trans fat question

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Slowhand, Apr 5, 2005.

  1. Slowhand

    Slowhand Guest

    Hi all,

    I have a newbie question for you (I am an economist,
    and have nothing more than a novice's knowledge of
    basic nutrition, so apologies for my ignorance!). I am
    hoping one of you gurus can help me out.

    I am working with a database from a dietary survey.
    It lists grams of food consumed by individuals and
    for each food item, and also provides the total fat content
    per gram of the food, total saturated fat content,
    total mono and poly unsaturated fat content, etc.

    Problem is, it does not provide direct information on
    trans fat content per gram of the food, and I am
    interested in knowing this. Would it make
    sense for me to infer the trans fat content as:
    total fat - (saturated fat + monounsaturated +
    polyunsaturated)? Or is there some complication
    that blows this out of the water?

    I would much appreciate any insights.

    Thanks in advance.
     
    Tags:


  2. Yibbels

    Yibbels Guest

  3. montygram

    montygram Guest

    Consider this: if it were not for processed food, "trans fat" would
    not be an issue. CLA is a trans fat produced by many animals and is
    sold as a health supplement, yet chemically speaking, it is undeniably
    a "trans fat." It's a worthless topic unless terms and phrases are
    defined with scientific pre
     
  4. Juhana Harju

    Juhana Harju Guest

    montygram wrote:
    :: Consider this: if it were not for processed food, "trans fat" would
    :: not be an issue. CLA is a trans fat produced by many animals and is
    :: sold as a health supplement, yet chemically speaking, it is
    :: undeniably a "trans fat." It's a worthless topic unless terms and
    :: phrases are defined with scientific pre

    Actually studies have found mixed results about the health effects of CLA.
    Some of them are posivite, some negative from the point of health.

    --
    Juhana
     
  5. MMu

    MMu Guest

    > interested in knowing this. Would it make
    > sense for me to infer the trans fat content as:
    > total fat - (saturated fat + monounsaturated +
    > polyunsaturated)? Or is there some complication
    > that blows this out of the water?
    >
    > I would much appreciate any insights.


    It won't work like this.
    "Total Fat" contains more than just triglycerides, thus, if you substract
    saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (trans fats are
    containing either monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fatty acids with a
    trans configuration, so they might be in there already) the rest will not be
    trans fats but, very probably mostly other fat soluable food components.
     
  6. MMu

    MMu Guest

    > Consider this: if it were not for processed food, "trans fat" would
    > not be an issue. CLA is a trans fat produced by many animals and is
    > sold as a health supplement, yet chemically speaking, it is undeniably
    > a "trans fat."


    As the name already says: CLA has conjugated double bonds thus it is
    chemically very different from "ordinary trans fats" which have isolated
    double bonds or (for most) just one at all.

    But I agree in so far that the definition of trans fatty acids is not
    exclusive and also does contain CLA.
     
  7. MattLB

    MattLB Guest

    montygram wrote:
    >
    > Consider this: if it were not for processed food, "trans fat" would
    > not be an issue. CLA is a trans fat produced by many animals and is
    > sold as a health supplement,


    As a fat loss supplement sure, but not as a health promoting supplement.
    For one thing, CLA increases lipid peroxidation by 50%:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/...ve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=15277146

    so you should be ranting against it.

    > yet chemically speaking, it is undeniably
    > a "trans fat." It's a worthless topic unless terms and phrases are
    > defined with scientific pre


    Precision was that? Trans fat is a precise term when it is the presence
    of a trans double bond in the fat that has the health implications.

    MattLB
     
  8. Cubit

    Cubit Guest

    -but wasn't there a study showing reduced cancer rates with CLA?


    "MattLB" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > montygram wrote:
    > >
    > > Consider this: if it were not for processed food, "trans fat" would
    > > not be an issue. CLA is a trans fat produced by many animals and is
    > > sold as a health supplement,

    >
    > As a fat loss supplement sure, but not as a health promoting supplement.
    > For one thing, CLA increases lipid peroxidation by 50%:
    >
    >

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/...ve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=15277146
    >
    > so you should be ranting against it.
    >
    > > yet chemically speaking, it is undeniably
    > > a "trans fat." It's a worthless topic unless terms and phrases are
    > > defined with scientific pre

    >
    > Precision was that? Trans fat is a precise term when it is the presence
    > of a trans double bond in the fat that has the health implications.
    >
    > MattLB
     
  9. MMu

    MMu Guest

    > -but wasn't there a study showing reduced cancer rates with CLA?

    There were a few.. this is one of them:

    Corl BA, Barbano DM, Bauman DE, Ip C.
    cis-9, trans-11 CLA derived endogenously from trans-11 18:1 reduces cancer
    risk in rats.
    J Nutr. 2003 Sep;133(9):2893-900
     
  10. MMu

    MMu Guest

  11. Slowhand

    Slowhand Guest

    "MMu" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > It won't work like this.
    > "Total Fat" contains more than just triglycerides, thus, if you substract
    > saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (trans fats are
    > containing either monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fatty acids with a
    > trans configuration, so they might be in there already) the rest will not

    be
    > trans fats but, very probably mostly other fat soluable food components.


    Thanks, that's most helpful.
     
Loading...