Tri-Bikes?

Discussion in 'Triathlon' started by Jim, Apr 16, 2003.

  1. Jim

    Jim Guest

    After much research I bought a Roo Kilo tri-bike 2 weeks ago from a well established bike shop near
    my home. I rode it 3 miles before the derailer completely fell apart. I took the bike back and the
    salespeople there told me they had seen the same problem on other tri-bikes. Apparently the need to
    make components lighter has also made them weaker. So what's my next step? What kind of bike should
    I look at since I need to purchase one ASAP. Thanks.

    -Jim-
     
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  2. David

    David Guest

    >I rode it 3 miles before the derailer completely fell apart. I took the bike back and the
    >salespeople there told me they had seen the same problem on other tri-bikes.

    This makes no sense. What does the bike, or the weight, have to do with the "derailer" falling
    apart?! I have had numerous Tri bikes and road bikes and never had any such problem. there is
    nothing wrong with a Kilo, but it does sound like something is wrong with the shop. Good Luck! David
    Never give up, Be satisfied w/ your best, Do unto others.....
     
  3. John Hardt

    John Hardt Guest

    On 4/16/03 2:28 PM, in article, "Jim" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > After much research I bought a Roo Kilo tri-bike 2 weeks ago from a well established bike shop
    > near my home. I rode it 3 miles before the derailer completely fell apart. I took the bike back
    > and the salespeople there told me they had seen the same problem on other tri-bikes. Apparently
    > the need to make components lighter has also made them weaker. So what's my next step? What kind
    > of bike should I look at since I need to purchase one ASAP. Thanks.
    >
    > -Jim-
    >

    Jim,

    Assuming it was a 2003 model, the derailleurs on this bike are (were) a Shimano 105 in the rear and
    Shimano Tiagra in front (you didn't say which fell apart). While these are at the lower end of
    Shimano's offerings, they are the same components sold on tons of bike models by dozens of
    manufacturers (triathlon, road, and otherwise).

    There is absolutely nothing about these parts that are unique to a triathlon bike and no reason why
    they shouldn't perform fine for (at least) several thousand miles regardless of what kind of frame
    (triathlon, road, whatever) they're attached to.

    I agree with David, the problem here is with the bike shop. They either screwed up the assembly of
    the bike somehow and wanted to blame the parts, or installed defective parts. Either way they're
    dishonest and aren't leveling with you about the issue.

    You said you did a lot of research and determined the Kilo is the bike for you. So, I'd buy another
    Kilo - from another shop. (note that QR didn't make the parts that failed).

    John

    PS: One other possibility is that you're a gorilla and shredded the derailleurs with your immense
    strength - but that's a long shot.
     
  4. Jim K.

    Jim K. Guest

    Thanks for the replies guys.

    "John Hardt" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:BAC3289D.A47%[email protected]...
    > On 4/16/03 2:28 PM, in article, "Jim" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > After much research I bought a Roo Kilo tri-bike 2 weeks ago from a well established bike shop
    > > near my home. I rode it 3 miles before the derailer completely fell apart. I took the bike back
    > > and the salespeople there told me they had seen the same problem on other tri-bikes. Apparently
    > > the need to make components lighter has also made them weaker. So what's my next step? What kind
    > > of bike should I look at since I need to purchase one ASAP. Thanks.
    > >
    > > -Jim-
    > >
    >
    > Jim,
    >
    > Assuming it was a 2003 model, the derailleurs on this bike are (were) a Shimano 105 in the rear
    > and Shimano Tiagra in front (you didn't say which fell apart). While these are at the lower end of
    > Shimano's offerings,
    they
    > are the same components sold on tons of bike models by dozens of manufacturers (triathlon, road,
    > and otherwise).
    >
    > There is absolutely nothing about these parts that are unique to a
    triathlon
    > bike and no reason why they shouldn't perform fine for (at least) several thousand miles
    > regardless of what kind of frame (triathlon, road,
    whatever)
    > they're attached to.
    >
    > I agree with David, the problem here is with the bike shop. They either screwed up the assembly of
    > the bike somehow and wanted to blame the parts, or installed defective parts. Either way they're
    > dishonest and aren't leveling with you about the issue.
    >
    > You said you did a lot of research and determined the Kilo is the bike for you. So, I'd buy
    > another Kilo - from another shop. (note that QR didn't make the parts that failed).
    >
    > John
    >
    > PS: One other possibility is that you're a gorilla and shredded the derailleurs with your immense
    > strength - but that's a long shot.
     
  5. Jim wrote:
    >
    > After much research I bought a Roo Kilo tri-bike 2 weeks ago from a well established bike shop
    > near my home. I rode it 3 miles before the derailer completely fell apart. I took the bike back
    > and the salespeople there told me they had seen the same problem on other tri-bikes. Apparently
    > the need to make components lighter has also made them weaker. So what's my next step? What kind
    > of bike should I look at since I need to purchase one ASAP. Thanks.

    A few more things to consider:

    You may have simply gotten a bad rear derailleur - it happens.

    You may need to learn how to shift better. Derailleurs work better/longer if you lighten up on the
    pedalling pressure while you shift.

    Of course it's possible the bike shop screwed up but it's hard to imagine how - they usually don't
    do much with the derailleur. Tiagra/105 is good, durable stuff.

    -S-
     
  6. Mike Lana

    Mike Lana Guest

    Hi, Did th derailer pull out of the rear drop out or did the derailer fail? I have heard some
    complaints about weak and flexy material in a couple bikes out there bikes because of manufacturers
    attempts to keep weight down. If it pulled out of the drop out, I would never but that bike again. I
    would focus on something more solid in that price range like a cervelo one or fuji aloha. If it did
    fall apart you probably just recieved a faulty derailer. Good luck Mike

    > After much research I bought a Roo Kilo tri-bike 2 weeks ago from a well established bike shop
    > near my home. I rode it 3 miles before the derailer completely fell apart. I took the bike back
    > and the salespeople there told me they had seen the same problem on other tri-bikes.
     
  7. Billx

    Billx Guest

    That sounds incredible. What exactly do you mean by the derailer 'completely fell apart" ? One
    response suggested the derailer is a Shimano
    105. If that's the case I can't picture how it would fall apart, especially after only 3 miles. Not
    saying it didn't happen, just curious for more details.

    Jim wrote in message <[email protected]>...
    >After much research I bought a Roo Kilo tri-bike 2 weeks ago from a well established bike shop near
    >my home. I rode it 3 miles before the derailer completely fell apart. I took the bike back and the
    >salespeople there told me they had seen the same problem on other tri-bikes. Apparently the need to
    >make components lighter has also made them weaker. So what's my next step? What kind of bike should
    >I look at since I need to purchase one ASAP. Thanks.
    >
    > -Jim-
     
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