Transam on a Moped?

Discussion in 'rec.bicycles.rides archive' started by Stan, Jan 23, 2003.

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  1. Stan

    Stan Guest

    When I retire in two years, I plan to ride the Virginia-Oregon Transam route on my Vision R54
    recumbent bike. My wife would like to share in the adventure, and I very much want to include her.

    The problem: she has bad knees. She's had arthroscopic surgery twice on each knee. Her doctor says
    the next operation will be a joint replacement. So, cycling across the country is out of the
    question for her.

    My brilliant (?) solution is to buy her a motor scooter, AKA moped -- something with a 50 cc engine
    such as a Yamaha Zuma. It's pretty quiet, and compatible with my 12 MPH pace. As a bonus (for me),
    we could get her a trailer to carry the heavier gear.

    Question #1: Has anyone had any experience with such a "mixed marriage"? Any "gottchas"?

    Question #2: Would she be unwelcome at "Ride Across . . ." or "Tour de
    . . ." events even if she registered as a rider? It would seem that, legally, she could join me on
    public roads, but would this be poor biking etiquette? We'd like to participate in tours such as
    this, but not if people would take offense at a moped in their midst.
     
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  2. In article <[email protected]>, Stan <[email protected]> wrote:
    >When I retire in two years, I plan to ride the Virginia-Oregon Transam route on my Vision R54
    >recumbent bike. My wife would like to share in the adventure, and I very much want to include her.
    >
    >The problem: she has bad knees. She's had arthroscopic surgery twice on each knee. Her doctor says
    >the next operation will be a joint replacement. So, cycling across the country is out of the
    >question for her.
    >
    >My brilliant (?) solution is to buy her a motor scooter, AKA moped -- something with a 50 cc engine
    >such as a Yamaha Zuma. It's pretty quiet, and compatible with my 12 MPH pace. As a bonus (for me),
    >we could get her a trailer to carry the heavier gear.
    >
    >Question #1: Has anyone had any experience with such a "mixed marriage"? Any "gottchas"?
    >
    >Question #2: Would she be unwelcome at "Ride Across . . ." or "Tour de
    >. . ." events even if she registered as a rider? It would seem that, legally, she could join me on
    > public roads, but would this be poor biking etiquette? We'd like to participate in tours such as
    > this, but not if people would take offense at a moped in their midst.

    I think it would not be well received by some riders. I suppose you could discuss it with the
    organizers of the event. Personally I would not really want to be riding in a group at the elbow of
    a person on a moped I didn't know, someone who might not be careful or skilled. For a cyclist I
    think that is "healthy paranoia". She might also consider offering herself on the moped as a
    volunteer on a big organized ride. I think the moped rider with a group of cyclists scenario
    probably would work best in a local club setting where people could get comfortable with it and get
    to know the rider, discuss safety, etc.

    I think the E-Bike type products would probably be better received among cyclists since it is more
    like a bike, quieter, doesn't stink, etc. Obviously it has substantial range limitations that rule
    out long journeys on battery power.

    --Paul
     
  3. On 20 Jan 2003 06:42:38 -0800, [email protected] (Stan) wrote:

    >My brilliant (?) solution is to buy her a motor scooter, AKA moped -- something with a 50 cc engine
    >such as a Yamaha Zuma. It's pretty quiet, and compatible with my 12 MPH pace. As a bonus (for me),
    >we could get her a trailer to carry the heavier gear.

    One thing is that each state has different laws on mopeds. Some require tags and insurance, some
    don't. Some require pedals to be on the moped, some don't. The trailer part might also be in
    question as state laws in certain states probably prohibit mopeds from having "bobs"

    http://www.moped2.org has plenty of information to help you.
     
  4. Pat Clancy

    Pat Clancy Guest

    You might want to consider, at least for a TransAm passage, something larger than a moped. Maybe
    something like the Honda Reflex. Yes, it's lot more expensive than a moped, and it almost certainly
    wouldn't be welcome in group rides. However, in crossing the country I'm thinking about potential
    emergency situations where speed and carrying capacity might be critical. You would never choose
    this machine specifically for highway travel and touring, but in a pinch it would give you the
    ability to carry two-up at highway speeds. It would also probably be a lot more quieter and
    comfortable for her than a moped. Remember, she will also be putting in many hours in the saddle.

    Pat

    [email protected] (Stan) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > When I retire in two years, I plan to ride the Virginia-Oregon Transam route on my Vision R54
    > recumbent bike. My wife would like to share in the adventure, and I very much want to include her.
    >
    > The problem: she has bad knees. She's had arthroscopic surgery twice on each knee. Her doctor says
    > the next operation will be a joint replacement. So, cycling across the country is out of the
    > question for her.
    >
    > My brilliant (?) solution is to buy her a motor scooter, AKA moped -- something with a 50 cc
    > engine such as a Yamaha Zuma. It's pretty quiet, and compatible with my 12 MPH pace. As a bonus
    > (for me), we could get her a trailer to carry the heavier gear.
    >
    > Question #1: Has anyone had any experience with such a "mixed marriage"? Any "gottchas"?
    >
    > Question #2: Would she be unwelcome at "Ride Across . . ." or "Tour de
    > . . ." events even if she registered as a rider? It would seem that, legally, she could join me on
    > public roads, but would this be poor biking etiquette? We'd like to participate in tours such as
    > this, but not if people would take offense at a moped in their midst.
     
  5. Ray

    Ray Guest

    in article Qz7X9.30145$A%[email protected], Paul Southworth at
    [email protected] wrote on 1/21/03 3:31 AM:

    > Stan <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> When I retire in two years, I plan to ride the Virginia-Oregon Transam route on my Vision
    >> R54 recumbent bike. My wife would like to share in the adventure, and I very much want to
    >> include her.
    >>

    When I did a 2000 mile portion of the TransAm in the early 80's I caught up with a fellow doing
    exactly what you're considering. His wife rode at her own speed which usually was considerably
    faster than her cyclist husband. She'd rush ahead to get cool drinks or find a camping spot and then
    meet up with her spouse at her leisure. She carried the heavier items while he carried a pared down
    load. They both seemed to be enjoying themselves immensely.

    For the transcontinental, I say go for it! You have to think of other cyclists on organized, shorter
    rides though.

    Ray
     
  6. John Gorentz

    John Gorentz Guest

    Ray wrote:

    > > Stan <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> When I retire in two years, I plan to ride the Virginia-Oregon Transam route on my Vision
    > >> R54 recumbent bike. My wife would like to share in the adventure, and I very much want to
    > >> include her.
    > >>
    > When I did a 2000 mile portion of the TransAm in the early 80's I caught up with a fellow doing
    > exactly what you're considering. His wife rode at her own speed which usually was considerably
    > faster than her cyclist husband. She'd rush ahead to get cool drinks or find a camping spot and
    > then meet up with her spouse at her leisure. She carried the heavier items while he carried a
    > pared down load. They both seemed to be enjoying themselves immensely.
    >
    > For the transcontinental, I say go for it! You have to think of other cyclists on organized,
    > shorter rides though.

    This is giving me some ideas. I've often wished my wife could go touring with
    me. She tries riding once in a while, but various physical ailments keep her from doing much. She
    has suggested one of those Ebikes, but I figure that with those, when the battery gives out she
    is left with a really clunky vehicle to pedal, which wouldn't be much fun at all.

    A regular moped might be better. We're both about the same size, and wear the same size bikes. If
    she wants to get in 5 miles or so of riding each day, I could let her ride my bike while I take the
    moped. I would have to overcome the psychological barrier of wanting to pedal every foot of the way
    myself, but maybe it would be worth it.

    I owned a 50cc Peugot moped back in the late 70s -- rode it to work a lot, took a spill a couple of
    times and made a mess of myself that she didn't want to allow into her clean house. My memory isn't
    all that clear, but I remember it being a bit on the noisy side -- not something that would allow
    for conversation while we ride together. Maybe there are some quieter machines out there. Or maybe
    it doesn't matter that much because there isn't all that much side-by-side riding anyway.

    John Gorentz
     
  7. Pat Clancy wrote:

    in every state, if it is over 50cc (a moped), she would be required to have a motorcycle license. I
    had a 70cc scooter in the early 80's and it was considered legally to be a motorcycle in every state
    (I have a motorcycle license). And moped laws like I said vary from state to state or even town to
    town. For example in Maryland, mopeds are legal without tags or insurance but totally illegal to
    ride in the city of Baltimore. A lot of considerations to figure in in multi state moped riding.
     
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