Trek 5000 v Lemond Zurich



David_Durham

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Aug 21, 2004
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I can't run b/o intermittent back pain, but I've found I can bike. Just went 53mi on my 16y old aluminum DiamondBack mountain bike (averaged 13-14mi/h). It's now time for a road bike. I'd like to keep my bike 10-15y. I like to do fitness road rides and long rides. I won't likely race, but I like the sensation of going fast. I will ride in the rain occasionally, and quite honestly, I probably won't do the best job of keeping my bike cleaned and dry. On the other hand, I need something that won't totally jar my back and is a little forgiving. Can you tell me a little about the rides of these two bikes on long rides? If I get fitted properly, will I notice a difference? How quickly does steel rust if I coat it with something and dry it after rides? If I go down on the Trek, what is the durability of carbon?
 

Triodelover

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Aug 3, 2004
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is have a professional fitting, particualrly since you suffer from intermittent back pain. Do this somewhere that uses a dynamic system like the Serotta cycle or BikeFitting.com's Pro system. The fitting can be tailored to how you intended to use the bike.

It's entirely within the realm of possibility that you will need a custom geometry. I did, and before I had the fitting, I assumed I could ride stock because of things like I wore a 44R jacket. I'm 56 and have had arthritis for 20 years, so comfortable fit was of primary importance. Custom may not apply to you, but you sure need to know before plunking down several large on a new ride.

After the fitting is the time to start picking out frames.
 

David_Durham

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Aug 21, 2004
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Triodelover said:
....After the fitting is the time to start picking out frames.
We have two excellent stores in the area, and I'm confident I'll get fitted appropriately. What's your sense, however, about the rides of these bikes and their durability for a rider like me?
 

Triodelover

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Aug 3, 2004
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David_Durham said:
We have two excellent stores in the area, and I'm confident I'll get fitted appropriately.

Don't bet the rent. I went to a LBS that I thought could do the job. Paid for a fitting and the guy took 4 or 5 static measurements and ran them through a calculator. I should have known better but I used them in an on-line purchase decision. WRONG! The frame turns out to be too large and I'll have to sell it.

The LBS had a Serotta system, but that wasn't offered to me. Perhaps that was because I had admitted a preference for hand-made Italian steel, of which they had none. In all fairness, this was a purchase that was returning me to cycling after a long hiatus, so perhaps I should have abandoned my biases. Still, I was prepared to spend 3 Large or so, so I think I should get to buy what I want, regardless of my basis for that preference. And I paid for a fitting, which should have been accurate regardless of my biases.

David_Durham said:
What's your sense, however, about the rides of these bikes and their durability for a rider like me?

At the risk of eliciting another content-free BS from boudreaux, here is something I wrote in response to a "this or that?" in another current thread.

I have a very strong preference for retro/vintage aesthetics and construction. I'll admit to getting a warm, fuzzy over the idea of a handmade bike in a small shop in Italy. (It's all Mendelssohn's fault.) I don't respond to most of the modern frames, especially those with seat tubes that resemble tree trunks. That's not entirely rational since I'm excluding a whole lot of real performers. But there it is.

I ride for fun 'n' fitness, so the weight of steel isn't a major concern to me. I want my bike, just like my car, to grab me emotionally, beyond just being a good technical achievement. (Hell, both cost enough. They better get my juices going since they drained my pocketbook.)

I wanted to share some of my biases so you would know what weight to give my opinion. I think my opinion is valid (but then, don't we all :D). How valuable it is to you will depend on how my biases meld with your own wants and desires.


What gets me going then are frames like Mondinico, Tommasini, or Pegoretti. I have lust in my heart for a randonneur built up on a Mercian or Hetchins frame. Then there's the work of Richard Sachs, Albert Eisentraut, Roland Della Santa and Sasha White at Vanilla here in the US, and many more. All steel, most lugged, all very retro. Don't get me started on chasing the vintage stuff. :)

I confess all this realizing that there is no Holy Grail - a great ride can result from any material so long as it is crafted in the hands of a competent framemaker. An aluminum frame with Dura-Ace or Ultegra can be great - for someone else. All this represents is one man's bias - what he'd prefer to spend his money on.

But none of it negates my original point. Get the most accurate fit possible using a duynamic fitting system then start considering frames, what they are made of and what's hung off 'em. I got it bass-ackwards and was forced to cough up another tuition payment in the College of Life, which goes to show you never quit paying for your education.
 

str8shooter

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Jul 15, 2004
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David_Durham said:
I can't run b/o intermittent back pain, but I've found I can bike. Just went 53mi on my 16y old aluminum DiamondBack mountain bike (averaged 13-14mi/h). It's now time for a road bike. I'd like to keep my bike 10-15y. I like to do fitness road rides and long rides. I won't likely race, but I like the sensation of going fast. I will ride in the rain occasionally, and quite honestly, I probably won't do the best job of keeping my bike cleaned and dry. On the other hand, I need something that won't totally jar my back and is a little forgiving. Can you tell me a little about the rides of these two bikes on long rides? If I get fitted properly, will I notice a difference? How quickly does steel rust if I coat it with something and dry it after rides? If I go down on the Trek, what is the durability of carbon?
I bought a 5000. Great bike, haven't found a thing to gripe about yet. Smooth ride,. I ride for basically the same reason. I have no intentions of racing.

My usual weekend ride is 50-60 miles and 15-25 miles a few nights during the week. The 5000 seems to get my heart pumping pretty good and I'm generally not too beat up after the ride. :)

Good Luck
 

55/Rad

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Jan 30, 2004
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I ride a Trek OCLV (5500) and a classic Lemond Maillot Jaune. I love them both. My latest work in progress is a spine-design Tete de Course.

You can't go wrong with either but they do have differing geometries and riding characteristics. Go with the one that fits and feels the best.

55/Rad
 

David_Durham

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Aug 21, 2004
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55/Rad said:
I ride a Trek OCLV (5500) and a classic Lemond Maillot Jaune. I love them both. ....
55/Rad
Do you ride either in bad weather, or do you use the Trek to avoid rust?
 

55/Rad

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Jan 30, 2004
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David_Durham said:
Do you ride either in bad weather, or do you use the Trek to avoid rust?
I ride a Lemond Poprad (below) specifically for Oregon rain. It too is 853, but both the steelies have been thoroughly frame saved with Weigles.

The Zurich you are thinking about - is it the carbon/steel combo or the older full steel?

Truth is, the geometry of the Lemonds with it's longer top tube suits me very well. But the 5500 is my favorite for now - at least until the TdC is finished.

55/Rad
 

David_Durham

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Aug 21, 2004
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The Zurich is double-butted steel spine with OCLV carbon cockpit.

I'm guessing that rust won't be that big of an issue, but I sure would like some input. I'll be test riding both, and my anticipation is that I'll find things I really like about both. That's why I'm trying to figure out whether the frame/rust issues should concern me given that I have to be honest about how well I'll maintain it. Tell me about Weigles
 

str8shooter

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Jul 15, 2004
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David_Durham said:
Do you ride either in bad weather, or do you use the Trek to avoid rust?
I'm basically a fair weather rider. If I get caught in the rain after I'm out "Oh WEll". The biggest reason for buying the 5000 was the way it fit and the smooth ride. No regrets so far.
 

gixser11

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Sep 5, 2004
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I can't comment on the Trek, but I have an 04 Zurich and I love it. I am 6'3 and the Lemonds are a better fit for taller people (at least that is what I was told, seems to be true). I initially bought the Tourmalet but returned and traded up for the Zurich. Much smoother ride.

Off topic- The Zurich shifted like a dream until I took it in for the 15 hour checkup. Now it is really tough to get into the big front ring(highest gear). And shifts in the lower gear ring are delayed. Very weird, I shift and like 10 seconds later it actually shifts.
 

coastalrider

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Aug 8, 2004
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David_Durham said:
I can't run b/o intermittent back pain, but I've found I can bike. Just went 53mi on my 16y old aluminum DiamondBack mountain bike (averaged 13-14mi/h). It's now time for a road bike. I'd like to keep my bike 10-15y. I like to do fitness road rides and long rides. I won't likely race, but I like the sensation of going fast. I will ride in the rain occasionally, and quite honestly, I probably won't do the best job of keeping my bike cleaned and dry. On the other hand, I need something that won't totally jar my back and is a little forgiving. Can you tell me a little about the rides of these two bikes on long rides? If I get fitted properly, will I notice a difference? How quickly does steel rust if I coat it with something and dry it after rides? If I go down on the Trek, what is the durability of carbon?
I rode a 2000 Zurich until recently until I just purchased a 2000 5500. I have not riden the 5500 to much yet but am very pleased with it so far. The ride is definately smooth. Lemonds do have a longer top tube however with the appropriate stem you can mimic the bike positioning on the Trek. Overall it is like comparing apples and oranges. Both are good just a matter of preference.

Both are great bikes (at least the al steel Zurich Frame). I don't know how the spined bike rides.

Just make sure you get fitted correctly. Go with a store that will swap stems later on if you decide after a while you want a different one.

I dont't think you have to worry about differences in durability. Hope you never go down on either! :)

-Marc