Training with Cadence

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by biserker1, Feb 26, 2011.

  1. biserker1

    biserker1 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2011
    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    0
    I really wanted to train hard this off-season. I purchased a few training DVD's from the sufferfest, carmichael training, etc. I have a question regarding cadence. The cadence recommendations are generally between 90 - 100. Two dvd's focus on intervals and the third on climbing.

    I can hit the cadence recommendations in the easiest gears. If i go to a bigger gear i have a hard time breaking 100 and sustaining it. Should i stay in the easiest gear and work my way to a bigger gear? Or do i lower the cadence to push a bigger gear?

    thanks.
     
    Tags:


  2. bgoetz

    bgoetz Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2010
    Messages:
    816
    Likes Received:
    20
    My opinion is that if you are going to focus on a training method you should stick with it. However, as a general training method, and as someone who typically rides with a lower cadence I do not focus on cadence. Most of my trainer time is spent at <90 rpm, I just ride where I feel like I can put out as much power and sustain it for the time that I need to in order to complete the interval. If I want to work on cadence I ride the rollers, which really helps my form and in my opinion helps me establish a functional higher cadence, in that if I get sloppy with my pedal stroke I get sloppy on the rollers.

    I hear a ton of talk regarding cadence, and how higher is better. Honestly I don't focus to much on it because I never have any issues jumping hard when I need to or climbing, so my thought is that if it is not broke then why try to fix it. I see to many people spinning their a$$ of getting popped off of the back because they are so focus on maintaining a higher cadence, to me it is all feel.
     
  3. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2008
    Messages:
    10,057
    Likes Received:
    185
    You're over thinking it.

    If you want to do 90 to 100 rpm for a given effort or interval, you just use whatever gear will allow you to ride at that cadence for the time required. Nothing more, nothing less.

    So, for a 2 minute spuds out effort, you might be in the 13 sprocket at ~95rpm or for something that's 60 minutes long you might be in the 16 sprocket. Adjust the effort to make the interval just about sustainable at the rpm desired.
     
  4. biserker1

    biserker1 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2011
    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for your replies. My average cadence has gone up significantly over the off-season (70 - 82). The intervals have been really helping. Hopefully i can get outside in the next few weeks and ride some climbs that gave me trouble last season.
     
  5. An old Guy

    An old Guy Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2011
    Messages:
    1,380
    Likes Received:
    21
    For the most part cadence on climbs is determined by the lowest gear you have and your power output. (On a short 15% grade in my 34/27 I have enough power to get my cadence up in the mid 50's. On long - 10 mile, 7% climbs I still have a low cadence because of my lack of power for the duration.)

    Build up your power. And use the cadence that feels best to you.
     
Loading...
Loading...