triathletes - failures at single sports.

Discussion in 'Triathlon' started by Ecce, Mar 21, 2003.

  1. Ecce

    Ecce Guest

    Is it true that triathletes are just failures in other sports, so resort to doing three, so that a
    lower standard in eachsport means that they have a better chance ?

    Discuss the above statement in 400000000000 words or less.

    Winner gets some hair wax, hair spray, aftershave, hair brush, fake tan, eye lash
    curler..............
     
    Tags:


  2. MJuric

    MJuric Guest

    On 10 Mar 2003 17:48:18 -0800, [email protected] (ecce) wrote:

    >Is it true that triathletes are just failures in other sports, so resort to doing three, so that a
    >lower standard in eachsport means that they have a better chance ?
    >
    >Discuss the above statement in 400000000000 words or less.
    >
    >Winner gets some hair wax, hair spray, aftershave, hair brush, fake tan, eye lash
    >curler..............

    This is actually an interesting topic. I think you can actually put triathletes in four
    main groups.

    1) Runners/Cyclist/Swimmers who have peaked in their native sport. I have seen several tri folks who
    were at one time national level competitors. Seems that sdome of these people have peaked and are
    looking for a new challenge.They seem to be willing to trade some of their current fitness in
    their best disipline to compete compentantly in triathlons.

    2) Midpackers - I wouldn't call these people failures by any means as most have had a fairly long
    career in there respective disiplines, but for whatever reason, choice, gentics, time etc they
    never really excelled at any individual sport. After some time they've just become bored being in
    the middle of the pack and want to try something new.

    3) Injury victoms/cross trainers - Currently there is a push towards cross training even for those
    that are concentrating in one disipline. Some find they really like the other two and decide to
    try a tri.

    4) Tri originals - Some just like the idea and start off doing tri's right away.

    ~Matt
     
  3. Mike Tennent

    Mike Tennent Guest

    MJuric wrote:

    >They seem to be willing to trade some of their current fitness in their best disipline to compete
    >compentantly in triathlons.
    >

    Or non-competently. <g>

    I actually switched from short distance running (5K's) where I could occasionally get a 3rd in AG in
    very small local races when no-one else showed up, to tri's - where I don't have any chance at all
    because I'm a lousy swimmer and mediocre on the bike.

    I just enjoy the challenge.

    MikeTennent "IronPenguin"
     
  4. Harold Buck

    Harold Buck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, MJuric wrote:

    > On 10 Mar 2003 17:48:18 -0800, [email protected] (ecce) wrote:
    >
    > >Is it true that triathletes are just failures in other sports, so resort to doing three, so that
    > >a lower standard in eachsport means that they have a better chance ?
    > >

    Um, Sheila Taormina (sp?) was an Olympic gold medalist (1996) in swimming, so I think it would be
    tough to call her a failure in swimming.

    --Harold Buck

    "I used to rock and roll all night, and party every day. Then it was every other day. . . ."

    - Homer J. Simpson
     
  5. Cliff

    Cliff Guest

    Hi - I'd like to make the case for age-groupers who find that triathlon is really a sport for life.
    When one is younger and able to recover faster, then running marathons, etc makes sense, but as we
    age, recovery takes longer. I now find that the mix of swim, bike and run is near optimal for
    continuing an active lifestle while avoiding injury. Maybe this fits into the cross trainer
    catagory, but it is more a forced adaptation than voluntary. I'd prefer to run six times a week, but
    my bones just aren't up to it.

    All this talk of winning and not being able to compete in your native sport is a load of bunk. I am
    a winner when I step up to the starting line. The rest of the race is pure gravey. The key thing is
    to understand why we individually train and compete. Personally, I'm in it for lifetime fitness and
    well-being. I love the sport and hope that others get the same enjoyment and satisfaction out of it
    that I do.

    Can't say I understand the motivation of some of the more recent posters to this newsgroup.

    -- Cliff

    MJuric wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > 1) Runners/Cyclist/Swimmers who have peaked in their native sport. I have seen several tri folks
    > who were at one time national level competitors. Seems that sdome of these people have peaked
    > and are looking for a new challenge.They seem to be willing to trade some of their current
    > fitness in their best disipline to compete compentantly in triathlons.
    >
    > 2) Midpackers - I wouldn't call these people failures by any means as most have had a fairly long
    > career in there respective disiplines, but for whatever reason, choice, gentics, time etc they
    > never really excelled at any individual sport. After some time they've just become bored being
    > in the middle of the pack and want to try something new.
    >
    > 3) Injury victoms/cross trainers - Currently there is a push towards cross training even for those
    > that are concentrating in one disipline. Some find they really like the other two and decide to
    > try a tri.
    >
    > 4) Tri originals - Some just like the idea and start off doing tri's right away.
    >
    > ~Matt
     
  6. MJuric

    MJuric Guest

    On Tue, 11 Mar 2003 11:44:52 -0500, Mike Tennent <[email protected]> wrote:

    >MJuric wrote:
    >
    >>They seem to be willing to trade some of their current fitness in their best disipline to compete
    >>compentantly in triathlons.
    >>
    >
    >Or non-competently. <g>
    >
    >I actually switched from short distance running (5K's) where I could occasionally get a 3rd in AG
    >in very small local races when no-one else showed up, to tri's - where I don't have any chance at
    >all because I'm a lousy swimmer and mediocre on the bike.
    >
    >I just enjoy the challenge.
    >
    >MikeTennent "IronPenguin"
    >
    I guess I fall into the cross training/injury category. I started out running. By no means
    world class or even real good. However I started cross training quite abit even more when
    injured and found I really enjoyed doing the other stuff. So here I am.

    ~Matt
     
  7. Mike Tennent wrote:

    > MJuric wrote:
    >
    >
    >>They seem to be willing to trade some of their current fitness in their best disipline to compete
    >>compentantly in triathlons.
    >>
    >>
    >
    > Or non-competently. <g>
    >
    > I actually switched from short distance running (5K's) where I could occasionally get a 3rd in AG
    > in very small local races when no-one else showed up, to tri's - where I don't have any chance at
    > all because I'm a lousy swimmer and mediocre on the bike.

    I got into duathlon when I found I was equally mediocre at running and cycling which put me in the
    next higher category when I combined the two. A lot of multisporters are much better in one or the
    other and when I'm actually training I'm pretty well balanced.

    JJ
     
  8. MJuric

    MJuric Guest

    On 11 Mar 2003 17:21:04 -0800, [email protected] (Cliff) wrote:

    >Hi - I'd like to make the case for age-groupers who find that triathlon is really a sport for life.
    >When one is younger and able to recover faster, then running marathons, etc makes sense, but as we
    >age, recovery takes longer. I now find that the mix of swim, bike and run is near optimal for
    >continuing an active lifestle while avoiding injury. Maybe this fits into the cross trainer
    >catagory, but it is more a forced adaptation than voluntary. I'd prefer to run six times a week,
    >but my bones just aren't up to it.

    Pretty much same for me. I was running alot and last year ended up spending a good portion
    of the time on the Injured reserve list. I found I could vary my cross training actually get
    a larger volume of workout in and "feel" better in all of the disiplines.

    >
    >All this talk of winning and not being able to compete in your native sport is a load of bunk. I am
    >a winner when I step up to the starting line. The rest of the race is pure gravey. The key thing is
    >to understand why we individually train and compete. Personally, I'm in it for lifetime fitness and
    >well-being. I love the sport and hope that others get the same enjoyment and satisfaction out of it
    >that I do.
    >
    >Can't say I understand the motivation of some of the more recent posters to this newsgroup.
    >
    >-- Cliff
    >
    >MJuric wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >> 1) Runners/Cyclist/Swimmers who have peaked in their native sport. I have seen several tri folks
    >> who were at one time national level competitors. Seems that sdome of these people have peaked
    >> and are looking for a new challenge.They seem to be willing to trade some of their current
    >> fitness in their best disipline to compete compentantly in triathlons.
    >>
    >> 2) Midpackers - I wouldn't call these people failures by any means as most have had a fairly long
    >> career in there respective disiplines, but for whatever reason, choice, gentics, time etc they
    >> never really excelled at any individual sport. After some time they've just become bored being
    >> in the middle of the pack and want to try something new.
    >>
    >> 3) Injury victoms/cross trainers - Currently there is a push towards cross training even for
    >> those that are concentrating in one disipline. Some find they really like the other two and
    >> decide to try a tri.
    >>
    >> 4) Tri originals - Some just like the idea and start off doing tri's right away.
    >>
    >> ~Matt
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>, Cliff <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Hi - I'd like to make the case for age-groupers who find that triathlon is really a sport
    > for life.

    I second that.

    > All this talk of winning and not being able to compete in your native sport is a load of bunk. ...
    > Can't say I understand the motivation of some of the more recent posters to this newsgroup.

    I've never been good enough to be in the winner's circle. In any individual sport. So winning is not
    my motivation. Self improvement and satisfaction is and I'm in better shape and faster than I was 10
    years ago because of triathlon. I've met some people who do not want to enter a tri unless they can
    be a contender. They seem to be worried that they'll finish last and embarass themselves. I think
    they're just making excuses or have a narrow view of accomplishment.

    arthur
    --
    Unix doesn't have a monopoly on good ideas, it just owns most of them.
    - Alan Cox (http://slashdot.org/features/99/03/04/121242.shtml) Arthur Tateishi
    [email protected]
     
  10. Topdog

    Topdog Guest

    [email protected] (Cliff) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi - I'd like to make the case for age-groupers who find that triathlon is really a sport for
    > life. When one is younger and able to recover faster, then running marathons, etc makes sense, but
    > as we age, recovery takes longer. I now find that the mix of swim, bike and run is near optimal
    > for continuing an active lifestle while avoiding injury. Maybe this fits into the cross trainer
    > catagory, but it is more a forced adaptation than voluntary. I'd prefer to run six times a week,
    > but my bones just aren't up to it.
    >
    > All this talk of winning and not being able to compete in your native sport is a load of bunk. I
    > am a winner when I step up to the starting line. The rest of the race is pure gravey. The key
    > thing is to understand why we individually train and compete. Personally, I'm in it for lifetime
    > fitness and well-being. I love the sport and hope that others get the same enjoyment and
    > satisfaction out of it that I do.

    As a masters-level participant, I say HEAR, HEAR!

    I don't ever expect to win a race, and I may never win the master's age group without greatly
    increasing my running ability (doubtful given my knees). However, my primary goal is to get in shape
    and stay in shape. Frankly, it's had to get motivated to simply train for training's sake. Having
    some races to compete in helps quite a bit. I ride with a bunch of guys 20 years my senior. Not only
    can they kick my butt, they can do the same to most 20 yr olds! My wife saw one with his helmet on
    and thought he was in his mid-30's. These guys are my inspiration. I figure that when I reach 60, I
    can be like my parents - 100+ lbs overweight, unable to walk around the block, or like these guys -
    fit, active, looking great, able to do almost anything that they want. That's an easy choice! This,
    for me, is why I'm competing in a nutshell.
     
  11. MJuric

    MJuric Guest

    On 12 Mar 2003 09:55:33 -0800, [email protected] (topdog) wrote:

    >[email protected] (Cliff) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >> Hi - I'd like to make the case for age-groupers who find that triathlon is really a sport for
    >> life. When one is younger and able to recover faster, then running marathons, etc makes sense,
    >> but as we age, recovery takes longer. I now find that the mix of swim, bike and run is near
    >> optimal for continuing an active lifestle while avoiding injury. Maybe this fits into the cross
    >> trainer catagory, but it is more a forced adaptation than voluntary. I'd prefer to run six times
    >> a week, but my bones just aren't up to it.
    >>
    >> All this talk of winning and not being able to compete in your native sport is a load of bunk. I
    >> am a winner when I step up to the starting line. The rest of the race is pure gravey. The key
    >> thing is to understand why we individually train and compete. Personally, I'm in it for lifetime
    >> fitness and well-being. I love the sport and hope that others get the same enjoyment and
    >> satisfaction out of it that I do.
    >
    >As a masters-level participant, I say HEAR, HEAR!
    >
    >I don't ever expect to win a race, and I may never win the master's age group without greatly
    >increasing my running ability (doubtful given my knees). However, my primary goal is to get in
    >shape and stay in shape. Frankly, it's had to get motivated to simply train for training's sake.
    >Having some races to compete in helps quite a bit. I ride with a bunch of guys 20 years my senior.
    >Not only can they kick my butt, they can do the same to most 20 yr olds! My wife saw one with his
    >helmet on and thought he was in his mid-30's. These guys are my inspiration. I figure that when I
    >reach 60, I can be like my parents - 100+ lbs overweight, unable to walk around the block, or like
    >these guys - fit, active, looking great, able to do almost anything that they want. That's an easy
    >choice! This, for me, is why I'm competing in a nutshell.

    It's amazing what kind of an inspiration this can be. It's highly unlikely I'll be
    retiring earlier and I certainly do not want to be house bound when I'm eventually do. I
    look at my parents and my wifes parent who at 60 and 70 have hard time making it from the
    car to the mall. Then I look at some of of the guy's/gal's in the groups I train with that
    at the same age look 15-20 years younger and definately move 15-20 years younger. To me
    it's a no brainer.

    ~Matt
     
  12. Harold Buck

    Harold Buck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, MJuric wrote:

    > >I don't ever expect to win a race, and I may never win the master's age group without greatly
    > >increasing my running ability (doubtful given my knees). However, my primary goal is to get in
    > >shape and stay in shape. Frankly, it's had to get motivated to simply train for training's sake.
    > >Having some races to compete in helps quite a bit. I ride with a bunch of guys 20 years my
    > >senior. Not only can they kick my butt, they can do the same to most 20 yr olds! My wife saw one
    > >with his helmet on and thought he was in his mid-30's. These guys are my inspiration. I figure
    > >that when I reach 60, I can be like my parents - 100+ lbs overweight, unable to walk around the
    > >block, or like these guys - fit, active, looking great, able to do almost anything that they
    > >want. That's an easy choice! This, for me, is why I'm competing in a nutshell.
    >
    > It's amazing what kind of an inspiration this can be. It's highly unlikely I'll be retiring
    > earlier and I certainly do not want to be house bound when I'm eventually do. I look at my
    > parents and my wifes parent who at 60 and 70 have hard time making it from the car to the
    > mall. Then I look at some of of the guy's/gal's in the groups I train with that at the same
    > age look 15-20 years younger and definately move 15-20 years younger. To me it's a no
    > brainer.

    My dad is 80. He's been playing racquetball 3 times a week since about 1960 (substituting tennis in
    the summer). I have a hard time remembering that he's 80, and I'm sure the racquetball has a lot to
    do with it.

    Oh, BTW, there aren't many people that can beat him. He beats the crap out of a lot of 20-something
    guys who think they're going to "tire the old guy out."

    --Harold Buck

    "I used to rock and roll all night, and party every day. Then it was every other day. . . ."

    - Homer J. Simpson

    --Harold Buck

    "I used to rock and roll all night, and party every day. Then it was every other day. . . ."

    - Homer J. Simpson
     
  13. Mike Tennent

    Mike Tennent Guest

    MJuric wrote:

    >
    > It's amazing what kind of an inspiration this can be. It's highly unlikely I'll be retiring
    > earlier and I certainly do not want to be house bound when I'm eventually do. I look at my
    > parents and my wifes parent who at 60 and 70 have hard time making it from the car to the
    > mall. Then I look at some of of the guy's/gal's in the groups I train with that at the same
    > age look 15-20 years younger and definately move 15-20 years younger. To me it's a no
    > brainer.
    >
    >~Matt

    At 55, I guess I'm fast approaching when I'll be one of those inspiring old farts. <g>

    You might find it interesting that one of the things I enjoy most about training and racing is
    associating with the younger crowd. Many of my peers can't walk around the block without keeling
    over and I find very little in common with them. On the other hand, I can hang out with my tri
    buddies, most who are younger by a fair amount, and share common interests and activities.

    Age gracefully? Hell, no. I'm fighting it every inch of the way.

    Mike Tennent "IronPenguin"
     
  14. Bill Reese

    Bill Reese Guest

    Mike Tennent wrote in message <[email protected]t>...

    >
    >At 55, I guess I'm fast approaching when I'll be one of those inspiring old farts. <g>

    Mike-- I'm a bit older than that (2+ AGs) and one thing I find as I get passed on the run is that a
    number of folks tell me things like "I hope when I'm your age I'm still doing this" or just "You are
    an inspiration"--My thought is that I would rather be a bit faster and not be passed than be an
    inspiration --but I guess I'll have to take what I can get! <g>

    >
    >You might find it interesting that one of the things I enjoy most about training and racing is
    >associating with the younger crowd. Many of my peers can't walk around the block without keeling
    >over and I find very little in common with them. On the other hand, I can hang out with my tri
    >buddies, most who are younger by a fair amount, and share common interests and activities.
    >
    >Age gracefully? Hell, no. I'm fighting it every inch of the way.

    AMEN TO THAT!

    Bill
     
  15. MJuric

    MJuric Guest

    On Thu, 13 Mar 2003 10:50:24 -0500, Mike Tennent <[email protected]> wrote:

    >MJuric wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> It's amazing what kind of an inspiration this can be. It's highly unlikely I'll be retiring
    >> earlier and I certainly do not want to be house bound when I'm eventually do. I look at my
    >> parents and my wifes parent who at 60 and 70 have hard time making it from the car to the
    >> mall. Then I look at some of of the guy's/gal's in the groups I train with that at the same
    >> age look 15-20 years younger and definately move 15-20 years younger. To me it's a no
    >> brainer.
    >>
    >>~Matt
    >
    >At 55, I guess I'm fast approaching when I'll be one of those inspiring old farts. <g>
    >
    >You might find it interesting that one of the things I enjoy most about training and racing is
    >associating with the younger crowd. Many of my peers can't walk around the block without keeling
    >over and I find very little in common with them. On the other hand, I can hang out with my tri
    >buddies, most who are younger by a fair amount, and share common interests and activities.

    Aging of the mind is as large a factor as aging of the body. Hanging out in bingo halls,
    watching daytime TV and sitting around complaining about how the weather makes you knees
    hurt is a sure fire way to age the mind. OTOH cruising down road on a clear Saturday
    morning, stopping for breakfast and talking about the fun at the last race has a tendancy of
    not only keeping the body but the mind young too.

    ~Matt

    >
    >Age gracefully? Hell, no. I'm fighting it every inch of the way.
    >
    >Mike Tennent "IronPenguin"
     
  16. Billx

    Billx Guest

    This morning I told a guy who is 9 years younger than me my age and he said "I thought you were my
    age" to which I responded "and I thought you were mine!"

    Bill Reese wrote in message ...
    >
    >Mike Tennent wrote in message
    <[email protected]t>...
    >
    >>
    >>At 55, I guess I'm fast approaching when I'll be one of those inspiring old farts. <g>
    >
    >Mike-- I'm a bit older than that (2+ AGs) and one thing I find as I get passed on the run is that a
    >number of folks tell me things like "I hope when I'm your age I'm still doing this" or just "You
    >are an inspiration"--My thought is that I would rather be a bit faster and not be passed than be an
    >inspiration --but I guess I'll have to take what I can get! <g>
    >
    >>
    >>You might find it interesting that one of the things I enjoy most about training and racing is
    >>associating with the younger crowd. Many of my peers can't walk around the block without keeling
    >>over and I find very little in common with them. On the other hand, I can hang out with my tri
    >>buddies, most who are younger by a fair amount, and share common interests and activities.
    >>
    >>Age gracefully? Hell, no. I'm fighting it every inch of the way.
    >
    >AMEN TO THAT!
    >
    >Bill
    >
     
  17. Mike Tennent

    Mike Tennent Guest

    "Bill Reese" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >My thought is that I would rather be a bit faster and not be passed than be an inspiration --but I
    >guess I'll have to take what I can get! <g>
    >

    LOL. I hear ya.

    It's like when that cute waitress makes over you, but you know it's only because you remind her of
    her grandpa...

    Mike Tennent "IronPenguin"
     
  18. My brethren,

    I, too, was a failure at sports during my days in seminary. It was then that I took up smoking.
    Although I still smoke, I discovered triathlon. When I do a lot of triathlon, I can eat sausage and
    lots of it. Except for today, since it is a Friday during Lent. If you want to smoke my sausage for
    me, let me know. I love smoked sausage.

    Fr. Guido

    Mike Tennent <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]t>...
    > "Bill Reese" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >My thought is that I would rather be a bit faster and not be passed than be an inspiration --but
    > >I guess I'll have to take what I can get! <g>
    > >
    >
    > LOL. I hear ya.
    >
    > It's like when that cute waitress makes over you, but you know it's only because you remind her of
    > her grandpa...
    >
    > Mike Tennent "IronPenguin"
     
  19. Birchrunner

    Birchrunner New Member

    Joined:
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    Well, if anyone really took that question seriously, they would be looking at this matter from a very narrow, and overly judgmental
    perspective, probably with the goal in mind of elevating their own status in the pecking order of athletic competition, if not to anyone else, at least to the satisfation of their the own mind. A better question would be more general and positive: "Why do individuals who start out doing one activity, say running, at some point decide they'd like to compete in a triathalon?" Some of the responses I've read here are right on the mark - and the bottom line is that there are many reasons. For example, I just turned 50. For the last 10 years, I have been primarily, but not exclusively, a non-competitive runner. I run between 50 to 70 miles a week, typically doing a 18-20 mile run every Sunday. In my 20s and early 30s I was an avid non-competitive bicyclist, often on weekends doing a 80 to 100 mile bike ride. I now live in a wonderful location, with very attractive New England country roads, and have rediscoverd my love of bicycling! Since I was a kid, and well into college, right on hrough grad school, I was also an avid swimmer. My first love is running, but the other two are not far behind on my list of favorites. Don't ask me why, but I now have also finally gotten the urge to compete - and the diversity in the triathalon is simply exciting to me! It is true that breaking up the activities makes it appear physically more manageable to me - but I wouldn't dismiss that as a failure of some sort! I don't think that suggestion is fair or even makes sense. On the other hand, a triathalon is just more interesting - actually- it's more sexy!!

    Sorry for rambling so much.

    John
     
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