Treks are tough afterall

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by mtnclymber, Jul 23, 2003.

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  1. mtnclymber

    mtnclymber Guest

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  2. Michael

    Michael Guest

  3. Slider2699

    Slider2699 Guest

    "Michael" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Or it could mean that Treks break when you crash.

    Only if someone falls on the chainstay, apparently. Perhaps they should ride steel......
     
  4. Henry

    Henry Guest

    My friend Jake had his chainstay (early Trek aluminum frame) snap on a group ride several years ago.

    We were approaching a pretty big downhill when he commented that the rear of his bike felt a little
    mushy--but it didn't appear to be a flat--would we mind taking a look?

    The chainstay had just pulled away from the dropout. REALLY glad we had not made it to the
    downhill yet.

    Trek was cool about it--gave him a choice of a new aluminum frame or a steel frame. He chose steel.

    ie

    "Slider2699" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Michael" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Or it could mean that Treks break when you crash.
    >
    > Only if someone falls on the chainstay, apparently. Perhaps they should
    ride
    > steel......
    >
    >
     
  5. Psycholist

    Psycholist Guest

    I've read your source article and I've been on a Trek OCLV frame for the last 70,000 miles -- but I
    don't buy this story about the cracked chainstay. I've never heard Lance mention it -- nor anyone
    else from the USPS team. I can't believe he wouldn't have changed bikes at that critical stage if he
    was riding a broken frame. This business that he was able to apply steady, even pressure because he
    wasn't forced to respond to attacks is a real load. First, he had to surge to get back on with the
    group, then Mayo attacked twice -- to which Lance had to respond. And he spent significant time out
    of the saddle after he was away alone.

    Does anyone have a picture of the broken frame that shows the break? Does anyone have a quote from
    Lance saying he had a broken chainstay?

    I will say this for Trek, they're great about honoring their warranty when frame problems DO happen
    ... and they do. I'm on my fourth OCLV frame. Frame #1 cracked at the wishbone seat stay --
    apparently such a common problem that they beefed up that area after about 1998 and, just to be
    safe, came up with a decal to put there. They completely rebuilt it and sent it back to me. Frame #2
    just decided to go out of alignment. Don't know why. Nothing could be done about it. Trek sent me a
    brand new USPS frame. Very cool. It was a much-improved frame over the old one -- beefier in the
    seat stay and bottom bracket. Frame #3 died when I got hit by a teenage driver (with cell phone) and
    nearly died. I'm on frame #4 now. Frames 3 and 4 have been fantastic. I'd still be on frame 3 with
    about 50,000 miles were it now for the encounter with a Saturn.

    Bob C.
    P.S. When frame #3 died in the crash, I was going downhill at about 30 mph. The car that turned
    into me was probably going 20 to 25 and the crash would have been head on except that I
    started to try to skid and turn out of the way just before impact and presented my left side
    (broken hip, ankle, pelvis, fractured spine and major laceration of the left leg). My left
    pedal was snapped off and the crank was bent all the way into the rear wheel. There were signs
    of the impact all over the left chainstay -- but it didn't break. Compared to what that frame
    went through, I can't imagine that Iban Mayo's slight body could have broken Lance's
    chainstay. <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:1fyjy6w.1fq5dwx1773i3zN%[email protected]...
    > As if winning after a crash wasn't enough, Lance really did have a broken frame.
    >
    > http://www.bicycling.com/tourdefrance/experts/columns/0,6717,5612,00.htm l
     
  6. "psycholist" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > I've read your source article and I've been on a Trek OCLV frame for the last 70,000 miles -- but
    > I don't buy this story about the cracked chainstay. I've never heard Lance mention it -- nor
    > anyone else from the USPS team. I can't believe he wouldn't have changed bikes at that critical
    > stage if he was riding a broken frame. This business that he was able to apply steady, even
    > pressure because he wasn't forced to respond to attacks is a real load. First, he had to surge to
    > get back on with the group, then Mayo attacked twice -- to which Lance had to respond. And he
    > spent significant time out of the saddle after he was away alone.
    >
    > Does anyone have a picture of the broken frame that shows the break? Does anyone have a quote from
    > Lance saying he had a broken chainstay?
    >
    > I will say this for Trek, they're great about honoring their warranty when frame problems DO
    > happen ... and they do. I'm on my fourth OCLV frame. Frame #1 cracked at the wishbone seat stay --
    > apparently such a common problem that they beefed up that area after about 1998 and, just to be
    > safe, came up with a decal to put there. They completely rebuilt it and sent it back to me. Frame
    > #2 just decided to go out of alignment. Don't know why. Nothing could be done about it. Trek sent
    > me a brand new USPS frame. Very cool. It was a much-improved frame over the old one -- beefier in
    > the seat stay and bottom bracket. Frame
    > #3 died when I got hit by a teenage driver (with cell phone) and nearly
    > died. I'm on frame #4 now. Frames 3 and 4 have been fantastic. I'd still be on frame 3 with about
    > 50,000 miles were it now for the encounter with a Saturn.
    >
    > Bob C.
    > P.S. When frame #3 died in the crash, I was going downhill at about 30 mph. The car that turned
    > into me was probably going 20 to 25 and the crash would have been head on except that I
    > started to try to skid and turn out of the way just before impact and presented my left side
    > (broken hip, ankle, pelvis, fractured spine and major laceration of the left leg). My left
    > pedal was snapped off and the crank was bent all the way into the rear wheel. There were
    > signs of the impact all over the left chainstay -- but it didn't break. Compared to what
    > that frame went through, I can't imagine that Iban Mayo's slight body could have broken
    > Lance's chainstay. <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:1fyjy6w.1fq5dwx1773i3zN%[email protected]...
    >> As if winning after a crash wasn't enough, Lance really did have a broken frame.
    >>
    >> http://www.bicycling.com/tourdefrance/experts/columns/0,6717,5612,00.htm l

    Did you read the article at all? The Trek 5900 OCLV that Lance was riding was a one-off super light
    weight prototype which weighs in at 1000 grams. The Trek tech guy states in the article that this is
    acheived by adding less layers of carbon fiber at certain areas in the bike. Who knows, the
    chainstays could have been one of them. I'm not saying it did or didn't happen. I'm just saying that
    it *is* possible. BTW, most of this information was from Trek. Why would they want to let it be
    known that their frame nearly failed their top rider at possibly *the single most critical moment*
    of his racing career? Doesn't sound like good PR to me. The only reason they would admit to this is
    if they *had* to.

    - Boyd S.
     
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