Trek OCLV 9.9 Pro - durability?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Jesper Rasmusse, Jun 27, 2003.

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  1. Hi.

    I thinking of buying a used '01 Trek OCLV 9.9 Pro. The seller says he's been using the bike for
    offroad winter training and have driven app. 6000 km (3750 miles) on it! According to him the frame
    is in good condition with only the scratches and marks offroad-racing always gives.

    My question is: Does a OCLV-frame last as long as a, say, Alu-frame or does it deteriorate (much)
    with time and (ab)use? Should I have any second thoughts about buying this bike (i.e. frame) or is
    it a safe buy?

    PS: What would be a fair price for a stock '01 bike considering the use? (components more or less
    identical to the new Elite 9.8: <http://www.trekbikes.com/bikes/2003/mountain/elite98.jsp>)
    Please answer in percent of price of a new Elite 9.8 (I'm in Denmark so MSRPs and resell values
    can't be compared directly).

    TIA!

    --
    Regards, Jesper

    Replace invalid with dk if replying by email!
     
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  2. Jim Edgar

    Jim Edgar Guest

    Jesper Rasmussen at [email protected] wrote on 6/27/03 8:18 AM:
    > I thinking of buying a used '01 Trek OCLV 9.9 Pro. The seller says he's been using the bike for
    > offroad winter training and have driven app. 6000 km (3750 miles) on it! According to him the
    > frame is in good condition with only the scratches and marks offroad-racing always gives.
    >

    Winter training off-road is probably the nastiest season for component wear. Mild winters = mud and
    goop through drivetrain and bearing surfaces. Cold winters = salt on the roads? freezing temps, etc.

    If, as you say, the seller was racing it, that will compound the stresses. Clean the frame and look
    for cracking under bright lights.

    > <snipped>

    > PS: What would be a fair price for a stock '01 bike considering the use? (components more or less
    > identical to the new Elite 9.8: <http://www.trekbikes.com/bikes/2003/mountain/elite98.jsp>)
    > Please answer in percent of price of a new Elite 9.8 (I'm in Denmark so MSRPs and resell
    > values can't be compared directly).

    As a starting point, I wouldn't pay more than half of a brand-new model with factory warranty. It
    drops down from there with use/wear/etc.
     
  3. On Fri, 27 Jun 2003 15:49:31 GMT, Jim Edgar wrote:
    >
    > Winter training off-road is probably the nastiest season for component wear. Mild winters = mud
    > and goop through drivetrain and bearing surfaces. Cold winters = salt on the roads? freezing
    > temps, etc.

    We have lots of mud and goop AND salty roads during winter here in Denmark :eek:(

    > If, as you say, the seller was racing it, that will compound the stresses. Clean the frame and
    > look for cracking under bright lights.

    OK - any particular spots to look at? BB/chainstay, headtube or ? (IIRC I read something about
    cracking at the BB/chainstays on early models?)

    > As a starting point, I wouldn't pay more than half of a brand-new model with factory warranty. It
    > drops down from there with use/wear/etc.

    Sounds as a reasonably guideline.

    Thanks!

    --
    /Jesper

    Replace invalid with dk if replying by email!
     
  4. Jim Edgar

    Jim Edgar Guest

    Jesper Rasmussen at [email protected] wrote on 6/27/03 9:40 AM:
    > On Fri, 27 Jun 2003 15:49:31 GMT, Jim Edgar wrote:
    >> If, as you say, the seller was racing it, that will compound the stresses. Clean the frame and
    >> look for cracking under bright lights.
    >
    > OK - any particular spots to look at? BB/chainstay, headtube or ? (IIRC I read something about
    > cracking at the BB/chainstays on early models?)

    Your inclinations are correct:

    Under the headtube as it joins to the downtube - stresses from fork/hard landings

    BB/chainstay - stress from landings, for example

    Also Check frame where the tires look like they might rub - a bit of crud on tightly fitting tires
    can grind quite a bit of carbon fibre quite quickly.

    And you could also - Take wheels off - spin axles by hand - feel for grittiness Look at cogset (on
    rear wheel) are they "shark fins" or relatively symmetrical (there will be "odd" looking cogs by
    design - go look at a brand new cogset first). Look at chainrings for same. While the wheels are
    off, gently lift the chain off the chainrings. Move cranks by hand - feel for grittiness.

    Put it all back together. Tighten everything.

    Grab front brake lever with left hand (or right if it's set up that way) and pull - straddle the
    back wheel and set your chest/stomach on the saddle - put your right hand under the headtube where
    it junctions with the fork. Push yourself forward with your feet and release. Feel for loosness in
    headset cups, feel for clunking in the headtube.

    That's sort of the highlights. Then pay attention for weird noises or actions when you test ride it.

    Hope that helps,

    -- Jim
     
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