Trek & Gary Fisher bikes = USA made

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by jesskidden, Mar 15, 2004.

  1. jesskidden

    jesskidden Guest

    I'm interested in getting a hybrid type bike and would
    prefer to buy an American-made product, if possible (yeah, I
    know most of the components are going to be imported). Have
    been told that Trek bikes are made in the US and that Gary
    Fisher bikes are made by Trek (?). (Fisher bikes I'm
    considering are the Utopia/Nirvana/Zebrano/Tibruon series.)

    The websites of both companies are rather vague on the
    question, which usually implies that many or most of their
    products maybe made elsewhere
    (i.e., using terms like "Designed in America", etc.)

    Is there an easy way to tell what bikes are US-made on
    the websites?

    Are the bikes well-marked?

    Any other suggestions?

    (I'm not looking for reasons why I shouldn't buy American or
    why it doesn't matter or trying to get political or jingoistic-
    just an unemployed toolmaker who prefers his dollars go to
    US workers.)

    Thanks a lot.
     
    Tags:


  2. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > I'm interested in getting a hybrid type bike and would
    > prefer to buy an American-made product, if possible (yeah,
    > I know most of the components are going to be imported).
    > Have been told that Trek bikes are made in the US and that
    > Gary Fisher bikes are made by Trek (?). (Fisher bikes I'm
    > considering are the Utopia/Nirvana/Zebrano/Tibruon
    > series.)
    >
    > The websites of both companies are rather vague on the
    > question, which usually implies that many or most of their
    > products maybe made elsewhere
    > (i.e., using terms like "Designed in America", etc.)
    >
    > Is there an easy way to tell what bikes are US-made on the
    > websites?
    >
    > Are the bikes well-marked?
    >
    > Any other suggestions?

    When I was shopping, the Trek dealer told me that their more
    expensive (> $1000) bikes are made in the US (Wisconsin,
    IIRC, though I could be wrong on that), but their cheaper
    ones are made elsewhere in the world. Keep in mind that the
    company is still based in the US, so the profits stay here,
    and most of the office personnel are here.

    --
    Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in
    the newsgroups if possible).
     
  3. zy2238

    zy2238 Guest

    On Mon, 15 Mar 2004 19:54:02 GMT, [email protected] wrote:

    >I'm interested in getting a hybrid type bike and would
    >prefer to buy an American-made product, if possible (yeah,
    >I know most of the components are going to be imported).
    >Have been told that Trek bikes are made in the US and that
    >Gary Fisher bikes are made by Trek (?). (Fisher bikes I'm
    >considering are the Utopia/Nirvana/Zebrano/Tibruon series.)
    >
    >The websites of both companies are rather vague on the
    >question, which usually implies that many or most of their
    >products maybe made elsewhere
    >(i.e., using terms like "Designed in America", etc.)
    >
    >Is there an easy way to tell what bikes are US-made on the
    >websites?
    >
    >Are the bikes well-marked?
    >
    >Any other suggestions?
    >
    >(I'm not looking for reasons why I shouldn't buy American
    >or why it doesn't matter or trying to get political or jingoistic-
    >just an unemployed toolmaker who prefers his dollars go to
    >US workers.)
    >
    >Thanks a lot.

    See:

    http://www.usstuff.com/bikes.htm
     
  4. David Kerber wrote:

    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] says...
    >
    >>I'm interested in getting a hybrid type bike and would
    >>prefer to buy an American-made product, if possible (yeah,
    >>I know most of the components are going to be imported).
    >>Have been told that Trek bikes are made in the US and that
    >>Gary Fisher bikes are made by Trek (?). (Fisher bikes I'm
    >>considering are the Utopia/Nirvana/Zebrano/Tibruon
    >>series.)
    >>
    >>The websites of both companies are rather vague on the
    >>question, which usually implies that many or most of their
    >>products maybe made elsewhere
    >>(i.e., using terms like "Designed in America", etc.)
    >>
    >>Is there an easy way to tell what bikes are US-made on the
    >>websites?
    >>
    >>Are the bikes well-marked?
    >>
    >>Any other suggestions?
    >
    > When I was shopping, the Trek dealer told me that their
    > more expensive (> $1000) bikes are made in the US
    > (Wisconsin, IIRC, though I could be wrong on that), but
    > their cheaper ones are made elsewhere in the world. Keep
    > in mind that the company is still based in the US, so
    > the profits stay here, and most of the office personnel
    > are here.

    I think this is the general case for all "American" bikes.
    The higher end ones are made here (the frames), with cheaper
    models farmed out to Taiwan or China. Componentry is of
    course largely Japanese.

    The Treks are based and made in Wisconsin. Waterford is
    there too and they also build Herons. Cannondale has their
    headquarters in Connecticut but the bikes are produced in
    PA. Independent Fabrication is here in MA.

    How to tell which model is actually built where I do not
    know. Perhaps just ask at the respective web sites.

    SMH
     
  5. Get a Cannondale. All their models are made in PA.
     
  6. TREKs & Gary Fisher bicycles are made both here in the US
    and overseas. It's difficult, if not impossible, to build
    lower-end frames here in the US, due to the astoundingly-
    cheap (yet increasingly-skilled) labor in China. At the
    higher price points, technology can keep the US
    production ahead of the game, and build a better frame
    for a similar price (but it's a moving target, with the
    technology that TREK uses in a domestic frame today
    likely to become the standard way they're built in China
    two years down the road).

    In general, bikes below $700 will have frames produced
    overseas, although final finishing, painting & assembly is
    usually done in the US. Above $700, nearly all frames are
    produced in TREK's Waterloo, WI facility. The plant in
    Whitewater is primarily used for painting & assembly.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles www.ChainReaction.com

    For a given model, you need to look at the label on the
    chainstay. If it says "Made in the USA"
    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I'm interested in getting a hybrid type bike and would
    > prefer to buy an American-made product, if possible (yeah,
    > I know most of the components are going to be imported).
    > Have been told that Trek bikes are made in the US and that
    > Gary Fisher bikes are made by Trek (?). (Fisher bikes I'm
    > considering are the Utopia/Nirvana/Zebrano/Tibruon
    > series.)
    >
    > The websites of both companies are rather vague on the
    > question, which usually implies that many or most of their
    > products maybe made elsewhere
    > (i.e., using terms like "Designed in America", etc.)
    >
    > Is there an easy way to tell what bikes are US-made on the
    > websites?
    >
    > Are the bikes well-marked?
    >
    > Any other suggestions?
    >
    > (I'm not looking for reasons why I shouldn't buy American
    > or why it doesn't matter or trying to get political or jingoistic-
    > just an unemployed toolmaker who prefers his dollars go to
    > US workers.)
    >
    > Thanks a lot.
     
  7. Folks back home (I graduated from UW-Whitewater) are pretty
    ticked off at Trek, according to my family. Looks like Trek
    is laying off everyone at the Whitewater facility, probably
    to ship the jobs overseas.

    "Mike Jacoubowsky/Chain Reaction Bicycles"
    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:D[email protected]...
    > TREKs & Gary Fisher bicycles are made both here in the US
    > and overseas. It's difficult, if not impossible, to build
    > lower-end frames here in the
    US,
    > due to the astoundingly-cheap (yet increasingly-skilled)
    > labor in China.
    At
    > the higher price points, technology can keep the US
    > production ahead of
    the
    > game, and build a better frame for a similar price (but
    > it's a moving target, with the technology that TREK uses
    > in a domestic frame today
    likely
    > to become the standard way they're built in China two
    > years down the
    road).
    >
    > In general, bikes below $700 will have frames produced
    > overseas, although final finishing, painting & assembly is
    > usually done in the US. Above
    $700,
    > nearly all frames are produced in TREK's Waterloo, WI
    > facility. The plant in Whitewater is primarily used for
    > painting & assembly.
    >
    > --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles www.ChainReaction.com
    >
    > For a given model, you need to look at the label on the
    > chainstay. If it says "Made in the USA"
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I'm interested in getting a hybrid type bike and would
    > > prefer to buy an American-made product, if possible
    > > (yeah, I know most of the components are going to be
    > > imported). Have been told that Trek bikes are made in
    > > the US and that Gary Fisher bikes are made by Trek (?).
    > > (Fisher bikes I'm considering are the
    > > Utopia/Nirvana/Zebrano/Tibruon series.)
    > >
    > > The websites of both companies are rather vague on the
    > > question, which usually implies that many or most of
    > > their products maybe made elsewhere
    > > (i.e., using terms like "Designed in America", etc.)
    > >
    > > Is there an easy way to tell what bikes are US-made on
    > > the websites?
    > >
    > > Are the bikes well-marked?
    > >
    > > Any other suggestions?
    > >
    > > (I'm not looking for reasons why I shouldn't buy
    > > American or why it doesn't matter or trying to get
    > > political or jingoistic- just an unemployed toolmaker
    > > who prefers his dollars go to US workers.)
    > >
    > > Thanks a lot.
    >
     
  8. S. Anderson

    S. Anderson Guest

    "Mike Jacoubowsky/Chain Reaction Bicycles" <[email protected]> wrote
    in message news:D[email protected]...
    > TREKs & Gary Fisher bicycles are made both here in the US
    > and overseas. It's difficult, if not impossible, to build
    > lower-end frames here in the
    US,
    > due to the astoundingly-cheap (yet increasingly-skilled)
    > labor in China.

    I've watched, over the last 20 years or so, the migration of
    bicycle production from place to place. In my very early
    career we had bikes manufactured in Europe (Peugeot,
    Raleigh) and Canada/US. A lot of those makers were pushed
    out of the low-end market by cheaper Japanese bikes. Over
    time, they became too expensive as cheaper Taiwanese brands
    became available. From Taiwan they've migrated to China.
    I've already seen bikes manufactured in India. I wonder how
    long they can keep finding cheaper places to build
    bikes..Bangladesh? Mali? The technology transfer is pretty
    good..Japan had great quality, Taiwan learned and became a
    strong maker (Giant). Chinese bikes were absolute rubbish
    early on but they have become the equal of Taiwan in
    quality. Indian bikes right now are also total crap, but
    soon they will equal the Chinese quality. Developed nation
    labour is too expensive for such "menial" tasks.
    Environmental costs, wages, benefits, unions...they simply
    can't compete. Welcome to the Brave New World.

    Cheers,

    Scott..
     
  9. > Folks back home (I graduated from UW-Whitewater) are
    > pretty ticked off at Trek, according to my family. Looks
    > like Trek is laying off everyone at
    the
    > Whitewater facility, probably to ship the jobs overseas.

    I haven't heard anything about it, and hope it's not true.
    But if it is, it's not because they're shipping the jobs
    overseas... the jobs are already there. We created them with
    a new world economy with fewer trade barriers and a desire
    to get everything done as cheaply as possible, even if that
    means buying from huge megastores that make predatory
    demands upon their suppliers and replace decent local jobs
    with those paying less $$$ and fewer benefits (not that I'd
    say anything like that about Wal-Mart...).

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  10. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > "Mike Jacoubowsky/Chain Reaction Bicycles"
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:D[email protected]...
    > > TREKs & Gary Fisher bicycles are made both here in the
    > > US and overseas. It's difficult, if not impossible, to
    > > build lower-end frames here in the
    > US,
    > > due to the astoundingly-cheap (yet increasingly-skilled)
    > > labor in China.
    >
    > I've watched, over the last 20 years or so, the migration
    > of bicycle production from place to place. In my very
    > early career we had bikes manufactured in Europe (Peugeot,
    > Raleigh) and Canada/US. A lot of those makers were pushed
    > out of the low-end market by cheaper Japanese bikes. Over
    > time, they became too expensive as cheaper Taiwanese
    > brands became available. From Taiwan they've migrated to
    > China. I've already seen bikes manufactured in India. I
    > wonder how long they can keep finding cheaper places to
    > build bikes..Bangladesh? Mali? The technology transfer is
    > pretty good..Japan had great quality, Taiwan learned and
    > became a strong maker (Giant). Chinese bikes were absolute
    > rubbish early on but they have become the equal of Taiwan
    > in quality. Indian bikes right now are also total crap,
    > but soon they will equal the Chinese quality. Developed
    > nation labour is too expensive for such "menial" tasks.
    > Environmental costs, wages, benefits, unions...they simply
    > can't compete. Welcome to the Brave New World.

    It won't last forever. There are only a limited number of
    places to move. Once they've all been industrialized, you'll
    see prices start to rise, and jobs migrating back to the
    more industrialized countries where technology over-rides
    labor costs. It's going to take quite a while, though.

    --
    Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in
    the newsgroups if possible).
     
  11. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    Mike Jacoubowsky/Chain Reaction Bicycles wrote:

    > TREKs & Gary Fisher bicycles are made both here in the US
    > and overseas. It's difficult, if not impossible, to build
    > lower-end frames here in the US, due to the astoundingly-
    > cheap (yet increasingly-skilled) labor in China. At the
    > higher price points, technology can keep the US
    > production ahead of the game, and build a better frame
    > for a similar price (but it's a moving target, with the
    > technology that TREK uses in a domestic frame today
    > likely to become the standard way they're built in China
    > two years down the road).

    Absolutely.

    Labor cost is all that is ever mentioned, but there are
    other costs too -- and those are also lower in lower cost
    areas. I say "areas" because the same situation exists
    within the US. For example, this is why BMW built a plant
    in South Carolina instead of southern California, or even
    in Detroit. Everything is cheaper, from the real estate, to
    the cost of building a new factory, to the workers within
    it, to the utility bills. Plus, governments frequently
    offer huge tax advantages, or even partially pick up the
    tab, for new businesses to move into their areas. Companies
    can play this to their advantage. If it's cheaper to build
    a low-tech plant somewhere, it's cheaper to build a high-
    tech one there too.

    Second, increased productivity often requires new techology,
    and new kinds of workers. Sometimes it's easier and cheaper
    to just start over -- with both. In light of the above, that
    often means somewhere else.

    Matt O.
     
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