Transformation info

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Wwest, Dec 14, 2003.

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  1. Wwest

    Wwest Guest

    I am rather new to cycling, and have an older Univega Alpina Country that I won in a contest about
    12 years ago. I think that particular model was at the time considered a hybrid bike with the
    crowbar handlebars and the knobby tires. I am wondering if I could reasonably turn this into a road
    bike by replacing the knobby tires with road tires and replacing the handlebars with the curved road
    bars, brake/shifter combination, etc. Would it be cost-effective to do so? I just recently bought a
    Trek 4500 to accomodate the all-around riding that I am presently doing, but want something
    specifically for road use and faster speeds than the Trek I have. Thanks in advance for any advice!
     
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  2. In article <[email protected]>,
    wwest <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I am rather new to cycling, and have an older Univega Alpina Country that I won in a contest about
    >12 years ago. I think that particular model was at the time considered a hybrid bike with the
    >crowbar handlebars and the knobby tires. I am wondering if I could reasonably turn this into a road
    >bike by replacing the knobby tires with road tires and replacing the handlebars with the curved
    >road bars, brake/shifter combination, etc.

    You could make that change, although it wouldn't really make it a "road bike".

    > Would it be cost-effective to do so?

    No.

    > I just recently bought a Trek 4500 to accomodate the all-around riding that I am presently doing,
    > but want something specifically for road use and faster speeds than the Trek I have. Thanks in
    > advance for any advice!

    I would consider changing the tires and nothing else. The tires are the item that will make the
    biggest improvement and cost the least.

    --Paul
     
  3. "Paul Southworth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:Sr1Db.39064$A%[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, wwest <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >I am rather new to cycling, and have an older Univega Alpina Country that
    I
    > >won in a contest about 12 years ago. I think that particular model was
    at
    > >the time considered a hybrid bike with the crowbar handlebars and the
    knobby
    > >tires. I am wondering if I could reasonably turn this into a road bike
    by
    > >replacing the knobby tires with road tires and replacing the handlebars
    with
    > >the curved road bars, brake/shifter combination, etc.

    [snip]

    > I would consider changing the tires and nothing else. The tires are the item that will make the
    > biggest improvement and cost the least.

    I agree with Paul. Tire change is cheap and easy. You could also put bar ends on the straight bars,
    giving you a few more hand positions, another easy and relatively inexpensive change. The rest is
    more trouble and money than it is worth it.

    --
    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky
    Please replace earthlink for mouse-potato and .net for .com

    Home of the meditative cyclist:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm

    Books just wanna be FREE! See what I mean at:
    http://bookcrossing.com/friend/Cpetersky
     
  4. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <Sr1Db.39064$A%[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Paul Southworth) writes:
    > In article <[email protected]>, wwest <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>I am rather new to cycling, and have an older Univega Alpina Country that I won in a contest about
    >>12 years ago. I think that particular model was at the time considered a hybrid bike with the
    >>crowbar handlebars and the knobby tires. I am wondering if I could reasonably turn this into a
    >>road bike by replacing the knobby tires with road tires and replacing the handlebars with the
    >>curved road bars, brake/shifter combination, etc.
    >
    > You could make that change, although it wouldn't really make it a "road bike".

    An interesting coincidence -- I was just looking at this page:
    http://briandesousa.com/bicycling/tech/convert.htm

    Brian DeSousa's account of his MTB -> touring bike conversion. He gives much detailed description,
    complete with cost breakdowns.

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  5. Claire Petersky wrote: [snip]
    >
    > I agree with Paul. Tire change is cheap and easy. You could also put bar ends on the straight
    > bars, giving you a few more hand positions, another easy and relatively inexpensive change. The
    > rest is more trouble and money than it is worth it.

    Trouble, yes, but not always expensive. I converted my Specialized Crossroads from straight bars to
    'priest' bars, and then to drop bars with bar-ends. The final conversion cost about $25 for a used
    set of barcons, plus some tape and cables. The bars and stem came from a free donor.

    Lots of fiddling, though. At least with barcons the left/front shifter is friction mode, but even
    so, it was finicky to get it just right with typice hybrid MTB derailers. And of course, no brake
    adjusters on either canti brakes or road levers, so inline ones are called for. Not installed yet,
    just called for.

    I find I shift less with barcons than with twist grips, but often enough. When I do shift, it's like
    a Honda 5-speed on a good day - snicks right into gear as if telepathy were involved. Twist grips
    always felt like brute force to me.
     
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