Tricycles - some questions



D

Dukes909

Guest
I know, its BI-cycles forum, but what is the general opinion of trikes for
adults? Seems like I read they are more dangerous due to tendency to turn
over when taking corners. Is there anything to this?

Also, a "senior" person I know is interested in one had a foot injury where
their heel was crushed (car accident years ago) and is reluctant to get on a
regular bike for fear of having to put greater weight down on this injured
foot when coming to a stop, dismounting etc. Seems to me like a trike would
require similar forces, possibly more due to the greater weight in the back
of the bike (trike)?

Cheers!
Duke
 
T

ThreeLeggedDog

Guest
On Mon, 7 Nov 2005 10:25:04 -0600, "Dukes909"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>I know, its BI-cycles forum, but what is the general opinion of trikes for
>adults? Seems like I read they are more dangerous due to tendency to turn
>over when taking corners. Is there anything to this?
>
>Also, a "senior" person I know is interested in one had a foot injury where
>their heel was crushed (car accident years ago) and is reluctant to get on a
>regular bike for fear of having to put greater weight down on this injured
>foot when coming to a stop, dismounting etc. Seems to me like a trike would
>require similar forces, possibly more due to the greater weight in the back
>of the bike (trike)?
>
>Cheers!
>Duke
>
>

Aren't there some recumbents with a handcrank system?

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Dukes909 wrote:
> I know, its BI-cycles forum, but what is the general opinion of trikes for
> adults? Seems like I read they are more dangerous due to tendency to turn
> over when taking corners. Is there anything to this?
>
> Also, a "senior" person I know is interested in one had a foot injury where
> their heel was crushed (car accident years ago) and is reluctant to get on a
> regular bike for fear of having to put greater weight down on this injured
> foot when coming to a stop, dismounting etc. Seems to me like a trike would
> require similar forces, possibly more due to the greater weight in the back
> of the bike (trike)?
>
> Cheers!
> Duke


I've never riden a trike (well, since I was 5 yrs old), though I once
tried a quad, but it would appear to me that there would be no extra
pressure on the foot at all assuming the rider had hand brakes. They
would just coast to a stop and dismount, probably similar to getting
off a kitchen or bar stool or stepping down off a porch. Heck they
could sit there while they hauled out a cane or something.

I have read where cornering is different with a trike but not
necessarily more dangerous. It seemed more that a bicyclist just had to
adjust riding style to a trike.
John Kane, Kingston ON Canada
 
B

buckyllama

Guest
There are recumbent trikes which may address your concerns. They have
low-centers of gravity which makes them hard to tip and keeps the rider
low which makes dismounting similar to climbing out of a low-chair
(akward for other reasons but unlikely to injure a foot).

The drawbacks are that a low seating position makes for poor
visibality, and they tend to be quite expensive. Any trike furthur
will be more diffucult to transport and somewhat heavier than an
equivalent bicycle.
 
D

DD

Guest
Dukes909 wrote:
> I know, its BI-cycles forum, but what is the general opinion of trikes for
> adults? Seems like I read they are more dangerous due to tendency to turn
> over when taking corners. Is there anything to this?
>


Just to complicate your query there are many different trikes about.
Trikes may be in the configuration of 'tadpole' (2 wheels forward, 1
rear) or 'delta' (1 forward, 2 rear).
Then there are the recumbent and 'adult' or 'upright' trikes and many
variations between.

IMO the recumbent trikes are better designed and suited for cornering
and general handling and unless you are talking about a true racing
trike most upright trikes are made for consumers who are semi-retired,
want to try to get fit, try this option for various reasons of infirmity
then soon after give it up for the nursing home. But that's just my
opinion. I have seen may 'adult' trikes that get sold to retirees, get
ridden a few times then sold off near new. A few just keep going and
going. Because of this market most 'adult' trikes are being churned out
cheap, heavy and difficult to maintain and most owners have little
experience in maintaining the unusual braking and drive systems that
seem to be coming out lately. I have seen mudguards held on by a screw
that eventually works loose and into the wheel the guard goes. I have
seen weird drum brake systems on a common shaft that are held together
by a couple of retaining screws and need weekly readjustment (for a
regular rider) that requires flipping the heavy trike on its side just
to get at the brake shell. So I suggest that when you look for a
suitable trike you also ask about maintenance issues.
 
L

Leo Lichtman

Guest
"Dukes909" wrote: (clip) Seems like I read they are more dangerous due to
tendency to turn over when taking corners. Is there anything to
this?(clip)
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
If you tried to race a trike against a bike, there might be a problem due to
the inability of the trike to lean in the corners. The chances are a
"senior" person will be riding more sedately, and this would not be a
problem.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
(clip) is reluctant to get on a regular bike for fear of having to put
greater weight down on this injured foot when coming to a stop, dismounting
etc. (clip)
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
There might be a justified concern that a fall to the side with the injured
foot would create a sharp impact. Since such a fall is extremely unlikely
on a trike, I'd say go for it. I see no need for a recumbent--and I think
it would be harder to dismount than a regular trike. Older people have a
hard time standing up from very low seats.
 
Y

Yannik

Guest
"Dukes909" <[email protected]> schreef in bericht
news:[email protected]
> what is the general opinion of trikes for adults? Seems like I read they
> are more dangerous due to tendency to turn over when taking corners. Is
> there anything to this?
> Also, a "senior" person I know is interested in one had a foot injury
> where their heel was crushed (car accident years ago) and is reluctant to
> get on a regular bike for fear of having to put greater weight down on
> this injured foot when coming to a stop, dismounting etc. Seems to me
> like a trike would require similar forces, possibly more due to the
> greater weight in the back of the bike (trike)?
> Cheers!
> Duke


I have a disabled friend that rides a tricycle, old fashioned model, as high
as a normal bike and with the 2 wheels on the back. He only tiped over once
when a car drove him in to the grass on the side of the road. He gos as fast
as he can get with the bike and can corner verry well. I also rode it and it
holds the road quite well. It is heavy, but comfortable. We did lots of Km
together, he on the Kynast, i on a normal bike...
google for 'kynast dreirad'
there are more modern trikes
http://www.utopia-fahrrad.de/ look for utopia phoenix dreirad
http://www.hase-bikes.com/ens/news/ verry good and with special
adaptatoins possible for all kinds of disabilities

in America there are lots of trikes manufacturers if i may beleve the
websites.

Yannik
 
Racing Trikes are British specialty, there used to be conversion kits
to switch
your regular bike to a trike for winter use.

George Longstaff makes superb racing trikes, I have ridden one and the
handling
is very good, some racing trikes can be quite a handful. There are also
tandem racing trikes.

<http://www.longstaffcycles.co.uk/longstaff/channels/longstaffs_engineering_left/trikes_ttrikes/index.html>
 
M

Mike Kruger

Guest
"DD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]

The original poster may want to post his query on the
alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent newsgroup, where there are likely to be a lot of
trike users.
>
> ... most upright trikes are made for consumers who are semi-retired, want
> to try to get fit, try this option for various reasons of infirmity then
> soon after give it up for the nursing home. But that's just my opinion.
> <snip>


Probably a lot of validity to this, but I do have a counterexample. There's
a woman in our neighborhood who did a lot of utility bicycling all her life,
but was no longer able to do so due to balance issues. Her family got her
one of those trikes you criticize. I fixed a flat for her and so I did get a
chance to look at the bike and it was heavy with low end components.

On the other hand, she rides it around the neighborhood extensively and is
is great shape for a woman who had her 80th birthday some time ago. Perhaps
aided by this regular exercise, she's mentally sharp. The last time I saw
her she was riding to the grocery (about a 4 mile round trip) to pick up
some eggs for breakfast, at 6 a.m. So these things do work for some
people.
 
R

Rich

Guest
Dukes909 wrote:
> I know, its BI-cycles forum, but what is the general opinion of trikes for
> adults?


Tadpole trikes are lots of fun. If there's a recumbant shop in your
area you might be able to try one out.

Although I'd think you still need to put a fair amount of pressure on
your foot when pedaling, although not the heel.

And they are expensive.

Rich
 
S

Steve McDonald

Guest
If you want to go all the way into the best and fastest
bicycle/tricycles on the road, look into quadraped recumbent tricycles.
They have both hand and foot cranks and allow you to put more of your
whole body's power into them. They can be an exercise machine beyond
compare. If you've had hard workouts on a Schwinn AirDyne stationary
bike, you know how much more an arm and leg system can develop your
cardio-vascular abilities. A good one with the right components could
allow you to outrun the fastest leg-cranked upright bike. Some have
sophisticated dual front wheel steering geometry that improves cornering
and safety.

Greenspeed in Australia makes some and regularly exports them all
over the world. There has been a builder in Colorado who made them and
perhaps still does. They are highly specialized machines and only a few
make or sell them and they are expensive. Check Search under either
recumbent or quadraped tricycles and find what's available. I used to
make some fiberglass components for a local builder of them (no longer
in business, unfortunately) and got to take one out occasionally. I
still have the molds for a large front-end fairing, a chainguard and a
streamlined cargo box for them. I believe many people would want one,
if they tried it out and experienced the speed and physical
exhileration. I think the cost is the main reason you don't see more of
them.

Steve McDonald
 
R

Ryan Cousineau

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"[email protected]" <[email protected]>
wrote:

> Dukes909 wrote:
> > I know, its BI-cycles forum, but what is the general opinion of trikes for
> > adults? Seems like I read they are more dangerous due to tendency to turn
> > over when taking corners. Is there anything to this?
> >
> > Also, a "senior" person I know is interested in one had a foot injury where
> > their heel was crushed (car accident years ago) and is reluctant to get on a
> > regular bike for fear of having to put greater weight down on this injured
> > foot when coming to a stop, dismounting etc. Seems to me like a trike would
> > require similar forces, possibly more due to the greater weight in the back
> > of the bike (trike)?
> >
> > Cheers!
> > Duke

>
> I've never riden a trike (well, since I was 5 yrs old), though I once
> tried a quad, but it would appear to me that there would be no extra
> pressure on the foot at all assuming the rider had hand brakes. They
> would just coast to a stop and dismount, probably similar to getting
> off a kitchen or bar stool or stepping down off a porch. Heck they
> could sit there while they hauled out a cane or something.
>
> I have read where cornering is different with a trike but not
> necessarily more dangerous. It seemed more that a bicyclist just had to
> adjust riding style to a trike.
> John Kane, Kingston ON Canada


The maximum cornering speed of an upright adult trike is much lower than
a bicycle's, and they corner differently, tending to lift their inside
wheel as cornering speeds rise.

I have not ridden a trike, but I did spend a summer riding around on a
motorcycle sidecar, including one notorious incident in which I flipped
the poor thing.

For most of the people who would consider an adult trike, the cornering
limitations are no problem whatsoever, because they will be riding
slowly.

You don't have to put your foot down when you stop a trike, and
dismounting is independent of any need to keep the trike upright.

--
Ryan Cousineau [email protected] http://www.wiredcola.com/
"I don't want kids who are thinking about going into mathematics
to think that they have to take drugs to succeed." -Paul Erdos
 
H

HANDSOME PRINCE

Guest
Ryan Cousineau wrote:

>The maximum cornering speed of an upright adult trike is much lower than
>a bicycle's, and they corner differently, tending to lift their inside
>wheel as cornering speeds rise.
>SNIP
>For most of the people who would consider an adult trike, the cornering
>limitations are no problem whatsoever, because they will be riding
>slowly.
>
>


Cornering at speed is possible [and habitually done] by "hanging out"
much in the way yacht sailors do. Loop your leg around the top tube and
go for it!!
 
V

Violet Tigress

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"Dukes909" <[email protected]> wrote:

Seems like I read they are more dangerous due to tendency to turn
> over when taking corners. Is there anything to this?


Trikes are a good thing. People who otherwise couldn't ride a bike, will
probably be able to ride a trike.
I wish trikes were more common so it would be easier to find someone who
knows about tricycle gearing.

Well they are heavier. A bicycle doesn't tip when you corner because it
has 2 inline wheels. Trikes do because they have 3 wheels in a triangle
shape, so you need to slow as you.Trikes are more stable when sitting
straight, but not so nmuch when trying to take a corner too fast.


> regular bike for fear of having to put greater weight down on this injured
> foot when coming to a stop, dismounting etc.


I have only ever ridden on the back of a tandem bike so I can't speak to
the weight required. My trike- & most that I've seen have a step through
design so mounting & dismount is easier.Mine also has a hand brake & a
coaster brake.
 
R

Rita

Guest
On Tue, 08 Nov 2005 09:49:52 -0800, Violet Tigress <[email protected]>
wrote:

>In article <[email protected]>,
> "Dukes909" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> Seems like I read they are more dangerous due to tendency to turn
>> over when taking corners. Is there anything to this?

>
>Trikes are a good thing. People who otherwise couldn't ride a bike, will
>probably be able to ride a trike.
>I wish trikes were more common so it would be easier to find someone who
>knows about tricycle gearing.
>
>Well they are heavier. A bicycle doesn't tip when you corner because it
>has 2 inline wheels. Trikes do because they have 3 wheels in a triangle
>shape, so you need to slow as you.Trikes are more stable when sitting
>straight, but not so nmuch when trying to take a corner too fast.
>
>
>> regular bike for fear of having to put greater weight down on this injured
>> foot when coming to a stop, dismounting etc.

>
>I have only ever ridden on the back of a tandem bike so I can't speak to
>the weight required. My trike- & most that I've seen have a step through
>design so mounting & dismount is easier.Mine also has a hand brake & a
>coaster brake.


I just popped into this group to ask a question or two about adult trikes
and was pleased to find a discussion going.

I am 75 years old -- know how to ride a bike and used to own them but
not for many years now and I think I would be foolish to start in again now
as a fall could have very unpleasant results.

I'm moving to Pacific Beach in San Diego shortly and thought about an
adult trike to go a few blocks to and from shopping for food and to ride
along the boardwalk at the beach. I don't own a car. While I enjoy
walking, an adult trike would allow me to carry home packages and also
to go further up and down the coast than I could on foot. I think it may
be the perfect neighborhood for an adult trike.

I don't think I'd take any corners fast enough to have a problem:)

I'd really like to try one out before buying one, though. Does anyone know
if bike shops carry these? I've seen a lot of places on the net where one
can order one, but I'd prefer to buy locally if I could.

All comments appreciated.
 
J

John McCaskill

Guest
Dukes909 wrote:
> I know, its BI-cycles forum, but what is the general opinion of trikes for
> adults? Seems like I read they are more dangerous due to tendency to turn
> over when taking corners. Is there anything to this?
>
> Also, a "senior" person I know is interested in one had a foot injury where
> their heel was crushed (car accident years ago) and is reluctant to get on a
> regular bike for fear of having to put greater weight down on this injured
> foot when coming to a stop, dismounting etc. Seems to me like a trike would
> require similar forces, possibly more due to the greater weight in the back
> of the bike (trike)?
>
> Cheers!
> Duke


I would suggest that you take a look at the Sun EZ-3 designed by
Easyracers, but built and distributed by Sun bicycles.

http://www.easyracers.com/ez_3.htm

or

http://www.sunbicycles.com/03/html_04/recumbents/ez3_sx.html

I do not have this, but my wife and I have a different Sun bicycle, and
two Easyracer bicycles and like them very much. The store that we got
her Sun bicycle at also had the EZ-3 trike as well.

While it is considered a recumbent, its seat is not very reclined, or
low to the ground and is easy to get on and off of.

Regards,

John McCaskill
 
V

Violet Tigress

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
Rita <[email protected]> wrote:

> I'd really like to try one out before buying one, though. Does anyone know
> if bike shops carry these? I've seen a lot of places on the net where one
> can order one, but I'd prefer to buy locally if I could.

********
Most stores I've seen don't, but a few do. The place I got my newest one
only ever has one in stock.
 

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