
    >> Bob Glover's numbers are guidelines for performance running. There is some individual variation.
    >> Some people may end up a little heavier, some may end up quite a bit lighter (e.g. David, the
    >> maintainer of this thread is very light).
    >
    > When I was in college in the early 80s, I was lifting weights. At that time I probably put on 20
    > pounds of muscle. Of course that was 20 years ago, but I still have some added bulk in my upper
    > body. This is really just bulk now, because it is not advantageous for distance running. So I can
    > place myself in Glover's "Basic Competitor/Large Frame" category, which at 5'11" is 159 - 179.

    Judging by your self-description -- barely any veins, etc, I think you could probably drop another
    20lb or so. When I was losing weight, I remember being about 180lb,

    http://www.pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/weights/oct-02.jpg
    http://www.pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/weights/squats/squat03.jpg

    and at this weight I wasn't really fat, but not all that lean. Today, I'm 25lb lighter than I was in
    those photos (and still can lift comparable weights).

    Unless you can still lift the same weights that you could after your 20lb gain, I think most of the
    extra weight is non-lean and you can afford to lose it.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  11. Steve Common

    Steve Common Guest

    Goal : Sand Marathon April 2004

    Week ended 18/1 48km (30mi) Week ended 25/2 64km (40mi)

    This week was biggest ever training week since I started running. This was essentially due to
    getting lost (thanks Daniel!) during the "cool down" run on Sunday, after the regional cross country
    championships (we're through to National semi-finals). Instead of 50mins we ended up doing 1:50!

    Mon AM 1:15 14km 9mi Base endurance PM 0:55 9km 6mi Slow, office to home, with 7kg/16lb backpack

    Tue AM 0:50 9km 6mi Endurance, home to office, 8kg/18lb backpack PM 1:08 14km 9mi Base endurance

    Wed 1:00 12km 7mi Hills 300m/+30m

    Thu 0:58 11km 7mi Base endurance

    Fri 0:58 11km 7mi Base endurance

    Sat REST

    Sun 2:44 35km 22mi 20' up, 8.8k race in 34', 1:50 "down" :->
    _________________________
    Tot 9:55 114km 71miles
     
  12. Joe Positive

    Joe Positive Guest

    goals: either get over this ITB in time for the marathon (3 weeks
    away), or come to the decision to bail before I beat my legs up any
    more. Upcoming race, maybe: marathon Feb 22.

    M: 7mi, moderate but manageable pain
    N: 8mi, better
    O: 6mi incl 4x800, 7mpm pace - just checking
    P: 9mi, 90% pain-free
    Q: 9mi, some pain Sa: 8mi slow as dirt Su: 21.45mi, though not all at once (see below)

    total: 68.45 thoroughly pointless miles

    After a couple weeks of the "high 'n easy" plan (this refers to mileage) I really thought the ITB
    problem was fading away, and I began to have hope again that I might get to the marathon and run as
    decently as my training would allow.

    Today's long run put a big dent in that hope. After a really good 12 miles, I ran about a quarter-
    mile on the wrong side of a very crowned road, and by 13.1 miles I was toast - my knee had locked
    so that I couldn't bend it all without intense pain. I started walking back to my car, but after 10
    minutes I found I could run *very* slowly, so I ran 3 miles, feeling better and speeding up some as
    I went. After 10 minutes' rest, I ran another 2 miles, during which the knee locked again but not
    as severely - I could "run" (hobble) through it and get back to a fairly normal stride within 3 or
    4 minutes.

    All this foolishness got me almost 18.5 of the 21 miles I was supposed to run today, so after
    driving home I ran another 3 miles. The leg locked again before 2 miles, but 4 minutes of hobbling
    got me back to something like running.

    I have 70 miles (incl a 23-miler) scheduled for next week, and though I have no doubt I can run all
    that very very very slowly, I'm not sure I should try. I could learn how to use an elliptical
    trainer, or walk, or just take a day (or two) off, but there's an irrational fear that I will not
    make it through the marathon unless I run every single training mile. But there's also the
    increasingly real prospect of not making it to the marathon at all.

    Hope everyone's weeks went better.

    Karen
     
  13. Swstudio

    Swstudio Guest

    "SwStudio" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > Greetings, rec.runners! Please tell us about your training week and goals.

    My last week of mostly general aerobic stuff, now I enter a more structured program written out by
    my new coach (actually, this past weekend is the start of his training plan). I'm doing a 5k on
    Valentine's Day weekend, but I'm training right through it.

    Goals: ½ marathons (Feb. 29 & Mar. 7) ATB 30k (Mar 29) Mississauga Marathon (May 16)

    M - off T - 15km @ 4:05/km, 1km down W - 8km @ 4:00/km, weight training (run specific) T - off F -
    20km (first 15km @ 4:00/km, last 5km @ 3:43/km), 1km down S - 6km @ 4:08/km), weight training (run
    specific) S - treadmill: 4 x 2:00 @ 12mph ---> 3:00 @ 7mph 3km up, 3km down

    Total: 61km (38 miles)

    cheers,
    --
    David (in Hamilton, ON) www.allfalldown.org
     
  14. Johnny Bravo

    Johnny Bravo Guest

    On Sat, 31 Jan 2004 10:06:30 -0500, "SwStudio"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Greetings, rec.runners! Please tell us about your training week and goals.

    Did a few months of running last year and it kind of fell off to nothing as my running partner
    stopped running as well, just started again this week. Going to the gym with a friend and hitting
    the treadmill, 2 miles a day at a slow jog (4.5 mph) with a minute of walking (3.0 mph) every 6
    minutes. The pace for the 2 miles runs feels comfortable to me, I feel good when I finish and am
    fine for the run the next day.

    Did 3.1 miles today at an even slower pace (3.6 mph) and more walking every 4 minutes instead of
    every 6 as usual, my HR was at 82% of max at the end of each jog segment and 77% when I started up
    again. During the last 3/4 mile or so it was going up to 90% after the running sections as my usual
    time was 28-29 mins and was taking twice my usual workout time.

    While I'm still feeling good after my running, I get the impression from what I've read that this
    is probably too much to continue like this (15 miles a week). I intend to cut the running back to
    3 times per week (2, 2 and 3) for a couple of weeks before I start adding in the reccomended 10%
    per week and building up from there.

    I'd like to take a shot at a marathon eventually, hoping to run in
    the Disney one next January. I'm not looking to hurt myself, if my
    milage isn't up to it by then I will run the half-marathon instead.

    --
    "The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all
    its contents." - H.P. Lovecraft
     
  15. In article <[email protected]>, SwStudio wrote:
    > Greetings, rec.runners! Please tell us about your training week and goals.

    M 4.6/4.6 T 5.5 W 5 T 9 F 4.5/60min xtraining S 3.1/60min xtraining S 12

    Total 48 miles

    The 9 mile run was brutal -- a slug through snow up to 8 inches deep. Tough week -- had a cold and
    was struggling to get the miles in. The miles were harder and slower due to snow on the ground.
    Speed work begins next week ... but hopefully, some of the snow will go away. I'm done with January!

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  16. In article <[email protected]>, joe positive wrote:
    > goals: either get over this ITB in time for the marathon (3 weeks away), or come to the decision
    > to bail before I beat my legs up any more. Upcoming race, maybe: marathon Feb 22.
    >
    [snip]
    > I have 70 miles (incl a 23-miler) scheduled for next week, and though

    That seems unusual for a marathon program -- to do a very high milage (would that in fact be your
    peek milage ?) week and a long run in the last 3 weeks before the race (with the long run 2 weeks
    before). What program are you using ? Not that I know much about marathon training -- but it does
    from my naive viewpoint seem unusual.

    > I have no doubt I can run all that very very very slowly, I'm not sure I should try. I could learn
    > how to use an elliptical trainer, or walk, or just take a day (or two) off, but there's an
    > irrational fear that I will not make it through the marathon unless I run every single training
    > mile. But there's also the increasingly real prospect of not making it to the marathon at all.

    One question to ask yourself -- how much does what you do 3 weeks prior to a marathon matter anyway
    ? An observation I've made on my own training is that the benefits of training are often not
    realised till a month or so after that training. A hard month of training followed by a mediocre
    month which may be the result of injury, or "time constraints" (laziness ?) is often followed by a
    strong performance. On the other hand, it is often the case that performances immediately following
    a hard month (or several months) of training are often unimpressive. It seems that a lot of
    marathoners too buy into this notion that you can do more harm than good in the last weeks --
    because this is when marathon programs typically taper. In fact all programs that deal with peaking
    for a race tend to focus on doing as little harm as possible in the last month, and undertraining as
    much as possible, with a minimal amount of running economy work and base maintenance so as not to
    lose fitness.

    FWIW, I've had some very solid breakthrough performances that just followed training that was
    (somewhat) involuntarily reduced due to injury. It is likely given your injured state (and high
    milage weeks) that you are at least moderately overtrained, so I'd be very surprised if reducing
    milage between now and the big race actually hurt your performance. On the other hand, I'd be
    very surprised if running high milage on an injury within a few weeks of a big race did more good
    than harm.

    To summarise: why not taper ? It's the right time to do it, and you seem a tad worn down. If the
    taper helps you recover, it may turn out to be just what you need to run a good race. That, and try
    to stay optimistic.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  17. Swstudio

    Swstudio Guest

    "joe positive" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > goals: either get over this ITB in time for the marathon (3 weeks away), or come to the decision
    > to bail before I beat my legs up any more. Upcoming race, maybe: marathon Feb 22.

    Don't bail... you will do fine, just lay right off anything long or fast from now on and look at is
    as an extended taper.

    I was injured last year and ran a ½ marathon after no running at all for11 days. I ran a pretty
    good time, which was a victory considering the circumstances. I felt VERY fresh for the first 6 -7
    miles or so!

    cheers,
    --
    David (in Hamilton, ON) www.allfalldown.org
     
  18. Dot

    Dot Guest

    Phil M. wrote:

    >
    > Thanks for the info. When rain is thrown into the equation, doesn't this change? I'm talking heavy
    > rain, windy, in the low 30s running. Would those pants work for that? You are running in colder
    > conditions but without the rain.
    >

    Phil, Yes, cold (30s F, even into low 40s) and wet, esp. if windy, is very different from colder but
    dry. People can become hypothermic with temps in the 40s and sometimes 50s - if they lose ability to
    maintain heat = hypothermia. This can result from fatigue, loss of energy, dehydration, or too few
    layers. These things all interact.

    You'll need to figure out what works for you, depending on how long you'll be in it, but I bought my
    rain gear after a duathlon in 40s and rain (2+ hrs), but no wind. Of course, my race experience at
    the time consisted of a triathlon at +1F (about 1:30 of it outside), a pleasant weather trail race,
    and this duathlon. I could see the handwriting on the wall ;) But in my case, I was looking towards
    potentially being out in heavy continuous rain for multiple hours away from road system (hopefully
    only rarely, but wanted to be able to live to tell about it). A 30-60 min run from home I might not
    worry about it, but since I've got the gear I use it when appropriate to test it.

    Depending on race conditions, it's not unheard of for people to DNF because of hypothermia. In one
    case that I saw they needed to be rescued because they apparently couldn't move (low 30s, dry, but
    10-15 mph wind) and the rescue people couldn't get him warmed up on site. Yes, he was toward the
    front of the pack and lightly dressed. Of course, the winner was also toward the front of the pack
    and had no problems, but was probably more familiar with fueling and dealing with that kind of
    weather. You just need to figure what works for you, but the dangers of hypothermia should never be
    underestimated, esp. since it affects your ability to think.

    Dot

    --
    "Success is different things to different people" -Bernd Heinrich in Racing the Antelope
     
  19. Mark Mauro

    Mark Mauro Guest

    "SwStudio" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Greetings, rec.runners! Please tell us about your training week and goals.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > cheers,

    Goals: Build base for fall marathon, lose another 5 - 10 lbs

    Monday: 6mi Tuesday: 12mi Wednesday: off Thursday: 6mi Friday: 6mi Saturday: 6mi Sunday: 6mi
    Total: 42 miles

    Suddenly dropped :30 a mile this week without trying so I decided to weigh myself (it had been a
    week and a half), and I guess my plateau is over because I lost the last 10 lbs of my goal weight
    (180). Still think I should try to lose another 5 - 10 lbs, as I still feel a little heavy. Tweaked
    my hamstring a little on the Sunday run. I always seem to do this going uphill, and I thought
    hamstring injuries were a downhill thing. Any thoughts?

    Mark Mauro
     
  20. Goal: Start taper for Feb. 15 marathon.

    M: DNR
    N: 2.4 miles. Intended to run intervals (5 x 600m) but groin injury (adductor magnus) from last week
    too severe.
    O: DNR. Saw massage therapist. Th: DNR. Walked 4 miles.
    P: DNR. Walked 4 miles. Sa: 4 miles run/walk combo, 3 min/1 min. Tried 10K race in morning but DNF'd
    after quarter-mile. Su: 12 miles run/walk combo, 4 min/1min. Felt better as the workout went
    along. Will try all-running workout on Tuesday.

    --
    Brian P. Baresch Fort Worth, Texas, USA Professional editing and proofreading

    If you're going through hell, keep going. --Winston Churchill
     
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