Transferable fitness

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Wild Wind, Jun 14, 2004.

  1. Roger Hughes

    Roger Hughes Guest

    Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:
    > Cycling won't make you a better rower, unless you buy a
    > rowbike, for simple and obvious reasons,

    Why not? Cycling and rowing on a sliding seat use very
    similar bits of you at similar levels of intensity. And
    several of my personal bests date from when I used to train
    with the university boat club...

    Roger
     


  2. Wild Wind

    Wild Wind Guest

    "Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Wild Wind wrote:
    >
    > > And is there an objective measurement of fitness like a
    > > 'fitness index' that you can use to rate your fitness?
    >
    > You'd have to define fitness rather less nebulously if you
    > want to measure it. But it will really mean different
    > things for different activities once you get past a very
    > general level.

    Interestingly enough, Peter, a few people have been
    mentioning resting pulse rate as a measure of fitness. How
    useful/accurate is this?
     
  3. Gawnsoft

    Gawnsoft Guest

    On Mon, 14 Jun 2004 22:46:43 +0100, "Wild Wind" <[email protected]>
    wrote (more or less):

    >
    >"Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> Wild Wind wrote:
    >>
    >> > And is there an objective measurement of fitness like a
    >> > 'fitness index' that you can use to rate your fitness?
    >>
    >> You'd have to define fitness rather less nebulously if
    >> you want to measure it. But it will really mean different
    >> things for different activities once you get past a very
    >> general level.
    >
    >Interestingly enough, Peter, a few people have been
    >mentioning resting pulse rate as a measure of fitness. How
    >useful/accurate is this?

    A much better measure is time taken to return to resting
    pulse rate after exercise is finished.

    --
    Cheers, Euan Gawnsoft: http://www.gawnsoft.co.sr
    Symbian/Epoc wiki: http://html.dnsalias.net:1122 Smalltalk
    links (harvested from comp.lang.smalltalk)
    http://html.dnsalias.net/gawnsoft/smalltalk
     
  4. Peter Fox

    Peter Fox Guest

    Following on from Wild Wind's message. . .
    >Quite often, increased fitness is cited as a reason for
    >taking up cycling.
    >
    >However, I am in some doubt about this, primarily because I
    >am not even *sure* what the defintion of 'fitness' is.
    _My_ definition is "the ability to do exercise/work"[1]

    That is, in this ng, from scratch, each 10mile ride and
    each slog up the hill (and each rest day) makes the next
    one easier.
    >Is 'fitness' the ability to do everyday tasks without much
    >exertion? If so, then I don't think that you gain much
    >extra fitness after taking up cycling for a while.
    (By this I take it that you don't keep getting fitter and
    fitter and fitter even if you do more miles) Of course not -
    else the TdF would be over in a nanosecond. But you make a
    point well worth making: For up to 100mile per week cyclist
    without athletic ambitions - after say a month that's about
    as fit as you'll be. (But technique and attention to detail
    could make improvements - for which you need somebody with a
    bit of coaching experience.)
    >In fact, I'm beginning to think that regular cycling just
    >makes you a better cyclist, and not, for example, a better
    >jogger or oarsman.
    [Arghh I forget the details] A study of 10 men was done into
    the effectiveness of regular exercise in old age. One was a
    cyclist the others joggers.[USA!] When they were put on an
    exercise bike the cyclist was streets ahead [good] in oxygen
    consumption or Cardio-vascular (or some jargon) measurement.
    But my guess is that the joggers would have done as well on
    a _treadmill_, it was just that the cyclist was on home
    ground using familiar muscles. This may be relevant to your
    assertion that a fit cyclist may not be /as fit/ when asked
    to do different work. But then that might apply to all sorts
    of things.
    >
    >So perhaps anyone in the group could put me straight on all
    >these issues? Specifically, do you find that having taken
    >up cycling, you are able to do other everyday tasks a lot
    >better? If so, which tasks in particular do you find that
    >cycling has improved your ability to do? Has cycling
    >improved your ability to do other *strenuous* tasks?
    >
    _Mentally_ yes. A lot of fitness is knowing *YOU CAN DO IT*
    rather than getting in the car as a cop out. Last week I
    persuaded 3 chaps to join me on a warm evening cycle ride -
    "8 miles! [on the flat] That'll kill me". They were self-
    defeated before they started.[2]

    Age and gender is an important variable. Teenagers (the
    ignorant, smug, bastards) are, if 'sporty', able to work
    surprisingly hard with precious little preparation, but can
    lack the stamina of veterans. My personal opinion is that if
    you have to work at something _where you know what to
    expect_ you're better able to put your resources where they
    matter and put up with the grief 'cos you know it will be
    over in a few moments, or conversely not to go flat out at
    the start of the 400 mile race.

    [1] My contribution to the FAQ: Losing weight by cycling:-
    You will soon find cycling becomes much easier as your
    muscles get used to the work. Now you have a good set of
    muscles capable of some sustained effort you can use
    them to burn off some calories without much pain and a
    lot of pleasure. Don't over do it but don't be afraid of
    a couple of minutes of 150% effort either.

    [2] Poor buggers: The Monday-club ride next week is 17 miles
    and 3 or 4 pubs before we get back to the Dolphin. -
    Should I make an advance booking with air-sea-rescue?

    --
    PETER FOX Not the same since the bridge building business
    collapsed [email protected]n.co.uk.not.this.bit.no.html
     
  5. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Gawnsoft wrote:
    > On Mon, 14 Jun 2004 22:46:43 +0100, "Wild Wind"
    > <[email protected]> wrote (more or less):

    >>Interestingly enough, Peter, a few people have been
    >>mentioning resting pulse rate as a measure of fitness. How
    >>useful/accurate is this?

    > A much better measure is time taken to return to resting
    > pulse rate after exercise is finished.

    What this will show is overall cardio "torque": a quick
    return shows you haven't really done anything too serious
    that the system has been stretched more than it can easily
    recover. The resting pulse is your "idle speed". The lower
    it is, the more room for expansion there is in the cardio
    delivery system, though there is a degree of natural
    variation in this anyway. But still the case that specific
    sport fitness isn't being measured in any way. You might
    have God's Own cardio system but if the muscles and skills
    aren't in place for a certain activity it'll "merely" be
    helpful rather than decisive.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer Tel 44 1382 660111
    ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital Fax 44 1382
    640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net
    [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  6. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    Gawnsoft wrote:

    >> Interestingly enough, Peter, a few people have been
    >> mentioning resting pulse rate as a measure of fitness.
    >> How useful/accurate is this?

    > A much better measure is time taken to return to resting
    > pulse rate after exercise is finished.

    Agreed. Although my resting heart rate is now under 60 (just
    measured 56) whereas it used to be in the mid 80s when I was
    a fatbastard.

    --
    Guy
    ===
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after
    posting. http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    Victory is ours! Down with Eric the Half A Brain!
     
  7. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    On Mon, 14 Jun 2004 13:19:06 +0100, Peter Clinch
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Wild Wind wrote:
    >
    >> And is there an objective measurement of fitness like a
    >> 'fitness index' that you can use to rate your fitness?
    >
    >You'd have to define fitness rather less nebulously if you
    >want to measure it. But it will really mean different
    >things for different activities once you get past a very
    >general level.

    Fitness for what? Fitness can be divided into four headings:
    endurance, strength, flexibility and speed. Different sports
    require these in different mixes. Very few (judo is a
    notable exception) require a high degree of all four.
    General cycling promotes endurance and strength, although
    the latter is very specific to the activity, and does
    nothing for flexibilty. It is, however, an excellent
    activity for promoting "fitness for life". It improves
    general health, quality of life and longevity. Occasionally
    we get killed by a motor vehicle.

    --
    Dave...

    Get a bicycle. You will not regret it. If you live. -
    Mark Twain
     
  8. James Hodson

    James Hodson Guest

    On Mon, 14 Jun 2004 21:27:36 +0900, James Annan
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Clive George wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Cycling gives me the cardiovascular fitness I use in
    >> other activities (normally hillwalking, some XC skiing
    >> this year). I spend much more time on the bike than doing
    >> these other things, so I think it's reasonable to ascribe
    >> my fitness to that.
    >
    >Cycling keeps us fit enough to be pretty quick up hills
    >when walking. However there is a bit of a problem with
    >descending...if we don't go walking regularly enough, we
    >get very stiff thighs afterwards.

    Hi James

    My legs are a bit tired today, having only re-started
    cycling in anger and recently and having overdone my riding
    in this hot weather for the last few days. Today is the
    seventh day.

    I rarely walk. Although I am able to walk many a mile
    without to much discomfort at the time, I do suffer
    afterwards. Rather like Callas', my spine doesn't make a
    straight line.

    So, when I'm riding downhill I still keep my legs turning
    over. Only on bends do I stop pedalling.

    James
     
  9. Callas

    Callas Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Callas <[email protected]> writes:

    > >Also, with cycling, fitness = gorgeous legs.
    >
    > Dunno - mine are currently covered in bruises as well as
    > sunburnt...

    Don't fall off? :)

    --
    Callas
     
  10. Roos Eisma

    Roos Eisma Guest

    Callas <[email protected]> writes:

    >> Dunno - mine are currently covered in bruises as well as
    >> sunburnt...

    >Don't fall off? :)

    Don't move house :)

    (which was necessary to have a better garage to store my
    new 'bent :)

    Roos
     
  11. sdorrity

    sdorrity New Member

    Joined:
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    Just my tuppence worth

    I have got back into ccling this year and can attribute virtually all of my current fitness to it.

    in 6 months I have lost about 12kg and am up to about 140km/week.

    Today I noticed that I could walk up the hill to my kids school smiling (not wincing) I can swim about 20% further under water.

    basically every so often I realize that something has changed - like I can talk while walking with one of my workmates who has a VERY fast pace,

    my back stopped hurting - when did that happen?

    last Sunday I rode around the Island (Guernsey) when I got back I felt pretty good so I did it again, headwinds don't bother me as much, neither do hills

    so I'd say that cycling is a good all round form of exercise

    regards

    Steve D
     
  12. Sue

    Sue Guest

    In message <%[email protected]>,
    sdorrity <[email protected]> writes

    my back stopped hurting - when did that happen? < ... > so
    I'd say that cycling is a good all round form of exercise

    Mine started hurting. I was cycling everywhere and not
    walking or running at all, and despite doing quite a bit
    of swimming I'd lost mobility in my lower spine. Some
    simple exercises, and a bit of time spent running, keep my
    back happy.

    I don't think there's one perfect all-round sport, a mixture
    of different activities is better for everyone.

    --
    Sue ];:))

    Cow steeplechasing is fun, and slightly safer than it looks
     
  13. dailuggs

    dailuggs New Member

    Joined:
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    well since taking up cycling my heart rate has dropped from 90something to a steady 54, and still dropping, i'm also out of breath a lot less often, can now take the dog for a run instead of a stroll, and just feel a hell of a lot better. also in the last 4 months ive lost 20kg. and am currently upto 200 miles a week, next week im upping it to 250. i can also hold my breath longer, and i'm sleeping better. although i must admit my upper body strength has suffered a bit
     
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