Transition Advice regarding shoes

Discussion in 'Triathlon' started by Jim Gosse, May 1, 2003.

  1. Jim Gosse

    Jim Gosse Guest

    Wondering how most agegroupers handle the swim to bike transition with regard to bike shoes. Does
    anyone keep the shoes clipped to the pedals like the pros? Are there any tricks for keeping the shoe
    open and straps out of the way, and the shoe upright?

    I just bought my first set of bike shoes. With the speedplay cleats and adapters screwed in, I can't
    imagine running in them from the bike rack to the bike mounting/dismounting area.

    Let me know what you think!!

    --
    Jim Gosse Technician, Wave Tank 737-3221 [email protected]
     
    Tags:


  2. ~Ironman~

    ~Ironman~ Guest

    I keep them clipped and jump up onto the bike before sliding my feet in. Easy and work.

    "Jim Gosse" <[email protected]> ¦b¶l¥ó news:[email protected] ¤¤¼¶¼g...
    > Wondering how most agegroupers handle the swim to bike transition with regard to bike shoes. Does
    > anyone keep the shoes clipped to the pedals
    like
    > the pros? Are there any tricks for keeping the shoe open and straps out of the way, and the shoe
    > upright?
    >
    > I just bought my first set of bike shoes. With the speedplay cleats and adapters screwed in, I
    > can't imagine running in them from the bike rack to the bike mounting/dismounting area.
    >
    > Let me know what you think!!
    >
    > --
    > Jim Gosse Technician, Wave Tank 737-3221 [email protected]
     
  3. Fastest transitions with bike shoes:

    Bike to run: on approach to transition, open straps on both shoes. Remove right (or left, depending
    on preference) foot from shoe, stand on shoe. Remove other foot from shoe, throw leg over saddle.
    Control speed with brakes to dismount line, step off on right foot, run to transition rack. At rack,
    rack bike before helmet off, shoes on.

    Swim to bike: Clip shoes to bike pedals. Run an elastic band from an appropriate part of the shoe
    to an appropriate part of the bike (e.g. front derailleur or bottle holder) to hold shoe flat
    (reduces dragging on ground). At mount line, depending on proficiency, either: 1) flying leap to
    land with feet on shoes OR 2) put shoe on forward pedal, drive down, throw other leg over saddle.
    Pedal up to speed. Put one foot in shoe, tighten strap, pedal up to speed. Put other foot in shoe,
    tighten strap.

    Run to bike: At transition stand, helmet on first, simultaneously drag shoes off with alternate feet
    on heels. Then as above.

    Practise, practise, practise. A good transition is < 10 seconds with this method, not counting
    running time between actual transition points (end of swim or run, start of bike etc). Talcum powder
    in shoes helps.

    Worst thing that can go wrong with this method is that you forget to take the standing foot out of
    the shoe, so you lose any gain you get by 'scooting' in otherwise...and I've done that a few times.
    I don't have a comparison of these transition times with platform pedals, sorry. STF
     
  4. BUT, is this pre-attaching pedals to the bike, REALLY the fastest way to transition from swim to
    bike to run? I don't believe that once you are out of the transition area and fumbling around with
    the shoes at the start of the bike leg, that one gains much more time in total/overall. What I mean
    is, the transition time on the clock may look quicker, but actually one loses all that gained time
    with fumbling on the start of the bike leg!

    I also think that the potential for accidents in the first 500m of the bike section is heightened by
    people wobbling all over the place on the bike. I do recall seeing certain feamle elite members in
    the Commonwealth Games triathlon, who could not get their feet properly into the pedals, then fell
    off! And what if the bike section suddenly goes uphill straight from transition?

    So, I am going to do the opposing method this weekend because I think it is more efficient: simply
    jump in and out of the pedals with my Carnac shoes on...also gives one the great opportunity to make
    a serious attack at the begiining of the bike leg too...teee heee...

    R

    "Stewart Fleming" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Fastest transitions with bike shoes:
    >
    > Bike to run: on approach to transition, open straps on both shoes. Remove right (or left,
    > depending on preference) foot from shoe, stand on shoe. Remove other foot from shoe, throw leg
    > over saddle. Control speed with brakes to dismount line, step off on right foot, run to transition
    > rack. At rack, rack bike before helmet off, shoes on.
    >
    > Swim to bike: Clip shoes to bike pedals. Run an elastic band from an appropriate part of the shoe
    > to an appropriate part of the bike (e.g. front derailleur or bottle holder) to hold shoe flat
    > (reduces dragging on ground). At mount line, depending on proficiency, either: 1) flying leap to
    > land with feet on shoes OR 2) put shoe on forward pedal, drive down, throw other leg over saddle.
    > Pedal up to speed. Put one foot in shoe, tighten strap, pedal up to speed. Put other foot in shoe,
    > tighten strap.
    >
    > Run to bike: At transition stand, helmet on first, simultaneously drag shoes off with alternate
    > feet on heels. Then as above.
    >
    > Practise, practise, practise. A good transition is < 10 seconds with this method, not counting
    > running time between actual transition points (end of swim or run, start of bike etc). Talcum
    > powder in shoes helps.
    >
    > Worst thing that can go wrong with this method is that you forget to take the standing foot out of
    > the shoe, so you lose any gain you get by 'scooting' in otherwise...and I've done that a few
    > times. I don't have a comparison of these transition times with platform pedals, sorry. STF
     
  5. Rebecca Bishop wrote:

    > BUT, is this pre-attaching pedals to the bike, REALLY the fastest way to transition from swim to
    > bike to run? I don't believe that once you are out

    With practice, yes. That's why you spin up to speed immediately and after each foot. Single strap
    shoes are easier to handle.

    > I also think that the potential for accidents in the first 500m of the bike section is heightened
    > by people wobbling all over the place on the bike. I do recall seeing certain feamle elite members
    > in the Commonwealth Games triathlon, who could not get their feet properly into the pedals, then
    > fell off! And what if the bike section suddenly goes uphill straight from transition?

    Again, practice. It has to be instinctive feel for where your feet go on the bike, how you reach for
    heel loops and straps etc. On rainy days we occasionally get a group together here and just do
    transitions (even onto a turbo-mounted bike :)) Duathlon worlds in Alpharetta last year, yes
    straight uphill from transition. Not a problem.

    > So, I am going to do the opposing method this weekend because I think it is more efficient: simply
    > jump in and out of the pedals with my Carnac shoes on...also gives one the great opportunity to
    > make a serious attack at the begiining of the bike leg too...teee heee...

    How would you plan to cope with a downhill run from transition to mount point in cleated slippery
    shoes, again as was the case for Alpharetta?

    But, good luck and do let me know what the results are. STF
     
  6. I agree with Rebecca, I like to put my shoes on and run with them to the mount line, then flying
    mount onto the bike, and take off down the road. I've never done the shoes clipped in already
    method.... but everyone I race against does. I typically beat everyone that exits the water with
    me to the mount line, and I already have my shoes on, imagine the gain there. The quick start off
    the mount line is particularly important for me as my strength is the bike leg, combine that with
    the out of sight, out of mind philosophy, and many of my competitors just wait to try and get me
    on the run.
     
  7. Bill Wallace

    Bill Wallace Guest

    Whatever you do, practice it over and over again.

    I stood at the bike outlet at Wildflower long course last year. As soon as you were past the point
    where they let you mount, there was a gentle slope up for about 20 meters. The first 3 or 4 guys
    out, the pros, looked smooth. However, I would say at least 3 out of 4 (if not more) of everyone
    else who had shoes clipped in, screwed up.

    I saw several people fall over. A few fall over twice. Several people took out other riders, blood a
    few times and one guy broke his seat post when he fell. The crowed loved it, it was a real comedy.

    One good strategy seemed to be to ride on top of the shoes until you had lots of momentum. This is
    what most of the pros did.

    I use SPD and can shuffle along just fine in them. My strategy is to use synthetic socks so they
    slip on my wet feet easily, have the shoes wide open and ready to slip into, sitting next to the
    bike and to be real careful and deliberate about getting to the mounting point. Rules typically say
    no running anyway.

    BW

    "Jim Gosse" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Wondering how most agegroupers handle the swim to bike transition with regard to bike shoes. Does
    > anyone keep the shoes clipped to the pedals like the pros? Are there any tricks for keeping the
    > shoe open and straps out of the way, and the shoe upright?
    >
    > I just bought my first set of bike shoes. With the speedplay cleats and adapters screwed in, I
    > can't imagine running in them from the bike rack to the bike mounting/dismounting area.
    >
    > Let me know what you think!!
     
  8. Bill Wallace wrote:

    > One good strategy seemed to be to ride on top of the shoes until you had lots of momentum. This is
    > what most of the pros did.

    Of course you have to do this. Nothing else is stable.
     
  9. Kristian

    Kristian New Member

    Joined:
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    0
    How do you beat everyone that you exit out of the water with to the mount line if you stop and while standing still put your shoes on? Perhaps the question should be what is taking them so long???
    I have seen guys slip over when their hard plastic or metal cleats hit the road. Its like ice skating. That cant be safe! If people are wobbling all over the road cos they have 1 hand off the bars then they should either gain more momentum or learn to handle a bike better. Heven help us if these people need to take out and replace their drink bottles.
    If you just want to have fun in a race, and dont care about times or places or missing the pack, then sure pop your shoes on in transition (perhaps some talc while you're there). But dont tell people new to the sport it is faster, that information is just incorrect.
     
  10. Pat Bell

    Pat Bell Guest

    Kristian <[email protected]> wrote:
    > How do you beat everyone that you exit out of the water with to the mount line if you stop
    > and while standing still put your shoes on? Perhaps the question should be what is taking
    > them so long???

    The time difference between grabbing your bike and running off (because your shoes are clipped in)
    and lifting each leg once to throw your shoes on and then taking your bike and leaving is about 3
    seconds. The fact that I beat most of them to the mount line is probably because my wetsuit come off
    real easy.

    > I have seen guys slip over when their hard plastic or metal cleats hit the road. Its like ice
    > skating. That cant be safe! If people are wobbling all over the road cos they have 1 hand off the
    > bars then they should either gain more momentum or learn to handle a bike better. Heven help us if
    > these people need to take out and replace their drink bottles.

    You're right, it's an embarassing site to see.

    > If you just want to have fun in a race, and dont care about times or places or missing the pack,
    > then sure pop your shoes on in transition (perhaps some talc while you're there). But dont tell
    > people new to the sport it is faster, that information is just incorrect.

    Incorrect for YOU maybe, but not me. I do have fun at races but I also care about times and
    places. I've never missed the pack that I left the water with, including national level races
    (both draft legal and illegal) where it should be assumed that at least some of the best
    transitioners in the nation are racing. Those 3 extra seconds that I spend in the transition area
    are more than made up in the first 1/4 mile after the mount line when I get to sprint around
    people fiddling with their shoes.

    I'm not saying that putting your shoes on in transition is the only way to go, I'm refuting the
    claim that having your shoes clipped in is the absolute superior method. My advice to anyone trying
    to decide how to transition is to try both methods and see which one works for them. But don't just
    time yourself to the mount line, time yourself to the 1/2 mile mark of the bike leg.
     
  11. Jeff Cook

    Jeff Cook Guest

    Stewart Fleming <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    <snip>
    >
    > But, good luck and do let me know what the results are. STF
    >

    And good luck in your race (NZ Duathlon Champs) next weekend, Stewart.

    Show them how to get it right with the shoes too ...

    Cheers

    Jeff
     
  12. Your message consists entirely of quoted text. Please enter your reply.

    PATRICK BELL E <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I agree with Rebecca, I like to put my shoes on and run with them to the mount line, then flying
    > mount onto the bike, and take off down the road. I've never done the shoes clipped in already
    > method.... but everyone I race against does. I typically beat everyone that exits the water with
    > me to the mount line, and I already have my shoes on, imagine the gain there. The quick start off
    > the mount line is particularly important for me as my strength is the bike leg, combine that with
    > the out of sight, out of mind philosophy, and many of my competitors just wait to try and get me
    > on the run.
     
  13. Stewart,...well I can't say I got my tranistion perfect this weekend!:) This was my first triathlon
    in 8 years - and yes, I realise I would need to learn 'all the tricks in the book' regarding getting
    shoes on/off visa-vee different transition scenarios - so I'll be practicing this week onwards with
    the bike shoes. I see that triathlon has moved on a bit since I used to do them. I got a yellow card
    and 10 second penalty yesterday because I did not keep my helmet on until I mounted the bike on the
    rack in transition - new rules...so tonnes of things to get right for next time!

    Cheers

    "Stewart Fleming" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > Rebecca Bishop wrote:
    >
    > > BUT, is this pre-attaching pedals to the bike, REALLY the fastest way to transition from swim to
    > > bike to run? I don't believe that once you are
    out
    >
    > With practice, yes. That's why you spin up to speed immediately and after
    each
    > foot. Single strap shoes are easier to handle.
    >
    > > I also think that the potential for accidents in the first 500m of the
    bike
    > > section is heightened by people wobbling all over the place on the bike.
    I
    > > do recall seeing certain feamle elite members in the Commonwealth Games triathlon, who could not
    > > get their feet properly into the pedals, then
    fell
    > > off! And what if the bike section suddenly goes uphill straight from transition?
    >
    > Again, practice. It has to be instinctive feel for where your feet go on
    the
    > bike, how you reach for heel loops and straps etc. On rainy days we occasionally get a group
    > together here and just do transitions (even onto
    a
    > turbo-mounted bike :)) Duathlon worlds in Alpharetta last year, yes
    straight
    > uphill from transition. Not a problem.
    >
    > > So, I am going to do the opposing method this weekend because I think it
    is
    > > more efficient: simply jump in and out of the pedals with my Carnac
    shoes
    > > on...also gives one the great opportunity to make a serious attack at
    the
    > > begiining of the bike leg too...teee heee...
    >
    > How would you plan to cope with a downhill run from transition to mount
    point
    > in cleated slippery shoes, again as was the case for Alpharetta?
    >
    > But, good luck and do let me know what the results are. STF
     
  14. Jeff Cook wrote:

    > And good luck in your race (NZ Duathlon Champs) next weekend, Stewart.
    >
    > Show them how to get it right with the shoes too ...

    Thanks Jeff. It all went OK. 12s and 19s for the two transitions, but nasty cramp on the second run.
    Did enough for Worlds selection. STF
     
  15. Kristian

    Kristian New Member

    Joined:
    May 4, 2003
    Messages:
    81
    Likes Received:
    0
    The time difference between grabbing your bike and running off (because your shoes are clipped in)
    and lifting each leg once to throw your shoes on and then taking your bike and leaving is about 3
    seconds. The fact that I beat most of them to the mount line is probably because my wetsuit come off
    real easy.

    Incorrect for YOU maybe, but not me. I do have fun at races but I also care about times and
    places. I've never missed the pack that I left the water with, including national level races
    (both draft legal and illegal) where it should be assumed that at least some of the best
    transitioners in the nation are racing. Those 3 extra seconds that I spend in the transition area
    are more than made up in the first 1/4 mile after the mount line when I get to sprint around
    people fiddling with their shoes.

    I'm not saying that putting your shoes on in transition is the only way to go, I'm refuting the
    claim that having your shoes clipped in is the absolute superior method. My advice to anyone trying
    to decide how to transition is to try both methods and see which one works for them. But don't just
    time yourself to the mount line, time yourself to the 1/2 mile mark of the bike leg. [/B][/QUOTE]


    You are still running in bike shoes and have to slow down to get on your bike then put the cleats in. If shoes on first were the fastest method all the pros would do it. The difference it not that great and I do see your point that there are merrits to both methods. Good luck next race, might see you there.
     
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