triathlon with reactive hypoglycemia?

Discussion in 'Triathlon' started by Oya, Nov 16, 2003.

  1. Oya

    Oya Guest

    Hi all,

    I have a reactive hypoglycemia (ie. I crash an hour and change after eating more than a certain
    amount of carbs. Sugar induces the worst crash).

    I just wanted to know if there's anyone else here with hypoglycemia, and what their strategies are
    for dealing with long events. I can't load up on carbs the night before, because I would not wake up
    the next day. I can't eat a big carb filled breakfast 2-4 hours before because I could end up in the
    emergency room. Or just fast asleep. And I am not sure if those sugar filled power gels would make
    me crash half way into the race.

    Rrrrrgh! I hope there's a way to do it, and I won't just have to give up.

    Thanks, Oya
     
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  2. Oya wrote:
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I have a reactive hypoglycemia (ie. I crash an hour and change after eating more than a certain
    > amount of carbs. Sugar induces the worst crash).
    >
    > I just wanted to know if there's anyone else here with hypoglycemia, and what their strategies are
    > for dealing with long events. I can't load up on carbs the night before, because I would not wake
    > up the next day. I can't eat a big carb filled breakfast 2-4 hours before because I could end up
    > in the emergency room. Or just fast asleep. And I am not sure if those sugar filled power gels
    > would make me crash half way into the race.
    >
    > Rrrrrgh! I hope there's a way to do it, and I won't just have to give up.

    I think that the only way for you to find out if, for example, the gels make you crash, is to try
    them in a controlled condition such as training.

    You may want to try other foods that you can eat during exercise: ones with less sugar, ones with
    more sugar etc. Try all of this in training of course, and work out a nutrition plan that you carry
    over into a race.

    You may also find that eating directly before beginning exercise, or very soon after starting will
    limit the effects of the excessive insulin release. Test some different timings in training.

    Good luck.

    --

    Cheers,

    Walter R. Strapps, Ph.D

    "The sheer closeness of our two countries and the intensity of our mutual interaction combined with
    the disparity between us in terms of wealth and power--all these things guarantee there will be
    problems in U.S.-Canadian relations without anybody having to do anything to deliberately worsen the
    situation."

    Robert L. Stanfield, Oct. 28, 1971
     
  3. Oya

    Oya Guest

    Thank you :)

    "Walter R. Strapps" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Oya wrote:
    > > Hi all,
    > >
    > > I have a reactive hypoglycemia (ie. I crash an hour and change after eating more than a certain
    > > amount of carbs. Sugar induces the worst crash).
    > >
    > > I just wanted to know if there's anyone else here with hypoglycemia, and what their strategies
    > > are for dealing with long events. I can't load up on carbs the night before, because I would not
    > > wake up the next day. I can't eat a big carb filled breakfast 2-4 hours before because I could
    > > end up in the emergency room. Or just fast asleep. And I am not sure if those sugar filled power
    > > gels would make me crash half way into the race.
    > >
    > > Rrrrrgh! I hope there's a way to do it, and I won't just have to give up.
    >
    > I think that the only way for you to find out if, for example, the gels make you crash, is to try
    > them in a controlled condition such as training.
    >
    > You may want to try other foods that you can eat during exercise: ones with less sugar, ones with
    > more sugar etc. Try all of this in training of course, and work out a nutrition plan that you
    > carry over into a race.
    >
    > You may also find that eating directly before beginning exercise, or very soon after starting will
    > limit the effects of the excessive insulin release. Test some different timings in training.
    >
    > Good luck.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Walter R. Strapps, Ph.D
    >
    > "The sheer closeness of our two countries and the intensity of our mutual interaction combined
    > with the disparity between us in terms of wealth and power--all these things guarantee there will
    > be problems in U.S.-Canadian relations without anybody having to do anything to deliberately
    > worsen the situation."
    >
    > Robert L. Stanfield, Oct. 28, 1971
     
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