Trek Computer

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Mrvboop55, May 2, 2003.

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  1. Mrvboop55

    Mrvboop55 Guest

    First let me say hi, am new to this group. Now problem at hand. Can anyone help me with a trek
    computer that is about two years old. Battery finally died. But now I can't find directions to reset
    the settings. Anyone know were I can get directions. Have been to trek site and did google search
    but no help. Also no model number on thing.......TIA
     
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  2. In article <[email protected]>, MrVboop55 <[email protected]> wrote:
    >First let me say hi, am new to this group. Now problem at hand. Can anyone help me with a trek
    >computer that is about two years old. Battery finally died. But now I can't find directions to
    >reset the settings. Anyone know were I can get directions. Have been to trek site and did google
    >search but no help. Also no model number on thing.......TIA

    Two suggestions:

    1. Take the battery to Radio Shack.

    2. Ask Trek or a Trek dealer.

    --Paul
     
  3. > First let me say hi, am new to this group. Now problem at hand. Can anyone help me with a trek
    > computer that is about two years old. Battery finally died. But now I can't find directions to
    > reset the settings. Anyone know were I can get directions. Have been to trek site and did
    > google search
    but
    > no help. Also no model number on thing.......TIA

    Which TREK computer?

    The reality, however, is that with a small amount of trial & error it isn't that tough to figure out
    how to set virtually any bike computer. Just push the reset button (almost always a small recessed
    button on the back) for maybe five seconds, and it will usually cycle through it's setup mode. Most
    computers have two buttons on the front; one is a mode button, the other for starting/stopping.
    During setup, one button will be used for changing the value of the setting (wheel size, time of
    day) and the other used to set it and move on to the next function.

    Wheel size is almost always in cm per revolution, easily determined by rolling your wheel out on the
    ground and measuring how far it travels. Use the valve as your marker; start with the valve on the
    floor, and place something on the ground there. Roll through one revolution, place another marker,
    and measure the distance between them. If the computer is asking for a four-digit number, and you
    measure 207.5 cm, the number entered would be 2075. If 3-digit, lop off the least-significant digit
    and round to the closest 3-digit number.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  4. Jon Isaacs

    Jon Isaacs Guest

  5. Mrvboop55

    Mrvboop55 Guest

  6. He should write a book then!

    The Real Lee Casey

    "Jon Isaacs" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >Thank-you, you have been very helpful. I found exactly what I was looking for at the site.
    >
    > Its pretty hard to go wrong sending someone to www.sheldonbrown.com.
    >
    > Jon Isaacs
     
  7. Pete

    Pete Guest

    "The Real Lee Casey" <nosppam,@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > He should write a book then!
    >
    > The Real Lee Casey

    He did. It's just online instead of print.

    Pete
     
  8. Jpfler

    Jpfler Guest

    >"Mike Jacoubowsky" wrote:

    >Wheel size is almost always in cm per revolution, easily determined by rolling your wheel out on
    >the ground and measuring how far it travels. Use the valve as your marker; start with the valve on
    >the floor, and place something on the ground there. Roll through one revolution, place

    >another marker, and measure the distance between them. If the computer is asking for a four-digit
    >number, and you measure 207.5 cm, the number entered would be 2075. If 3-digit, lop off the
    >least-significant digit and round to the

    >closest 3-digit number.

    The above method described by Mike is more accurate than using the number chart listing supplied in
    the instructions that come with the computer, as manufacturer's tire sizing is not standard in the
    industry. I have found that a more accurate measurement can be done if your tire (one with the
    magnet on spokes) is pumped to your normal riding pressure and you have your weight on the bike when
    you roll the bike it's one revolution.

    Jim
     
  9. > The above method described by Mike is more accurate than using the number
    chart
    > listing supplied in the instructions that come with the computer, as manufacturer's tire sizing is
    > not standard in the industry. I have found
    that
    > a more accurate measurement can be done if your tire (one with the magnet
    on
    > spokes) is pumped to your normal riding pressure and you have your weight
    on
    > the bike when you roll the bike it's one revolution.

    For even greater accuracy, go through two revolutions of the tire, and divide the result by two.
    This will help reduce measuring errors.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
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