Tricks on A 'Bent?

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by NYC XYZ, Feb 13, 2006.

  1. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    Just curious. I saw some trike ad with this guy doing a Dukes of
    Hazzard kind of thing and was wondering if anyone ever do anything
    "dangerous" on their 'bent (or trikes) -- besides merely being on the
    road, that is....

    If I wasn't already diagnosed with a herniated vetebra I would have
    like to go over a speed bump real fast on my SMGTe...assuming I keep
    the bike in balance on landing, I guess the next thing to do is keep
    myself in the seat and not bounce out!
     
    Tags:


  2. Jeff Wills

    Jeff Wills Guest

    NYC XYZ wrote:
    > Just curious. I saw some trike ad with this guy doing a Dukes of
    > Hazzard kind of thing and was wondering if anyone ever do anything
    > "dangerous" on their 'bent (or trikes) -- besides merely being on the
    > road, that is....
    >


    I recall Biking Bill saying that there was someone riding the X-Games
    half-pipe on a Bikee a couple years ago...

    Jeff
     
  3. Fritz M

    Fritz M Guest

    NYC XYZ wrote:
    > wondering if anyone ever do anything
    > "dangerous" on their 'bent (or trikes) -- besides merely being on the
    > road, that is....


    Is riding a bent any more dangerous than riding DFs? If not, please
    repeat after me:

    "RIDING A BIKE IS NOT A DANGEROUS ACTIVITY."

    Thank you.

    RFM
    http://www.cyclelicio.us/
     
  4. Kurt Fischer

    Kurt Fischer Guest

    NYC XYZ <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Just curious. I saw some trike ad with this guy doing a Dukes of
    > Hazzard kind of thing and was wondering if anyone ever do anything
    > "dangerous" on their 'bent (or trikes) -- besides merely being on the
    > road, that is....


    Perhaps you are looking for something like this:
    http://www.xs4all.nl/~markjan/hurricane/tricks.html


    Videos of jumping, standing on the seat, and so on. Actually I miss the
    disclaimer "Kids, don't try this at home!" ;-)

    Kurt
     
  5. wafflycat

    wafflycat Guest

    "Fritz M" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > NYC XYZ wrote:
    >> wondering if anyone ever do anything
    >> "dangerous" on their 'bent (or trikes) -- besides merely being on the
    >> road, that is....

    >
    > Is riding a bent any more dangerous than riding DFs? If not, please
    > repeat after me:
    >
    > "RIDING A BIKE IS NOT A DANGEROUS ACTIVITY."
    >
    > Thank you.
    >
    > RFM
    > http://www.cyclelicio.us/
    >


    Besides which, I find that when I'm on my 'bent, I'm given far more room and
    courtesy by motorists than when I'm on my 'normal' bike.

    Plus, riding a bike is *not* inherently dangerous.

    Cheers, helen s
     
  6. wafflycat

    wafflycat Guest

    "Fritz M" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > NYC XYZ wrote:
    >> wondering if anyone ever do anything
    >> "dangerous" on their 'bent (or trikes) -- besides merely being on the
    >> road, that is....

    >
    > Is riding a bent any more dangerous than riding DFs? If not, please
    > repeat after me:
    >
    > "RIDING A BIKE IS NOT A DANGEROUS ACTIVITY."
    >
    > Thank you.
    >
    > RFM
    > http://www.cyclelicio.us/
    >


    Besides which, I find that when I'm on my 'bent, I'm given far more room and
    courtesy by motorists than when I'm on my 'normal' bike.

    Plus, riding a bike is *not* inherently dangerous.

    Cheers, helen s
     
  7. Ken C. M.

    Ken C. M. Guest

    NYC XYZ wrote:
    > Just curious. I saw some trike ad with this guy doing a Dukes of
    > Hazzard kind of thing and was wondering if anyone ever do anything
    > "dangerous" on their 'bent (or trikes) -- besides merely being on the
    > road, that is....
    >
    > If I wasn't already diagnosed with a herniated vetebra I would have
    > like to go over a speed bump real fast on my SMGTe...assuming I keep
    > the bike in balance on landing, I guess the next thing to do is keep
    > myself in the seat and not bounce out!
    >

    I have read that 'tricks' on a 'bent where you 'catch air' can lead to
    spinal compression injuries.

    Ken
    --
    You never have the wind with you - either it is against you or you're
    having a good day. ~Daniel Behrman, The Man Who Loved Bicycles

    Homepage: http://kcm-home.tripod.com/
     
  8. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Ken C. M. wrote:

    > I have read that 'tricks' on a 'bent where you 'catch air' can lead to
    > spinal compression injuries.


    I'd think so, but OTOH how is that not true of uprights, skateboards,
    snowboards, high jumping etc.?

    My friendly neighbourhood 'bentmonger has a festive pic in the shop of
    him getting Big Air on an original Streetmachine (as opposed to the GT
    or GTe). Doesn't seem to have affected him (though I have a feeling the
    rear triangle may have bent a bit over repeated incidents...).

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  9. Ken C. M.

    Ken C. M. Guest

    Peter Clinch wrote:
    > Ken C. M. wrote:
    >
    >> I have read that 'tricks' on a 'bent where you 'catch air' can lead to
    >> spinal compression injuries.

    >
    >
    > I'd think so, but OTOH how is that not true of uprights, skateboards,
    > snowboards, high jumping etc.?
    >
    > My friendly neighbourhood 'bentmonger has a festive pic in the shop of
    > him getting Big Air on an original Streetmachine (as opposed to the GT
    > or GTe). Doesn't seem to have affected him (though I have a feeling the
    > rear triangle may have bent a bit over repeated incidents...).
    >
    > Pete.

    From what I remember reading it has something to do with being in the
    seat of a 'bent versus being off the saddle of a df. And it seems to
    make sense to me on a df you can be off the saddle and have your weight
    spread out over the crank arms and handle bars, where as on a bent this
    is more difficult to do, however I have also read about being able shift
    the riders weight between the back of the seat and the crank arms on a bent.

    Ken
    --
    You never have the wind with you - either it is against you or you're
    having a good day. ~Daniel Behrman, The Man Who Loved Bicycles

    Homepage: http://kcm-home.tripod.com/
     
  10. Andy

    Andy Guest

    Peter Clinch wrote:
    > Ken C. M. wrote:
    >
    > > I have read that 'tricks' on a 'bent where you 'catch air' can lead to
    > > spinal compression injuries.

    >
    > I'd think so, but OTOH how is that not true of uprights, skateboards,
    > snowboards, high jumping etc.?


    If you think about those devices/activities they all allow you to
    absorb the shock of landing by flexing your legs.

    Andy
     
  11. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    Sorry, I didn't mean "dangerous" vis-a-vis upwrongs...I meant that
    being out there on the road in anything other than a car is risky in
    itself -- and that's not even counting the ones who INTENTIONALLY drive
    into you, throw stuff at you, etc.



    Fritz M wrote:
    >
    >
    > Is riding a bent any more dangerous than riding DFs? If not, please
    > repeat after me:
    >
    > "RIDING A BIKE IS NOT A DANGEROUS ACTIVITY."
    >
    > Thank you.
    >
    > RFM
    > http://www.cyclelicio.us/
     
  12. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Andy wrote:

    > If you think about those devices/activities they all allow you to
    > absorb the shock of landing by flexing your legs.


    /if/ you get it right. And /if/ you get it right so a suspended 'bent
    can take the shock for you then you'd probably be okay. What I'm saying
    is there is no objectively perfectly safe method of getting Big Air and
    using a 'bent isn't guaranteed to blow it for you either.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  13. Dane Buson

    Dane Buson Guest

    Peter Clinch <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Ken C. M. wrote:
    >
    >> I have read that 'tricks' on a 'bent where you 'catch air' can lead to
    >> spinal compression injuries.

    >
    > I'd think so, but OTOH how is that not true of uprights, skateboards,
    > snowboards, high jumping etc.?


    Because on an upright your spine is not in a direct vertical line (except
    for sit-up-and-beg type bikes). Thus a bump does not cause a direct
    compression of your spine. And for all the above your legs will absorb a
    much larger portion of the shock.

    --
    Dane Buson - [email protected]
    The Official MBA Handbook on business cards:
    Avoid overly pretentious job titles such as "Lord of the Realm, Defender of
    the Faith, Emperor of India" or "Director of Corporate Planning."
     
  14. Kurt Fischer wrote:
    > Perhaps you are looking for something like this:
    > http://www.xs4all.nl/~markjan/hurricane/tricks.html


    I've actually met Mark Jan and can confirm that he's got even better at
    doing crazy stuff. I've seen him drive over speed bumps without hands.
    He regularly drives for longer periods of time without hands...

    > Videos of jumping, standing on the seat, and so on. Actually I miss the
    > disclaimer "Kids, don't try this at home!" ;-)


    Kids, don't try this at home. These are very dangerous tricks to perform
    in your living room. Instead try it on the open road... ;-)

    Arnold.
     
  15. Edward Dolan

    Edward Dolan Guest

    "wafflycat" <w*a*ff£y£cat*@£btco*nn£ect.com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    [...]
    > Besides which, I find that when I'm on my 'bent, I'm given far more room
    > and courtesy by motorists than when I'm on my 'normal' bike.
    >
    > Plus, riding a bike is *not* inherently dangerous.
    >
    > Cheers, helen s


    Poor Helen is out to lunch as always. Just another reason why you do not
    ever want to listen to a woman about anything that does not lie in her field
    of purview. Her field of purview, for those of you who were born yesterday,
    has to do with the kitchen, the nursery and the church. Helen needs to find
    her nature as a woman and stop messing around with men doing manly things.

    The fact is that riding your bike, any kind of a bike, on a busy highway
    without any shoulders and with lots of fast moving traffic is one of the
    most dangerous things you can do. Only those who are bereft of the common
    sense they were born with, like Helen, would ever think otherwise. She also
    thinks it is OK to ride your bike on icy roads even if it means you are
    likely going to be wiped out by motor vehicle sliding right into you.

    Jeez, don't you just hate uppity, aggressive women! The only thing worse are
    passive, mousy men. Helen should model herself on Our Blessed Lady and not
    on the whores of Babylon. Of course, if she is beautiful enough, like fabled
    Helen of Troy, then she can be anyway she wants to be and men will fall all
    over themselves trying to accommodate her. I give you the men of RBM and
    ARBR as an example of the species.

    Regards,

    Ed Dolan the Great - Minnesota
    aka
    Saint Edward the Great - Order of the Perpetual Sorrows - Minnesota
     
  16. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Edward Dolan wrote in part:

    > The fact is that riding your bike, any kind of a bike, on a busy highway
    > without any shoulders and with lots of fast moving traffic is one of the
    > most dangerous things you can do. Only those who are bereft of the common
    > sense they were born with, like Helen, would ever think otherwise.


    Your life must certainly be boring if riding a bike anywhere is "one of
    the most dangerous things" you do. Perhaps *you* are the one that
    should pursue homemaking skills.

    Regards,
    Bob Hunt
     
  17. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    Um...so do I need a helmet?

    ;->



    Arnold Ligtvoet wrote:
    > Kurt Fischer wrote:
    > > Perhaps you are looking for something like this:
    > > http://www.xs4all.nl/~markjan/hurricane/tricks.html

    >
    > I've actually met Mark Jan and can confirm that he's got even better at
    > doing crazy stuff. I've seen him drive over speed bumps without hands.
    > He regularly drives for longer periods of time without hands...
    >
    > > Videos of jumping, standing on the seat, and so on. Actually I miss the
    > > disclaimer "Kids, don't try this at home!" ;-)

    >
    > Kids, don't try this at home. These are very dangerous tricks to perform
    > in your living room. Instead try it on the open road... ;-)
    >
    > Arnold.
     
  18. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    How 'bout on something like the HP Velotechnik SMGTe? The spine isn't
    on a vertical line -- this 'bent seems like a REAL 'bent to me, truly
    reclined with a highly-regarded full-suspension system....

    I'll probably give it a try myself...I went over a speed bump "by
    accident" once, though not fast, and I was bouncing like on a
    trampoline! It was fun, though, which is why I wonder....



    Dane Buson wrote:
    >
    >
    > Because on an upright your spine is not in a direct vertical line (except
    > for sit-up-and-beg type bikes). Thus a bump does not cause a direct
    > compression of your spine. And for all the above your legs will absorb a
    > much larger portion of the shock.
    >
    > --
    > Dane Buson - [email protected]
    > The Official MBA Handbook on business cards:
    > Avoid overly pretentious job titles such as "Lord of the Realm, Defender of
    > the Faith, Emperor of India" or "Director of Corporate Planning."
     
  19. n5hsr

    n5hsr Guest

    "Bob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Edward Dolan wrote in part:
    >
    >> The fact is that riding your bike, any kind of a bike, on a busy highway
    >> without any shoulders and with lots of fast moving traffic is one of the
    >> most dangerous things you can do. Only those who are bereft of the common
    >> sense they were born with, like Helen, would ever think otherwise.

    >
    > Your life must certainly be boring if riding a bike anywhere is "one of
    > the most dangerous things" you do. Perhaps *you* are the one that
    > should pursue homemaking skills.
    >
    > Regards,
    > Bob Hunt
    >


    Well, next spring, as soon as I get a bike I can ride, I'm going to put my
    fate in the hands of suburban drivers for 3 miles of 2 lane road with a
    posted limit of 45. (Ha ha on Chicago speed limits. Depending on where you
    are and how fast the limit is, you have from 0 tolerance (Paletine, Ottawa)
    to 15-20 over (tollways, usually). I've actually hit 90 going with the flow
    of traffic in a 55 zone. . . . On the "45" stretch I've seen anything from
    45 to 60.

    Let Edward Dolan think what he will. It's called making do. . . . We
    used to do a lot more of that, instead of running out to buy the newest,
    brightest, shiniest gewgaw. But I'm not planning any 'tricks', just regular
    riding.

    Charles of Schaumburg
     
  20. Edward Dolan

    Edward Dolan Guest

    "n5hsr" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Bob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> Edward Dolan wrote in part:
    >>
    >>> The fact is that riding your bike, any kind of a bike, on a busy highway
    >>> without any shoulders and with lots of fast moving traffic is one of the
    >>> most dangerous things you can do. Only those who are bereft of the
    >>> common
    >>> sense they were born with, like Helen, would ever think otherwise.

    >>
    >> Your life must certainly be boring if riding a bike anywhere is "one of
    >> the most dangerous things" you do. Perhaps *you* are the one that
    >> should pursue homemaking skills.
    >>
    >> Regards,
    >> Bob Hunt
    >>

    >
    > Well, next spring, as soon as I get a bike I can ride, I'm going to put my
    > fate in the hands of suburban drivers for 3 miles of 2 lane road with a
    > posted limit of 45. (Ha ha on Chicago speed limits. Depending on where
    > you are and how fast the limit is, you have from 0 tolerance (Paletine,
    > Ottawa) to 15-20 over (tollways, usually). I've actually hit 90 going
    > with the flow of traffic in a 55 zone. . . . On the "45" stretch I've
    > seen anything from 45 to 60.
    >
    > Let Edward Dolan think what he will. It's called making do. . . . We
    > used to do a lot more of that, instead of running out to buy the newest,
    > brightest, shiniest gewgaw. But I'm not planning any 'tricks', just
    > regular riding.
    >
    > Charles of Schaumburg


    I have been reading a daily newspaper since I was about 10 years old. I
    especially like to read the offbeat kind of articles about how people die in
    accidents. No one ever thinks they are going to have an accident which will
    kill them, but it happens all the time.

    By riding your bike in a high traffic corridor you are taking a risk. You
    should really ask yourself if it is worth it. Are there no other
    alternatives? If I were you, I would think long and hard before subjecting
    myself to risk. Only the young and foolish do that - and very many of them
    never get to be old and wise like me.

    Regards,

    Ed Dolan the Great - Minnesota
    aka
    Saint Edward the Great - Order of the Perpetual Sorrows - Minnesota
     
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