Trek 5500 reviews?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Rivermist, Jun 21, 2004.

  1. Rivermist

    Rivermist Guest

    Am thinking about buying the Trek 5500.

    Anyone have experience with that bike?
     
    Tags:


  2. psycholist

    psycholist Guest

    "Rivermist" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:15GBc.15[email protected]_s01...
    > Am thinking about buying the Trek 5500.
    >
    > Anyone have experience with that bike?
    >


    Nope ... nobody here.

    It's the Toyota Camry of bicycles. Go on a century ride and probably 40% of
    the riders are on Trek 5500s.

    You can't go wrong with a Trek 5500. I've had three. I crashed one and
    another got wiped out when a car hit me. They're light and durable and
    handle well. The ride is stiff, but smooth. Actually, if there's one knock
    on the bike, it's that the ride is a little ... dull. I didn't understand
    what people meant by that until I bought a nice aluminum/carbon frame. It
    just seems livelier and zippier in ways that are hard to define.

    But the Trek 5500 is a very fine bike with a very fine pedigree. It's
    definately a fast bike. It's also a comfortable bike for long rides. And
    lastly, it's backed by Trek who, for the most part, is pretty decent to
    deal with if you have warranty issues.

    Bob C.
     
  3. Larry

    Larry Guest

    I had one for two years. Terrible finish. The clear coat chipped off, it
    went back to Trek and the repainted it for free. Very limited choice in
    colors and finishes. They can't repaint to the original unless it is in the
    same year. The repainted one sucked. Left dirt under the paint, missed spots
    and this paint chipped off. If you like a well finished bike look for
    another brand. I sold the frame cheap went for a better finish. The ride
    quality is OK but kind of soft. Go try other brands. There are quite a few
    that look and ride much better. And remember Lance gets paid to ride Trek.

    "Rivermist" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s01...
    > Am thinking about buying the Trek 5500.
    >
    > Anyone have experience with that bike?
    >
    >
     
  4. psycholist

    psycholist Guest

    "Larry" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s54...
    > I had one for two years. Terrible finish. The clear coat chipped off, it
    > went back to Trek and the repainted it for free. Very limited choice in
    > colors and finishes. They can't repaint to the original unless it is in

    the
    > same year. The repainted one sucked. Left dirt under the paint, missed

    spots
    > and this paint chipped off. If you like a well finished bike look for
    > another brand. I sold the frame cheap went for a better finish. The ride
    > quality is OK but kind of soft. Go try other brands. There are quite a few
    > that look and ride much better. And remember Lance gets paid to ride Trek.
    >
    > "Rivermist" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]_s01...
    > > Am thinking about buying the Trek 5500.
    > >
    > > Anyone have experience with that bike?


    Lance won't ride with it if he can't win with it.

    I'd also say the attention to the finishing process is lacking. I just
    don't care much about that. The bike is a solid performer and the company
    stands behind it.

    One additional point ... relative to many bikes these days, the 5500 is a
    decent value. That's quite relative, but I do believe they offer a lot for
    the money versus many other brands.

    Oh ... one more thing, still. I was with a guy on a ride a couple of weeks
    ago who just got his new Project One 5900 with DA 10 speed. I know it's not
    a 5500, but the paint job could be had for the 5500 as well and it was
    jaw-dropping gorgeous. It was these two shades off blue with swirly
    thingies and it just looked spectacular. It was about the coolest-looking
    bike I've ever seen. Didn't get an up-close inspection, though.

    Bob C.
     
  5. Larry

    Larry Guest

    I think a $4000.00 bike should come with a jaw-dropping paint job without
    having to pay $650.00 more.
    Take a closer look and see what you think. My LBS had a Madone 5.9 with a
    project one finish that the customer refused because of grit under the paint
    and stickers that were 13/4 off from one end to the other. And by the way
    that bike cost $6400.00

    "psycholist" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Larry" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]_s54...
    > > I had one for two years. Terrible finish. The clear coat chipped off, it
    > > went back to Trek and the repainted it for free. Very limited choice in
    > > colors and finishes. They can't repaint to the original unless it is in

    > the
    > > same year. The repainted one sucked. Left dirt under the paint, missed

    > spots
    > > and this paint chipped off. If you like a well finished bike look for
    > > another brand. I sold the frame cheap went for a better finish. The ride
    > > quality is OK but kind of soft. Go try other brands. There are quite a

    few
    > > that look and ride much better. And remember Lance gets paid to ride

    Trek.
    > >
    > > "Rivermist" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]_s01...
    > > > Am thinking about buying the Trek 5500.
    > > >
    > > > Anyone have experience with that bike?

    >
    > Lance won't ride with it if he can't win with it.
    >
    > I'd also say the attention to the finishing process is lacking. I just
    > don't care much about that. The bike is a solid performer and the company
    > stands behind it.
    >
    > One additional point ... relative to many bikes these days, the 5500 is a
    > decent value. That's quite relative, but I do believe they offer a lot

    for
    > the money versus many other brands.
    >
    > Oh ... one more thing, still. I was with a guy on a ride a couple of

    weeks
    > ago who just got his new Project One 5900 with DA 10 speed. I know it's

    not
    > a 5500, but the paint job could be had for the 5500 as well and it was
    > jaw-dropping gorgeous. It was these two shades off blue with swirly
    > thingies and it just looked spectacular. It was about the coolest-looking
    > bike I've ever seen. Didn't get an up-close inspection, though.
    >
    > Bob C.
    >
    >
     
  6. Monty

    Monty Guest

    I had a 5500 and put 18,000 miles on it. I loved the bike. Very
    comfortable and fast.
    This spring I sold the 5500 and bought a 5900. I have 4,800 miles on the
    5900 this season. Same thing, Very comfortable and fast. I have no regrets
    with either bike.

    Both have beautiful finishes! Have a look:
    http://nanandmont.com/ebay/b6.jpg
    http://nanandmont.com/bike/2002/5900-cloud-9.jpg


    "Larry" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s54...
    > I had one for two years. Terrible finish. The clear coat chipped off, it
    > went back to Trek and the repainted it for free. Very limited choice in
    > colors and finishes. They can't repaint to the original unless it is in

    the
    > same year. The repainted one sucked. Left dirt under the paint, missed

    spots
    > and this paint chipped off. If you like a well finished bike look for
    > another brand. I sold the frame cheap went for a better finish. The ride
    > quality is OK but kind of soft. Go try other brands. There are quite a few
    > that look and ride much better. And remember Lance gets paid to ride Trek.
    >
    > "Rivermist" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]_s01...
    > > Am thinking about buying the Trek 5500.
    > >
    > > Anyone have experience with that bike?
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
  7. psycholist

    psycholist Guest

    "Larry" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s53...
    > I think a $4000.00 bike should come with a jaw-dropping paint job without
    > having to pay $650.00 more.
    > Take a closer look and see what you think. My LBS had a Madone 5.9 with a
    > project one finish that the customer refused because of grit under the

    paint
    > and stickers that were 13/4 off from one end to the other. And by the way
    > that bike cost $6400.00
    >
    > "psycholist" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > > "Larry" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]_s54...
    > > > I had one for two years. Terrible finish. The clear coat chipped off,

    it
    > > > went back to Trek and the repainted it for free. Very limited choice

    in
    > > > colors and finishes. They can't repaint to the original unless it is

    in
    > > the
    > > > same year. The repainted one sucked. Left dirt under the paint, missed

    > > spots
    > > > and this paint chipped off. If you like a well finished bike look for
    > > > another brand. I sold the frame cheap went for a better finish. The

    ride
    > > > quality is OK but kind of soft. Go try other brands. There are quite a

    > few
    > > > that look and ride much better. And remember Lance gets paid to ride

    > Trek.
    > > >
    > > > "Rivermist" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]_s01...
    > > > > Am thinking about buying the Trek 5500.
    > > > >
    > > > > Anyone have experience with that bike?

    > >
    > > Lance won't ride with it if he can't win with it.
    > >
    > > I'd also say the attention to the finishing process is lacking. I just
    > > don't care much about that. The bike is a solid performer and the

    company
    > > stands behind it.
    > >
    > > One additional point ... relative to many bikes these days, the 5500 is

    a
    > > decent value. That's quite relative, but I do believe they offer a lot

    > for
    > > the money versus many other brands.
    > >
    > > Oh ... one more thing, still. I was with a guy on a ride a couple of

    > weeks
    > > ago who just got his new Project One 5900 with DA 10 speed. I know it's

    > not
    > > a 5500, but the paint job could be had for the 5500 as well and it was
    > > jaw-dropping gorgeous. It was these two shades off blue with swirly
    > > thingies and it just looked spectacular. It was about the

    coolest-looking
    > > bike I've ever seen. Didn't get an up-close inspection, though.
    > >
    > > Bob C.
    > >


    You paid $4,000 for yours?!!!!??

    Bob C.
     
  8. H. M. Leary

    H. M. Leary Guest

    In article <[email protected]_s01>, "Rivermist" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Am thinking about buying the Trek 5500.
    >
    > Anyone have experience with that bike?
    >
    >


    The 5500 is an OCLV 120 frameset just like the 5200 , which IMNSHO is the best
    buy for the buck.

    The difference is Durace 10s versus Ultegra.

    Take a look at the Calfee Luna Pro for truly custom CF.

    HAND

    --
    ³Freedom Is a Light for Which Many Have Died in Darkness³

    - Tomb of the unknown - American Revolution
     
  9. Hi all. My first post here. I'm looking for some good advice. I'm 6" 2"
    and nearly 300 lbs... but plan on losing about 40 lbs. I have two bikes.
    One is a 1993 Bridgestone G6 (26" wheels") and the other is a Specialized
    ("Limited") Expedition (26" wheels.) I use the Bridgestone for commuting
    and the Expedition for "joy-rides." The problem with the Expedition is that
    due, to the heavy front suspension forks, the bike has no "zip" to it. So
    I'm considering a 3rd bike. My Bridgestone has a chromaly frame, w/o
    suspension forks and I actually prefer the ride -- for long distances at
    least-- to my Specialized. IMO, the aluminum frame of the Expedition makes
    for a less smooth ride than could be attained if it were chromoly. But
    where can one find new bicycle these days w/ a CroMo frame that's in the
    price range I looking at?

    What I'm looking for is a bicyle that has a CroMo frame, is < $500, w/ NO
    front suspension fork (but HAS seat-post suspension) has 700cm wheels, SRAM
    grip shifters, and has handlebars that will allow me to ride in an upright
    position (a must, due to back problems). The bike would be used on a 12
    mile bike path and occasionally on the street. By the way, I'm wondering
    if a 700cm wheel frame is going to be a problem because of my weight? - ( I
    won't be pulling and wheelies or jumping curves)

    I know that Jamis once made an Aragon (at $300) that had a CroMo frame but
    it has been discontinued in favor of aluminum. Bottom line is I simply
    prefer the ride of ChoMo and I'm looking for a bike that different from what
    I already have. Preferably something with some zip to it. Is what I'm
    looking for impossibe, in a new bike, without having it done "custom?" Sure
    would apprecitate some input.

    Thanks
    Glenn
     
  10. > I know that Jamis once made an Aragon (at $300) that had a CroMo frame but
    > it has been discontinued in favor of aluminum. Bottom line is I simply
    > prefer the ride of ChoMo and I'm looking for a bike that different from

    what
    > I already have. Preferably something with some zip to it. Is what I'm
    > looking for impossibe, in a new bike, without having it done "custom?"

    Sure
    > would apprecitate some input.


    In a larger-sized frame, I'm rather surprised you prefer the "ride" of a
    steel frame. Why? Because, due to tubing diameters used on steel frames,
    larger-sized bikes tend to be a bit flexy compared to aluminum. A
    manufacturer *could* get around this, by using larger-diameter tubing, but
    they generally don't due to both the expense of using a special tubeset and
    the added weight. And, as has been often pointed out here, if you want a
    softer ride, just go to a bigger tire.

    At your price range (less than $500), you could start with a bike like the
    TREK 7300FX, make whatever changes you need to, and probably still be within
    your price range.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com


    "Glenn Civello" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi all. My first post here. I'm looking for some good advice. I'm 6"

    2"
    > and nearly 300 lbs... but plan on losing about 40 lbs. I have two bikes.
    > One is a 1993 Bridgestone G6 (26" wheels") and the other is a Specialized
    > ("Limited") Expedition (26" wheels.) I use the Bridgestone for commuting
    > and the Expedition for "joy-rides." The problem with the Expedition is

    that
    > due, to the heavy front suspension forks, the bike has no "zip" to it. So
    > I'm considering a 3rd bike. My Bridgestone has a chromaly frame, w/o
    > suspension forks and I actually prefer the ride -- for long distances at
    > least-- to my Specialized. IMO, the aluminum frame of the Expedition

    makes
    > for a less smooth ride than could be attained if it were chromoly. But
    > where can one find new bicycle these days w/ a CroMo frame that's in the
    > price range I looking at?
    >
    > What I'm looking for is a bicyle that has a CroMo frame, is < $500, w/ NO
    > front suspension fork (but HAS seat-post suspension) has 700cm wheels,

    SRAM
    > grip shifters, and has handlebars that will allow me to ride in an upright
    > position (a must, due to back problems). The bike would be used on a 12
    > mile bike path and occasionally on the street. By the way, I'm

    wondering
    > if a 700cm wheel frame is going to be a problem because of my weight? -

    ( I
    > won't be pulling and wheelies or jumping curves)
    >
    > I know that Jamis once made an Aragon (at $300) that had a CroMo frame but
    > it has been discontinued in favor of aluminum. Bottom line is I simply
    > prefer the ride of ChoMo and I'm looking for a bike that different from

    what
    > I already have. Preferably something with some zip to it. Is what I'm
    > looking for impossibe, in a new bike, without having it done "custom?"

    Sure
    > would apprecitate some input.
    >
    > Thanks
    > Glenn
    >
    >
     
  11. Hello Mike. Thanks for you input. You indicate surprise that I prefer the
    ride of a steel frame. You're spot-on that steel has more flex to it than
    aluminum. And that's why the aluminum-ride is less "forgiving"... every
    road bump and dip gets amplified. I'm using a Brooks B-17 saddle on my
    Bridgestone cromo and have no complaints about comfort. A long trip for me
    would be 10-12 miles, with some moderate hill climbing.... (actually, there
    is one "killer-hill" that I attempt to climb). The aluminum bike has heavy
    suspension forks that are necessary to cushion the stiffness of the aluminum
    ride. I don't find suspension forks necessary w/ a cromo. Of course, I
    would prefer titanium but the price is prohibiting in my case. I do like
    suspension in the seatpost, however. Do you (or anyone) know if there is a
    significant weight difference between that and a non-suspension post?

    Thanks for your recommendation, Mike. Unfortunately the Trek 7300FX has an
    aluminum frame.... darn!



    Original Message:
    > In a larger-sized frame, I'm rather surprised you prefer the "ride" of a
    > steel frame. Why? Because, due to tubing diameters used on steel frames,
    > larger-sized bikes tend to be a bit flexy compared to aluminum. A
    > manufacturer *could* get around this, by using larger-diameter tubing, but
    > they generally don't due to both the expense of using a special tubeset

    and
    > the added weight. And, as has been often pointed out here, if you want a
    > softer ride, just go to a bigger tire.
    >
    > At your price range (less than $500), you could start with a bike like the
    > TREK 7300FX, make whatever changes you need to, and probably still be

    within
    > your price range.
    >
    > --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    > www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
    >
    >
    > "Glenn Civello" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Hi all. My first post here. I'm looking for some good advice. I'm 6"

    > 2"
    > > and nearly 300 lbs... but plan on losing about 40 lbs. I have two

    bikes.
    > > One is a 1993 Bridgestone G6 (26" wheels") and the other is a

    Specialized
    > > ("Limited") Expedition (26" wheels.) I use the Bridgestone for

    commuting
    > > and the Expedition for "joy-rides." The problem with the Expedition is

    > that
    > > due, to the heavy front suspension forks, the bike has no "zip" to it.

    So
    > > I'm considering a 3rd bike. My Bridgestone has a chromaly frame, w/o
    > > suspension forks and I actually prefer the ride -- for long distances

    at
    > > least-- to my Specialized. IMO, the aluminum frame of the Expedition

    > makes
    > > for a less smooth ride than could be attained if it were chromoly. But
    > > where can one find new bicycle these days w/ a CroMo frame that's in the
    > > price range I looking at?
    > >
    > > What I'm looking for is a bicyle that has a CroMo frame, is < $500, w/

    NO
    > > front suspension fork (but HAS seat-post suspension) has 700cm wheels,

    > SRAM
    > > grip shifters, and has handlebars that will allow me to ride in an

    upright
    > > position (a must, due to back problems). The bike would be used on a

    12
    > > mile bike path and occasionally on the street. By the way, I'm

    > wondering
    > > if a 700cm wheel frame is going to be a problem because of my weight? -

    > ( I
    > > won't be pulling and wheelies or jumping curves)
    > >
    > > I know that Jamis once made an Aragon (at $300) that had a CroMo frame

    but
    > > it has been discontinued in favor of aluminum. Bottom line is I simply
    > > prefer the ride of ChoMo and I'm looking for a bike that different from

    > what
    > > I already have. Preferably something with some zip to it. Is what I'm
    > > looking for impossibe, in a new bike, without having it done "custom?"

    > Sure
    > > would apprecitate some input.
    > >
    > > Thanks
    > > Glenn
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
  12. On Wed, 23 Jun 2004 08:21:03 -0400, "Glenn Civello"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Hello Mike. Thanks for you input. You indicate surprise that I prefer the
    >ride of a steel frame. You're spot-on that steel has more flex to it than
    >aluminum.


    I think what Mr. J was getting at was the propensity of the frame to
    flex under heavy pedaling loads. I'm a heavy guy, and when I used to
    ride my old (1980s) Raleigh, I could feel the bike bend a bit as I
    stood up to pedal.....


    >And that's why the aluminum-ride is less "forgiving"... every
    >road bump and dip gets amplified. I'm using a Brooks B-17 saddle on my
    >Bridgestone cromo and have no complaints about comfort. A long trip for me
    >would be 10-12 miles, with some moderate hill climbing.... (actually, there
    >is one "killer-hill" that I attempt to climb). The aluminum bike has heavy
    >suspension forks that are necessary to cushion the stiffness of the aluminum
    >ride. I don't find suspension forks necessary w/ a cromo. Of course, I
    >would prefer titanium but the price is prohibiting in my case. I do like
    >suspension in the seatpost, however. Do you (or anyone) know if there is a
    >significant weight difference between that and a non-suspension post?


    There is. You're adding the complication of all the necessary springs
    and damping to what should otherwise be a fairly simple part.

    Why not go for something totally different? 700C wheels, drop
    handlebars, no suspension. You know, a road bike. Or, to be more
    precise, a tourer. If you must have CrMo steel, the Jamis Aurora will
    fit the bill nicely. I picked mine up for US$450, on clearance; they
    usually go for anywhere between US$500-600. If the price is right, go
    with it.

    Otherwise, go with a road bike, but insist on real wheels--NOT
    stupidlite ones.

    Be sure the bicycle fits, don't be bullied into riding with the bars
    too low & saddle too high, remember that the drops allow for
    *multiple* hand positions with easy access to the brakes--and then go
    for a ride.

    -Luigi




    >
    >Thanks for your recommendation, Mike. Unfortunately the Trek 7300FX has an
    >aluminum frame.... darn!


    Why not ride the bike, and then decide? In the end, it's the bike
    that you're riding, not someone else's opinion.

    >
    >
     
  13. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, luigi12081
    @cox.net says...
    > On Wed, 23 Jun 2004 08:21:03 -0400, "Glenn Civello"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Hello Mike. Thanks for you input. You indicate surprise that I prefer the
    > >ride of a steel frame. You're spot-on that steel has more flex to it than
    > >aluminum.

    >
    > I think what Mr. J was getting at was the propensity of the frame to
    > flex under heavy pedaling loads. I'm a heavy guy, and when I used to
    > ride my old (1980s) Raleigh, I could feel the bike bend a bit as I
    > stood up to pedal.....


    My old Schwinn LeTour from 1979 did the same, but my new (last year)
    Fuji Touring doesn't flex at all under hard pedaling.


    ....

    > Why not go for something totally different? 700C wheels, drop
    > handlebars, no suspension. You know, a road bike. Or, to be more
    > precise, a tourer. If you must have CrMo steel, the Jamis Aurora will
    > fit the bill nicely. I picked mine up for US$450, on clearance; they
    > usually go for anywhere between US$500-600. If the price is right, go
    > with it.


    Very good suggestion.


    > Otherwise, go with a road bike, but insist on real wheels--NOT
    > stupidlite ones.
    >
    > Be sure the bicycle fits, don't be bullied into riding with the bars
    > too low & saddle too high, remember that the drops allow for


    It's even ok to put the bars *above* the saddle level if that's what
    feels best!

    > *multiple* hand positions with easy access to the brakes--and then go
    > for a ride.



    --
    Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in the
    newsgroups if possible).
     
  14. On Wed, 23 Jun 2004 09:41:34 -0400, Luigi de Guzman wrote:
    >
    > Or, to be more precise, a tourer. If you must have CrMo steel, the Jamis
    > Aurora will fit the bill nicely. I picked mine up for US$450, on
    > clearance; they usually go for anywhere between US$500-600. If the
    > price is right, go with it.


    Mine was $730 a few weeks ago. Still a good price and a fabulous bike,
    though, IMO.

    Reid
     
  15. Thank you Luigi. It's good to find out that suspension seatposts add
    significant weight to a bike. Shortly after I bought my Specialized
    Expedition the seatpost wiggled from side to side. Because it was still
    under warrantee, my LBS installed a non-suspension post in its place. This
    made my ride even more stiff... so I wanted it replaced with a suspension
    post. They ordered it, so by next week I should be riding w/ seat-post
    suspension. Again, my Bridgestone doesn't have suspension in either the
    forks or the seatpost; I suppose that's why its lighter in spite of having a
    steel frame.

    Gosh, that Jamis Aurora sure looks sweet... but with the price and the low
    handle bars I wouldn't be able to manage. I slipped a disc in '86 and since
    then reaching and leaning over is uncomfortable. Before that I had no
    problem riding a roadbike...
    =======



    Original message:
    <snip> >> Do you (or anyone) know if there is a significant weight
    difference between that and a non-suspension post?
    >>


    > There is. You're adding the complication of all the necessary springs
    > and damping to what should otherwise be a fairly simple part.
    >
    > Why not go for something totally different? 700C wheels, drop
    > handlebars, no suspension. You know, a road bike. Or, to be more
    > precise, a tourer. If you must have CrMo steel, the Jamis Aurora will
    > fit the bill nicely. I picked mine up for US$450, on clearance; they
    > usually go for anywhere between US$500-600. If the price is right, go
    > with it.
    >
    > Otherwise, go with a road bike, but insist on real wheels--NOT
    > stupidlite ones.
    >
    > Be sure the bicycle fits, don't be bullied into riding with the bars
    > too low & saddle too high, remember that the drops allow for
    > *multiple* hand positions with easy access to the brakes--and then go
    > for a ride.
    >
    > -Luigi
    >
     
  16. The Jamis Aurora is a terrific looking, but I'll have to pass on it for the
    reasons I explained, in my last post, to Luigi. However, you guys got me to
    thinking about Jamis' other bikes... I see that there Coda Sport and Elite
    use cromo frames and when the '05's come out I may be able to get it at a
    good price. Anybody have any experience with either of these bikes?

    http://tinyurl.com/343pk

    http://tinyurl.com/2gjoq

    I'd have to swap-out the handle bars w/ something that has a comfortable
    rise to them.


    "Reid Priedhorsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    > On Wed, 23 Jun 2004 09:41:34 -0400, Luigi de Guzman wrote:
    > >
    > > Or, to be more precise, a tourer. If you must have CrMo steel, the Jamis
    > > Aurora will fit the bill nicely. I picked mine up for US$450, on
    > > clearance; they usually go for anywhere between US$500-600. If the
    > > price is right, go with it.

    >
    > Mine was $730 a few weeks ago. Still a good price and a fabulous bike,
    > though, IMO.
    >
    > Reid
     
  17. On Wed, 23 Jun 2004 11:02:36 -0400, "Glenn Civello"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Thank you Luigi. It's good to find out that suspension seatposts add
    >significant weight to a bike. Shortly after I bought my Specialized
    >Expedition the seatpost wiggled from side to side. Because it was still
    >under warrantee, my LBS installed a non-suspension post in its place. This
    >made my ride even more stiff... so I wanted it replaced with a suspension
    >post. They ordered it, so by next week I should be riding w/ seat-post
    >suspension. Again, my Bridgestone doesn't have suspension in either the
    >forks or the seatpost; I suppose that's why its lighter in spite of having a
    >steel frame.
    >
    >Gosh, that Jamis Aurora sure looks sweet... but with the price and the low
    >handle bars I wouldn't be able to manage. I slipped a disc in '86 and since
    >then reaching and leaning over is uncomfortable. Before that I had no
    >problem riding a roadbike...



    My handlebars are at about the same level as my saddle. I don't lean
    over much, if at all, unless I'm riding deep in the drops.

    The marketing types insist that anything with dropped bars must be
    shown set up for Miguel Indurain, with super-low handlebars. This is
    crap; handlebar height is something that you determine for yourself.
    After all, it isn't Big Mig riding your bike, but you.

    A decent shop should be able to accomodate your desire to have the
    handlebars at around the same level as your saddle.

    As far as price: I admit that I was stupendously lucky on mine, but
    bargains can be had on similar bikes: REI Novara Randonee, Fuji
    Touring, for instance.

    =-Luigi


    >=======
    >
    >
    >
    >Original message:
    ><snip> >> Do you (or anyone) know if there is a significant weight
    >difference between that and a non-suspension post?
    >>>

    >
    >> There is. You're adding the complication of all the necessary springs
    >> and damping to what should otherwise be a fairly simple part.
    >>
    >> Why not go for something totally different? 700C wheels, drop
    >> handlebars, no suspension. You know, a road bike. Or, to be more
    >> precise, a tourer. If you must have CrMo steel, the Jamis Aurora will
    >> fit the bill nicely. I picked mine up for US$450, on clearance; they
    >> usually go for anywhere between US$500-600. If the price is right, go
    >> with it.
    >>
    >> Otherwise, go with a road bike, but insist on real wheels--NOT
    >> stupidlite ones.
    >>
    >> Be sure the bicycle fits, don't be bullied into riding with the bars
    >> too low & saddle too high, remember that the drops allow for
    >> *multiple* hand positions with easy access to the brakes--and then go
    >> for a ride.
    >>
    >> -Luigi
    >>

    >
     

  18. >> >Gosh, that Jamis Aurora sure looks sweet... but with the price and the

    low handle bars I wouldn't be able to manage. I slipped a disc in '86 and
    since
    then reaching and leaning over is uncomfortable. Before that I had no
    problem riding a roadbike... >>>

    >> My handlebars are at about the same level as my saddle. I don't lean

    over much, if at all, unless I'm riding deep in the drops. >>

    > The marketing types insist that anything with dropped bars must be

    shown set up for Miguel Indurain, with super-low handlebars. This is
    crap; handlebar height is something that you determine for yourself.
    After all, it isn't Big Mig riding your bike, but you.>

    I hear you Luigi but w/o trying out the bike I wouldn't take the chance.
    The one bike shop that has the Jamis line won't order it unless I buy it.
    He's got a Coda Elite in stock that looks good to me, but its the frame is
    too small. He's also carry's the Giant line but all are aluminum frames.
    Other bike shops in the area carry Trek, Kona, and Fuji, and Bianche (sp?)
    I'm pretty sure a Coda Elite or Coda Sport would work out well, if I were
    able to change the flat handlebars over to high-rise adjustable stem. I
    don't know if that's possible though (I forgot to ask the bike salesman)
    Also there a used bicycle shop in the area that has a pretty good
    selection... unfortunately, most of the frames are 19 inches or less. I
    need a 21"... 22" would be better. I visit that shop regularly, figuring
    that if I can something with a good frame I could upgrade the rest of the
    parts. No luck so far.... I've been looking since April. Thanks for all
    your help!






    > A decent shop should be able to accomodate your desire to have the
    > handlebars at around the same level as your saddle.
    >
    > As far as price: I admit that I was stupendously lucky on mine, but
    > bargains can be had on similar bikes: REI Novara Randonee, Fuji
    > Touring, for instance.
    >
    > =-Luigi
    >
    >
    > >=======
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >Original message:
    > ><snip> >> Do you (or anyone) know if there is a significant weight
    > >difference between that and a non-suspension post?
    > >>>

    > >
    > >> There is. You're adding the complication of all the necessary springs
    > >> and damping to what should otherwise be a fairly simple part.
    > >>
    > >> Why not go for something totally different? 700C wheels, drop
    > >> handlebars, no suspension. You know, a road bike. Or, to be more
    > >> precise, a tourer. If you must have CrMo steel, the Jamis Aurora will
    > >> fit the bill nicely. I picked mine up for US$450, on clearance; they
    > >> usually go for anywhere between US$500-600. If the price is right, go
    > >> with it.
    > >>
    > >> Otherwise, go with a road bike, but insist on real wheels--NOT
    > >> stupidlite ones.
    > >>
    > >> Be sure the bicycle fits, don't be bullied into riding with the bars
    > >> too low & saddle too high, remember that the drops allow for
    > >> *multiple* hand positions with easy access to the brakes--and then go
    > >> for a ride.
    > >>
    > >> -Luigi
    > >>

    > >

    >
     
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