Trek 8000 pedals too low

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Marco Paganini, Mar 23, 2003.

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  1. Hello All,

    I just bought a used 2000 Trek 8000. The bike is a very welcome departure from my old and heavy
    streel frame GT Saddleback. It climbs wonderfully but the pedals seem too low, meaning that places I
    used to pass without problems (rocks, logs, etc) now require some "thinking" to prevent the pedals
    from hitting the floor (or the obstacle itself). I checked and the crank length is the same (175).
    Does anyone else experience the same problem?

    Regards, Paga
     
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  2. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    Marco Paganini wrote:
    > Hello All,
    >
    > I just bought a used 2000 Trek 8000. The bike is a very welcome departure from my old and heavy
    > streel frame GT Saddleback. It climbs wonderfully but the pedals seem too low, meaning that places
    > I used to pass without problems (rocks, logs, etc) now require some "thinking" to prevent the
    > pedals from hitting the floor (or the obstacle itself). I checked and the crank length is the same
    > (175). Does anyone else experience the same problem?
    >
    > Regards, Paga

    you are supposed to move the pedal out of the way so that the poedal on what ever side your obstacle
    is, the pedal is out of the way. Try passing obstables with pedals at 3/9 or put the pedal closest
    to the rock at 12.

    is, rider error not a bike error.

    penny
     
  3. > I just bought a used 2000 Trek 8000. The bike is a very welcome departure from my old and heavy
    > streel frame GT Saddleback. It climbs wonderfully but the pedals seem too low, meaning that places
    > I used to pass without problems (rocks, logs, etc) now require some "thinking" to prevent the
    > pedals from hitting the floor (or the obstacle itself). I checked and the crank length is the same
    > (175). Does anyone else experience the same problem?

    Its simply a lower bottom bracket height. Deal with it.

    Small Black Dog
     
  4. Penny S. wrote:
    > Marco Paganini wrote:
    >
    >>Hello All,
    >>
    >>I just bought a used 2000 Trek 8000. The bike is a very welcome departure from my old and heavy
    >>streel frame GT Saddleback. It climbs wonderfully but the pedals seem too low, meaning that places
    >>I used to pass without problems (rocks, logs, etc) now require some "thinking" to prevent the
    >>pedals from hitting the floor (or the obstacle itself). I checked and the crank length is the same
    >>(175). Does anyone else experience the same problem?
    >>
    >>Regards, Paga
    >
    >
    > you are supposed to move the pedal out of the way so that the poedal on what ever side your
    > obstacle is, the pedal is out of the way. Try passing obstables with pedals at 3/9 or put the
    > pedal closest to the rock at 12.
    >
    > is, rider error not a bike error.
    >
    > penny
    >
    >

    Its definitely a technique problem, but I'm sure the bike has some to do with it. I rode a
    Specialized Enduro Expert out in AZ, which is known for having a low BB, and I was definitely
    hitting the pedals on stuff more than I should have been. Granted, I was also on flats with running
    shoes (my clipless pedals and shoes were stolen along with a crapload of other stuff a couple days
    before), so that didn't help, but it took me until almost the end of the ride to get used to the
    different BB height. I don't hit stuff too much on my bike, but the stuff I thought I could clear
    with the pedals turned out to be too tall for the enduro.

    Just ride it for a while. Trek Hardtails are pretty standard in terms of geometry. The BB isn't too
    low, and you might find the bike a little more stable because your center of gravity will be a
    couple inches lower. It'll take some time, but it'll be second nature in no time.

    Jon Bond
     
  5. G.T.

    G.T. Guest

    Penny S. wrote:
    > Marco Paganini wrote:
    >
    >>Hello All,
    >>
    >>I just bought a used 2000 Trek 8000. The bike is a very welcome departure from my old and heavy
    >>streel frame GT Saddleback. It climbs wonderfully but the pedals seem too low, meaning that places
    >>I used to pass without problems (rocks, logs, etc) now require some "thinking" to prevent the
    >>pedals from hitting the floor (or the obstacle itself). I checked and the crank length is the same
    >>(175). Does anyone else experience the same problem?
    >>
    >>Regards, Paga
    >
    >
    > you are supposed to move the pedal out of the way so that the poedal on what ever side your
    > obstacle is, the pedal is out of the way. Try passing obstables with pedals at 3/9 or put the
    > pedal closest to the rock at 12.
    >
    > is, rider error not a bike error.
    >

    Did you read what he had to say? He said his previous clearance was fine.

    Unfortunately the bottom bracket on your Trek is lower than your old GT. You'll have to get fatter
    tires, longer front fork if your frame can handle the geometry change, shorter cranks (but I
    wouldn't go shorter than your
    175s), and/or you'll have to adjust your riding style a bit like Penny mentioned.

    Greg

    --
    "Destroy your safe and happy lives before it is too late, the battles we fought were long and hard,
    just not to be consumed by rock n' roll..." - The Mekons
     
  6. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    G.T. wrote:
    > Penny S. wrote:
    >> Marco Paganini wrote:
    >>
    >>> Hello All,
    >>>
    >>> I just bought a used 2000 Trek 8000. The bike is a very welcome departure from my old and heavy
    >>> streel frame GT Saddleback. It climbs wonderfully but the pedals seem too low, meaning that
    >>> places I used to pass without problems (rocks, logs, etc) now require some "thinking" to prevent
    >>> the pedals from hitting the floor (or the obstacle itself). I checked and the crank length is
    >>> the same (175). Does anyone else experience the same problem?
    >>>
    >>> Regards, Paga
    >>
    >>
    >> you are supposed to move the pedal out of the way so that the poedal on what ever side your
    >> obstacle is, the pedal is out of the way. Try passing obstables with pedals at 3/9 or put the
    >> pedal closest to the rock at 12.
    >>
    >> is, rider error not a bike error.
    >>
    >
    > Did you read what he had to say? He said his previous clearance was fine.

    since your are the second one to tell me that I'm some how wrong which is always a possibility
    anyway <g> I guess I did miss something or not get it.

    what ever. I'll' get over it, always do.

    Penny
     
  7. [email protected] (Marco Paganini) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    Thanks a lot for all comments. Like Penny said, I think I'll have to get "used" to it. Just putting
    the pedals at 3/9 won't do. I'll have to decide where the obstacle is and put that side a little bit
    higher. I'm still getting used to the "cage" style clip pedals that came standard with it. For
    someone not used to having his shoes strapped to the pedals, it's a long shot (I've already had a
    few "interesting accidents" because of it). The bike came with brand new clipless pedals, but given
    my lack of ability with the current setup, I wonder if I should even try going clipless... :)

    Again, my thanks to everybody.

    Regards, Paga
     
  8. Ctg

    Ctg Guest

    "Marco Paganini" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > [email protected] (Marco Paganini) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > Thanks a lot for all comments. Like Penny said, I think I'll have to get "used" to it. Just
    > putting the pedals at 3/9 won't do. I'll have to decide where the obstacle is and put that side a
    > little bit higher. I'm still getting used to the "cage" style clip pedals that came standard with
    > it. For someone not used to having his shoes strapped to the pedals, it's a long shot (I've
    > already had a few "interesting accidents" because of it). The bike came with brand new clipless
    > pedals, but given my lack of ability with the current setup, I wonder if I should even try going
    > clipless... :)

    Learning curve with either pedal type. Many people use clipless, fall alot, then say they can't
    imagine riding without them. I'm in that camp. Clipless sucks at first (lots of dumbass falls) then
    becomes great. I rode with toeclips for a year or two as well and I liked those too, but I enjoy
    clipless better, ymmv.

    --
    Chris
    ________________
    www.chrisgroff.com

    >
    > Again, my thanks to everybody.
    >
    > Regards, Paga
     
  9. That's so true on the Specialized Enduro, I'm having the same problem as well. My pedal will ground
    itself sometimes even if I wheelie drop down a kerb. Now I know I'm not the only one having this
    trouble. Heh...

    > I rode a Specialized Enduro Expert out in AZ, which is known for having a low BB, and I was
    > definitely hitting the pedals on stuff more than I should have been. Granted, I was also on flats
    > with running shoes (my clipless pedals and shoes were stolen along with a crapload of other stuff
    > a couple days before), so that didn't help, but it took me until almost the end of the ride to
    > get used to the different BB height. I don't hit stuff too much on my bike, but the stuff I
    > thought I could clear with the pedals turned out to be too tall for the enduro.
     
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