Training Week Ending May 30, 2004

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Swstudio, May 30, 2004.

  1. M1ahearn

    M1ahearn Guest

    >> Greetings, rec.runners! Please tell us about your
    >> training week and goals.
    <<

    Mon - 2.5 miles, 21:05 Tue - DNR Wed - 4.3 miles, 41:27 Thu
    - DNR Fri - DNR Sat - DNR Sun - DNR

    Total - 6.8 miles

    Mike
     


  2. Gym Gravity

    Gym Gravity Guest

    m: 4.5mi, 38:33
    t: 5.5mi, very hilly, 49:10
    u: 4.6mi, hilly, 43:23
    v: dnr
    w: 8mi, hilly, 1:11:07
    x: dnr
    y: 5.55mi, 49:13

    28.2mi total, 4hrs11min.

    more of the same.
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>,
    SwStudio <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Greetings, rec.runners! Please tell us about your training
    >week and goals.

    Goals: Don't get more non-running illnesses or injuries Run
    3-4 times a week More distant: Finish a 10 miler on Labor
    Day Race 8k cross-country in early November Race 10 miles in
    state RRCA challenge

    Sun: 45 minutes run/walk. Walking induced by skyrocketing
    heart rate (175 and climbing) in high humidity, high heat
    day. But I did manage to get to almost 3 miles before that
    set in. Mon: off Tue: 1600m warm up
    10:30 of 30 seconds flat out, 35 seconds recover 400m
    cool down -- The 35 seconds recover is to make up for
    the fact that I start on the bell, but it takes me a
    few seconds to slow down from flat out speed. -- This
    is not an easy workout (no surprise). -- I'll second
    Sam's comment (not that I thought he was wrong) that
    this is a VO2max type workout. The first one or two
    flat out stretches were heavily anaerobic, but that
    didn't last much longer. -- My recover was a moderate
    walk (probably about 4 mph) rather than slow walking
    or standing. Sam, or anyone else knowledgeable about
    these, what's the proper recovery activity? Wed: off
    Thu: DNR Fri: off Sat: 30 minutes with beginners --
    something like 100 minutes on the week.

    Sun: 55 minutes run/walk. This time, the walking was a
    controlled matter of racewalking as I gave directions to
    newcomers to our Sunday long runs. Heat and humidity weren't
    up, so I managed, as desired, to keep the pulse mostly under
    160 (75% HRR).

    Second consecutive week with 3 running days. Not a lot of
    running, and days not arranged as I'd like, but finally
    I've done 2 weeks of 3 days each and not brought down the
    wrath of stomach viruses, or been attacked by boxes in the
    house, or any of the other sillinesses that have been
    assaulting me this year.

    --
    Robert Grumbine http://www.radix.net/~bobg/ Science faqs and
    amateur activities notes and links. Sagredo (Galileo
    Galilei) "You present these recondite matters with too much
    evidence and ease; this great facility makes them less
    appreciated than they would be had they been presented in a
    more abstruse manner." Two New Sciences
     
  4. Mark

    Mark Guest

    Training week and goals...

    Monday: 5 miles easy Tuesday: DNR Wednesday: 8 miles -
    6x3:30 w/ 1:00 recovery; 3x7:00 w/ 1:30 recovery Thursday: 8
    miles Friday: 5 miles Saturday: DNR Sunday: Mad City 10 K +
    3 mile cool down/run to car.

    Weekly Total: 35 miles - Tough Wednesday run but I was
    feeling good by the weekend. I had a good race. I will post
    a race report later today. I still want to move up to about
    6 runs per week and increase my weekly mileage. Knees hurt
    slightly. Two weeks until my next race.

    Mark

    http://running.krisandmark.com/
     
  5. Phil M.

    Phil M. Guest

    joe positive <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > goals: continue building base as I start training for fall
    > marathon; work on speed with weekly track workouts and the
    > occasional short race; learn (again) how to survive
    > running in 80F/80% RH. Upcoming races: 5000m track race
    > June 9; 5K June 25; marathon Oct 10.
    >
    > M: 9.75mi (9:13)
    > T: 9.75mi (8:30)
    > W: 8mi incl 8x400 @ 1:27 (avg)
    > R: 10:5mi (8:49)
    > F: 6.5mi (8:33) incl 10 x strides Sa: 9.3mi incl 5K race
    > (19:42, 5th female, 1F40) Su: 17.25mi (7:51)
    >
    > total: 71.05 miles
    >
    > The 5K race was not on a certified course, so I won't
    > count it as a real PR, won't look up the WAVA %, won't
    > give any Dean screams about
    > it. But last year I ran this race in 24:23, so I'm pretty
    > happy with yesterday's result.

    First in your AG?! Awesome! Can I do the scream for ya?

    Yeeeeeeeearrrrrrhhhhh!

    I've got it down pretty good (much to the dismay of my
    family). Was your speed work and mileage anywhere near what
    it is this year? Just looking at your 8 x 400m @ 1:27 would
    indicate a sub 20 5k.

    > Florida summer fun: next race is a 5000m track race our
    > coach has scheduled in lieu of our regular weekly track
    > workout. It'll be run at about 5PM in full sun, over 85F
    > (or the aftermath of a thunderstorm) and god knows how
    > much humidity. I've never puked after a race, but this
    > might be my initiation into that club.

    Ever read "Running With the Legends?" There is a chapter in
    the book about Steve Jones. One of his "trademarks" was
    pushing himself to the extent that he would vomit. He says,
    "If I'm still standing at the end of the race, hit me with a
    board and knock me down. Because that means I didn't run
    hard enough."

    Phil M.

    --
    "I gotta go. You're killin' me."
     
  6. Dan Stumpus

    Dan Stumpus Guest

    "Brian Wakem" <[email protected]> wrote

    > Saturday: pm) 5 miles in total, 8 x 400m (track) w/2min -
    > hard (69, 66, 66, 67, 65, 65, 66, 65)

    > Total run: 46.5 miles

    That's a great 400m workout, especially considering the
    short jog. If you base is good, that's a good omen.

    Re your 15:59 goal:

    (Shield your eyes, Doug!) your 3 x 1 mile with full recovery
    will be very close to your 5k predicted pace, e.g., If you
    can run 5:10 or better for the 3, you'll be ready. I'm sure
    you know that an equivalent 10k is about
    33:30.
     
  7. Tony

    Tony Guest

    Tony wrote in message ...
    >.... My long runs or bikes aren't done religiously every
    >weekend, but every 10 days to 2 weeks or so. 3:20 bike Sat
    >before, and long run planned for sunday...

    Ok did the long run today: 4:02, about 16.5 miles, 80% hilly
    singletrack trails, about 2700' climb, HR 145. On roads this
    effort would have taken me about 20 to 21 miles. Heart rate
    too high and a challenge to keep it low; walked several
    times to let HR settle and to try to clear the acidity out
    of my legs, and walked all the steep uphills. Feel pretty
    good after, legs feel worked but not too sore.

    Question for those reading this: how tired are you all after
    your long runs? I think I always do too much muscle damage
    on my long trail runs even if I walk the uphills and try to
    keep my effort low. The point of long runs as I understand
    it is to train the body to endure long efforts. I know if I
    go too hard any training effect will be washed away by
    muscle and system damage. Do any of you think about this
    question: what is the optimal distance and effort level at a
    point in time that will most effectively improve my ability
    to do long runs?

    Today I felt great for the first 2 hours. At 2:30 I felt a
    bit of heaviness building in my legs, which slowly
    increased until I finished at 4 hours. From past experience
    running in 6 hour and 8 hour ROGAINEs and 50 miles, I know
    this heaviness continues to increase until my legs are
    stiff, hard, and very "heavy". I assume this is accumulated
    acidity and muscle damage and I think at some point the
    training effect becomes null when the damage level gets
    high. I guess this means my pace is too high for my
    physiology when going that long. So at what point does the
    run become useless damage?

    - Tony
     
  8. Onemarathon

    Onemarathon Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "SwStudio" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "SwStudio" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > Greetings, rec.runners! Please tell us about your
    > > training week and goals.
    >
    > Low mileage week as I ease through injury.
    >
    >
    > M 45 min recumbant, weights T 45 min stationary bike w/
    > some out of saddle intervals last 15 min W 3min (11mph)
    > --->2min (8mph) x 6, 3km up, 3km down T (2min @ 1%
    > incline, 4% incline, 8% incline all @ 8mph) x 5 3km up ,
    > 3km down F 1km easy (forgot patellar strap) S 16km easy S
    > 2 min (12mph) --->3 min (7mph) x 6, 3km up, 1km down
    >
    > Total: 52km
    >
    >
    > cheers,

    hope you're keeping your sanity with the reduced mileage,
    David. looks like you've found some alternatives with the
    wts and bike.

    how is the knee feeling.... better?

    Cam
     
  9. On 2004-05-30, WestEndGirl <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Upcoming races still same as last week...Corporate
    > Challenge 6/9, New York Mini 6/12 Just joined one of the
    > local running clubs this week, I think it will be a

    Which one ?

    > Rant of the week: The race day info for the Corporate
    > Challenge is available, and their definition of a "racer"
    > is 8 min/mile or less, and anything slower is "non-
    > competitive," and they advise those peeps to line up with
    > the slower runners and walkers.

    Bah! Reminds me of an article(joggers world, I think) that
    had the nerve to suggest that unless you're an elite
    athlete, it's "rude" to fly past others at the finish line.
    Screw that -- the mid-packers have every right to be
    "competitive" as anyone else.

    In my case, if the guy in front of me is from a rival club
    in a team-pointer, or if it's a smaller race and he's age
    30-39, I'm gonna leave him in the dust if I can, and if he
    wants the trophy more badly than I do, he's going to have to
    fight me for it -- all the way to the finish line.

    Using absolute time alone is silly anyway -- senior
    masters women who can hold an 8:20 pace can win trophies
    at these races.

    > Now, I plan to do this at approximately
    > 8:20-8:30/mile-which I personally think is still pretty
    > damn competitive. I'm not gonna be uber-fast, but on the
    > same token, I do NOT want to be pushing walkers out of
    > the way for the first mile. (Especially since this event
    > is huge-probably over 10,000 people.) You know, I've
    > always been respectful when it comes to positioning
    > myself for the start, but I think this is one time when
    > I am gonna have to bend the rules. And it's

    Part of me says bend 'em, but part of me also says "don't
    count on this race for a PR".

    > interesting that other cities have 9 min/mile as the
    > cutoff between "competitive" and "non-competitive."

    Personally, I think any such designation amounts to
    partitioning into "cattle" and "non-cattle", so I'm not a
    big fan of it.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  10. Capt Stabbem

    Capt Stabbem Guest

  11. >Greetings, rec.runners! Please tell us about your training
    >week and goals.

    Goals: Steamboat Springs Marathon June 6th (next
    Sunday,eeek!)
    After that, a good rest, then slowly rebuild and prepare
    for the Tucson racing season which starts in September.

    Mon - Rest Day Tue - 5.45 mi @ 8:43 Pace Wed - 5.45 mi @
    9:24 pace Thu - 5.45 mi @ 8:52 pace Fri - Rest Day Sat -
    Worked on my final exam, first part due at 5pm.... Sun - 7.5
    mi @ 8:48 pace. Sabino Canyon. Felt just SUPER, ran 10
    seconds slower than my fastest ever for Sabino and I wasn't
    trying to. Ran one of my fastest times up the canyon ever.
    So I feel good about my conditioning level for the marathon.
    NOw to work on final part 2, with a clear head! Total: 23.85
    (Love that Taper!)

    Teresa in AZ
     
  12. Red Dot

    Red Dot Guest

    >Goals:
    >
    > 5/31/04 - Celebrate America 10K. My first race in over 4
    > years. Goal <43:00, 68% WAVA

    How did you do? I came in 15th- 41:38. Now I'm waiting for
    the Peachtree RR.
     
  13. Tim Downie

    Tim Downie Guest

    joe positive wrote:
    > goals: continue building base as I start training for fall
    > marathon; work on speed with weekly track workouts and the
    > occasional short race; learn (again) how to survive
    > running in 80F/80% RH. Upcoming races: 5000m track race
    > June 9; 5K June 25; marathon Oct 10.
    >
    > M: 9.75mi (9:13)
    > T: 9.75mi (8:30)
    > W: 8mi incl 8x400 @ 1:27 (avg)
    > R: 10:5mi (8:49)
    > F: 6.5mi (8:33) incl 10 x strides Sa: 9.3mi incl 5K race
    > (19:42, 5th female, 1F40) Su: 17.25mi (7:51)
    >
    > total: 71.05 miles
    >
    > The 5K race was not on a certified course, so I won't
    > count it as a real PR, won't look up the WAVA %, won't
    > give any Dean screams about
    > it. But last year I ran this race in 24:23, so I'm pretty
    > happy with yesterday's result.

    That's a fantastic improvement Karen and well deserved given
    the effort you're putting in. I can't say that my male ego
    hasn't suffered (my PB's still 19:50) but it's 5K night
    again tomorrow so I'll be trying my damnedest. ;-)

    Just out of interest, if you're running 70 miles a week
    now, what sort of ball park figure have you in mind for
    your marathon?

    Tim

    --
    Remove the obvious to reply by email.
     
  14. Becca

    Becca Guest

    [email protected] (M1ahearn) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > >> Greetings, rec.runners! Please tell us about your
    > >> training week and goals.
    > <<
    >
    M-Su - DNR Su - 2.5 hrs. ultimate

    Rested my knee all week. Burned out last week after a very
    bad day of play on Sunday. Played great on Sunday and had
    the speed back. Felt very little loss of training.

    So back to 3/3/5 but now I'm not going to neglect speed
    work. Ultimate just requires it. I'm thinking about suicides
    in cleats on the grass.

    ~b
     
  15. Tony

    Tony Guest

    Doug Freese wrote in message ...
    >
    >"Tony" <[email protected](remove)hotmail.com> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> 70 mile trail ultra in 2006 (Laurel Highlands)
    >
    >I'm doing it this year. Oh shit, that's in two weeks I
    >better get training. ;)
    >
    >
    >> 100? mile trail ultra in 2007 (Mohican 100 in ohio)? -
    >> Unknown
    >territory
    >
    >Unless you don't like or can't afford to travel think about
    >the Vermont 100 and pass up the hordes of the Ohio flies.

    Actually vermont is closer and thanks for the tip. I was
    thinking the ohio one would be easier for my first 100m, but
    I'll look more closely at VT now. Flies suck...

    Oh and goodluck at Laurel Highlands it looks like a great
    race. lol I'll check out your progress on the website...

    >
    >>The main thing I learned from running 50m on trail before
    >>is that the legs have to
    >really
    >> be used to the pounding, especially steep downhills
    >> found on
    >trails.
    >
    >No truer words spoken. I will add one other tidbit, train
    >your hiking muscles for the uphills. Running and hiking the
    >ups are two different animals.
    >
    >
    >> 100m is said to be 3x harder than 50m
    >
    >Interesting perspective. Other than the obvious twice
    >the distance I never thought about the difference
    >between the two. What I do know is the last 20 miles of
    >a 100 take forever.
    >
    >
    >> so I know I have a long way to go and I plan to take my
    >> time getting there.
    >
    >Great Strategy.
    >
    >-DougF
     
  16. Dan Stumpus

    Dan Stumpus Guest

    "Tony" <[email protected](remove)hotmail.com> wrote

    > Ok did the long run today: 4:02, about 16.5 miles, 80%
    > hilly singletrack trails, about 2700' climb, HR 145. On
    > roads this effort would have taken
    me
    > about 20 to 21 miles. Heart rate too high and a challenge
    > to keep it low; walked several times to let HR settle and
    > to try to clear the acidity out
    of
    > my legs, and walked all the steep uphills. Feel pretty
    > good after, legs feel worked but not too sore.

    Sounds good. My guide on long runs is to avoid the leg burn
    on uphills longer than a few feet. If I can't jog slowly
    enough on a hill to avoid the burn, I walk. Leg burn vastly
    increases the rate of glycogen consumption. You can run
    through the burn on an 8 - 12 miler, but you'll pay the
    piper on a 20+ miler.

    Besides, if you're going to do ultras you need to learn to
    walk fast up steep hills; it's much more efficient than
    running, easier on the body, and rests the running muscles.
    So view the fast walking up hills as a necessary part of
    your training.

    If you're not used to something (like running 5 miles
    downhill after 4 hours of running), you'll get soreness at
    first. This is good -- you'll be stronger after it heals,
    provided you take it easy.

    > Question for those reading this: how tired are you all
    > after your long runs? I think I always do too much muscle
    > damage on my long trail runs
    even
    > if I walk the uphills and try to keep my effort low. The
    > point of long
    runs
    > as I understand it is to train the body to endure long
    > efforts. I know if
    I
    > go too hard any training effect will be washed away by
    > muscle and system damage. Do any of you think about this
    > question: what is the optimal distance and effort level at
    > a point in time that will most effectively improve my
    > ability to do long runs?

    The effort level should be such that you can still run up
    moderate hills at the end of your run without loading up.
    This means that you haven't used up your glycogen. When you
    get close to empty, the slightest hill causes leg burn.
    This means you paced it too fast. If you can still run
    smoothly without straining at end of your long run, you've
    paced it right.

    I run hard on shorter runs and repeat days, and on the day
    of the race, but not on my long runs (ok, sometimes I push
    it on the last 10-20 minutes of my last climb). As you have
    surmised, when done too hard, the long run becomes
    destructive.

    The bigger your base (average mileage in last 6 weeks), the
    easier the long runs are. The more you do long runs (say,
    weekly), the better you'll get, provided you recover
    adequately. This is for racers, but if you gradually
    introduce speed/repeats, your long runs will also get easier
    and faster.

    My base is about 75-80 mpw, and my weekly run is usually a
    20 mile out and back to the top of Mt. Wilson in L.A. It's
    about a 5000' climb. When I'm in speed shape, I run the
    uphill at a 155 pulse, getting to 170 at the top, in a bit
    over 2 hours. The downhill takes about 1:15 at a pulse of
    120-135, and I end the run knowing I could go another
    several miles without any problem.

    I am not interested in doing much the rest of the day,
    though! Maybe some light puttering, but not wrestling with
    the lawn mower...

    > Today I felt great for the first 2 hours. At 2:30 I felt
    > a bit of
    heaviness
    > building in my legs, which slowly increased until I
    > finished at 4 hours. From past experience running in 6
    > hour and 8 hour ROGAINEs and 50 miles, I know this
    > heaviness continues to increase until my legs are
    > stiff, hard,
    and
    > very "heavy". I assume this is accumulated acidity and
    > muscle damage and
    I
    > think at some point the training effect becomes null when
    > the damage level gets high.

    If you pace falls and your legs get heavy, my guess is that
    you ran out of gas (glycogen) -- meaning you went out too
    fast and/or aren't getting enough water/sports-drink. I
    consume 200-300 calories per hour of Cytomax or Accelerade.

    Ideally, you should end the run tired, but able to
    maintain pace without straining and have no muscle
    soreness the next day.

    > I guess this means my pace is too high for my physiology
    > when going that long. So at what point does the run become
    > useless damage?

    If I'm not raring to run two days later, I consider it run
    too hard. Some of my ultra buddies will bash themself enough
    so that they need three days to recover, but that's too rich
    for my taste.

    Keep at it and you'll improve -- the first one is the
    hardest.

    -- Dan
     
  17. On 2004-05-31, Tony <[email protected]> wrote:

    Note that I'm a middle-distance guy, so my answer isn't
    going to have much applicability to your training -- but
    maybe it will be of some interest to others.

    > Tony wrote in message ...
    >>.... My long runs or bikes aren't done religiously every
    >>weekend, but every 10 days to 2 weeks or so. 3:20 bike Sat
    >>before, and long run planned for sunday...
    >
    > Ok did the long run today: 4:02, about 16.5 miles, 80%
    > hilly singletrack trails, about 2700' climb, HR 145. On
    > roads this effort would have taken me about 20 to 21
    > miles. Heart rate too high and a challenge to keep it low;
    > walked several times to let HR settle and to try to clear
    > the acidity out of my legs, and walked all the steep
    > uphills. Feel pretty good after, legs feel worked but not
    > too sore.
    >
    > Question for those reading this: how tired are you all
    > after your long runs?

    Pretty tired, but still nowehere near as tired as I am after
    racing (even racing a 5k). My long runs are as fast as my
    shorter runs, and I do them on slightly more difficult
    terrain -- basically road hills. These hills aren't extreme,
    the longest climb is just shy of 100ft. Just a gentle
    pounding, I suppose. I think you said somewhere that you
    think it's important to prepare your legs for the pounding
    one takes in long distance races. Even though I'm just
    preparing for a half or 10k, I like to have the extra
    toughening up one gets out of a slightly challenging course.

    > I think I always do too much muscle damage on my long
    > trail runs even if I walk the uphills and try to keep my
    > effort low. The point of long runs as I understand it is
    > to train the body to endure long efforts. I know if I go
    > too hard any training effect will be washed away by muscle
    > and system damage. Do any of you think about this
    > question: what is the optimal distance and effort level at
    > a point in time that will most effectively improve my
    > ability to do long runs?

    This is the part where we will inevitably diverge, because
    optimal distance and effort level depend on ones goal races.
    The miler might be happy to make the long run an easy day.
    For the marathon or ultra runner, it may be the most
    important piece of quality training in the schedule.

    As a middle distance guy, I put it somewhere between these.
    I'd never push it over 2 hours or over 25% weekly milage. I
    have no need to train myself to deal with bonk or
    dehydration, because these are not major issues in my races.

    Muscle damage is also an issue -- if I feel able to take
    more muscle damage, I'd rather take on more challenging
    terrain or slightly increase training intensity.

    > Today I felt great for the first 2 hours. At 2:30 I felt a
    > bit of heaviness building in my legs, which slowly
    > increased until I finished at 4 hours. From past
    > experience running in 6 hour and 8 hour ROGAINEs and 50
    > miles, I know this heaviness continues to increase until
    > my legs are stiff, hard, and very "heavy". I assume this
    > is accumulated acidity and muscle damage and I

    Probably the latter. I'm pretty familiar with lactic acid
    and the long run sensation is different -- it's more like a
    slow tearing of the muscles, which causes increasing
    stiffness. At the end of my 15 miler (about 1:45-1:55), it's
    not too bad, but I imagine it would probably hurt like hell
    were I to continue for another 5 miles or so.

    > think at some point the training effect becomes null when
    > the damage level gets high. I guess this means my pace is
    > too high for my physiology when going that long. So at
    > what point does the run become useless damage?

    For me, anything over 2 hours. The long run is on roughly
    equal footing with overall training volume, and plays second
    fiddle to speed work. It is performed at the same intensity
    one would use for a 5 mile training run -- slower than
    marathon pace, but not much slower. Obviously this is
    different for ultra runners.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  18. Westendgirl

    Westendgirl Guest

    > > Upcoming races still same as last week...Corporate
    > > Challenge 6/9, New
    York
    > > Mini 6/12 Just joined one of the local running clubs
    > > this week, I think it will be
    a
    >
    > Which one ?
    >
    I joined the Flyers-so far so good...they're good people.
    And it's kinda nice being part of a "team" but still being
    able to keep it an individual sport-best of both worlds.

    > > Now, I plan to do this at approximately
    > > 8:20-8:30/mile-which I personally think is still pretty
    > > damn
    competitive.
    > > I'm not gonna be uber-fast, but on the same token, I do
    > > NOT want to be pushing walkers out of the way for the
    > > first mile. (Especially since
    this
    > > event is huge-probably over 10,000 people.) You know,
    > > I've always been respectful when it comes to positioning
    > > myself for the start, but I
    think
    > > this is one time when I am gonna have to bend the rules.
    > > And it's
    >
    > Part of me says bend 'em, but part of me also says "don't
    > count on this
    race
    > for a PR".
    >
    I'm not counting on this race for a PR either (well I know I
    will 'unofficially' PR compared to my clock time of 36 and
    change last year, and hopefully this year it will not rain!)
    I'm looking forward to this race for 2 reasons: One, this
    has a little bit of sentimental value for me as last year
    this was my first race ever, some co-workers were impressed
    at my performance-and my boss even recommended that I do
    more of these races, so you can say it 'inspired' me a
    little. So it's sorta like coming full circle for me. And
    also, the "family challenge" between me and my bro is stil
    aaawwwwwnnnnn :)...the latest reports from the home front is
    that he "trained" for 1 or 2 days and then gave up. So maybe
    he won't be running 7 mpm (The fam is rooting for me to win
    just to take his cocky a$$ down a peg...teehee)-but I'm
    still not gonna go too hard, keeping the Mini in the back of
    my mind. -Lara
    :)
     
  19. Joe Positive

    Joe Positive Guest

    On Sun, 30 May 2004 17:43:38 GMT, "Phil M." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >First in your AG?! Awesome! Can I do the scream for ya?
    >
    >Yeeeeeeeearrrrrrhhhhh!

    Thanks, though the 5K gods may be angered by a scream for a
    PR on an uncertified-course. If so, we must find a way to
    placate them.

    >I've got it down pretty good (much to the dismay of my
    >family). Was your speed work and mileage anywhere near what
    >it is this year?

    Nope, not hardly. I think I was running 35 - 40 mpw then,
    with speedwork every other week. To be honest, though, my
    race last year wasn't totally representative of anything;
    I'd recently run 5K about 40s faster, and at this particular
    race last year I happened to be having a bad day. Also to be
    honest: about 6 weeks after that race I saw my first big where-did-THAT-come-
    from improvement since joining a track club 5 months before.

    >Ever read "Running With the Legends?" There is a chapter in
    >the book about Steve Jones. One of his "trademarks" was
    >pushing himself to the extent that he would vomit. He says,
    >"If I'm still standing at the end of the race, hit me with
    >a board and knock me down. Because that means I didn't run
    >hard enough."

    Great, this 5000m race is looking better and better :)

    See you in Chicago,

    Karen
     
  20. Phil M.

    Phil M. Guest

    Red Dot <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    >
    >>
    >>Goals:
    >>
    >> 5/31/04 - Celebrate America 10K. My first race in over 4
    >> years. Goal <43:00, 68% WAVA
    >
    >
    > How did you do? I came in 15th- 41:38. Now I'm waiting for
    > the Peachtree RR.

    Check out "Race Report: Celebrate America 5k/10k" for all
    the gory details. I must have been about 45 seconds behind
    you. What age group were you in?

    Phil M.

    --
    "I gotta go. You're killin' me."
     
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