Trek's Ride-with-Lance giveaway anti-Canadian?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Erik Freitag, Jul 1, 2004.

  1. Erik Freitag

    Erik Freitag Guest

    I was browsing the rules for the contest, because I have no chance of
    winning and would complete embarass myself if I did win, when I came
    across this remarkable text:

    "A potential recipient of the Grand Prize who is Canadian must
    satisfactorily complete a suitable skills test before the prize is
    awarded, or alternate winner [sic] will be selected".

    My question: what have Canadians done (or what can't they do) to
    have Trek single them out this way?

    And if you are Québécois, you can't even play.
     
    Tags:


  2. On Thu, 01 Jul 2004 13:05:11 -0700, Erik Freitag
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I was browsing the rules for the contest, because I have no chance of
    >winning and would complete embarass myself if I did win, when I came
    >across this remarkable text:
    >
    >"A potential recipient of the Grand Prize who is Canadian must
    >satisfactorily complete a suitable skills test before the prize is
    >awarded, or alternate winner [sic] will be selected".


    That satisfies the provision in the law against unlawful games of
    chance or draws. A raffle is a game of chance--but if you subject the
    winner to a trivial test, or question -and-answer, then it's a test of
    skill, and therefore legal.

    I believe similar provisions are on the books in other jurisdictions.

    =-Luigi

    >
    >My question: what have Canadians done (or what can't they do) to
    >have Trek single them out this way?
    >
    >And if you are Québécois, you can't even play.
     
  3. Erik Freitag

    Erik Freitag Guest

    On Thu, 01 Jul 2004 17:15:07 -0400, Luigi de Guzman wrote:

    > On Thu, 01 Jul 2004 13:05:11 -0700, Erik Freitag <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > That satisfies the provision in the law against unlawful games of chance
    > or draws. A raffle is a game of chance--but if you subject the winner to
    > a trivial test, or question -and-answer, then it's a test of skill, and
    > therefore legal.
    >
    > I believe similar provisions are on the books in other jurisdictions.


    Aha. Thanks, I thought maybe Canadians were known wrong-way riders or
    wouldn't be fast enough because of the metric system or something.
     
  4. DRS

    DRS Guest

    "Luigi de Guzman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Thu, 01 Jul 2004 13:05:11 -0700, Erik Freitag
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I was browsing the rules for the contest, because I have no chance of
    >> winning and would complete embarass myself if I did win, when I came
    >> across this remarkable text:
    >>
    >> "A potential recipient of the Grand Prize who is Canadian must
    >> satisfactorily complete a suitable skills test before the prize is
    >> awarded, or alternate winner [sic] will be selected".

    >
    > That satisfies the provision in the law against unlawful games of
    > chance or draws. A raffle is a game of chance--but if you subject the
    > winner to a trivial test, or question -and-answer, then it's a test of
    > skill, and therefore legal.
    >
    > I believe similar provisions are on the books in other jurisdictions.


    Quite right. And the "test" will be along the lines of:

    "OK, to win the *Trek* Ride With Lance give-away, just answer this simple
    question: what brand of bike does Lance ride?"

    and, as you say, it's all perfectly legal.

    --

    A: Top-posters.
    Q: What is the most annoying thing on Usenet?
     
  5. On Thu, 01 Jul 2004 16:15:07 -0400, Luigi de Guzman
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >That satisfies the provision in the law against unlawful games of
    >chance or draws.


    Damn. I was sitting here trying to make up some stupid explanation,
    and here you come up with this perfectly governmental one, saving me
    the trouble.
     
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