trike attachment?

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by supabonbon, Jul 22, 2004.

  1. supabonbon

    supabonbon Guest

    I purchased a Schwinn cruiser for my mom a couple years ago. She's
    never owned a bicycle and never learned to ride one. I've prodded, but
    at this point it ain't gonna happen with a regular two wheeler --
    she's too scared to crash.
    So I want to set her up with a trike, something like one of these:

    http://www.waltscycle.com/trikes.htm

    However, I've already got the Schwinn cruiser. The trikes I've seen
    appear to be a regular frame with a two-wheel unit bolted into the
    rear frame dropouts. Can anybody point me in a direction to buy just
    the unit and not the whole bike?

    Thanks.

    /s
     
    Tags:


  2. ["Followup-To:" header set to alt.mountain-bike.] On 2004-07-22,
    supabonbon penned:
    > I purchased a Schwinn cruiser for my mom a couple years ago. She's
    > never owned a bicycle and never learned to ride one. I've prodded, but
    > at this point it ain't gonna happen with a regular two wheeler --
    > she's too scared to crash. So I want to set her up with a trike,
    > something like one of these:
    >
    > http://www.waltscycle.com/trikes.htm
    >
    > However, I've already got the Schwinn cruiser. The trikes I've seen
    > appear to be a regular frame with a two-wheel unit bolted into the
    > rear frame dropouts. Can anybody point me in a direction to buy just
    > the unit and not the whole bike?
    >


    I have no idea, but I just have to ask -- what's up with the pics of the
    guy using the trike? His knees are bent for the whole pedal stroke, it
    looks like. Ouch!

    --
    monique

    "Get a bicycle. You will not regret it, if you live."
    -- Mark Twain
     
  3. supaB says:

    >I purchased a Schwinn cruiser for my mom a couple years ago. She's
    >never owned a bicycle and never learned to ride one. I've prodded, but
    >at this point it ain't gonna happen with a regular two wheeler --
    >she's too scared to crash.
    >So I want to set her up with a trike, something like one of these:
    >
    >http://www.waltscycle.com/trikes.htm
    >
    >However, I've already got the Schwinn cruiser. The trikes I've seen
    >appear to be a regular frame with a two-wheel unit bolted into the
    >rear frame dropouts. Can anybody point me in a direction to buy just
    >the unit and not the whole bike?
    >
    >Thanks.


    Training wheels?

    Steve "seriously..."
     
  4. MattB

    MattB Guest

    Stephen Baker wrote:
    > supaB says:
    >
    >> I purchased a Schwinn cruiser for my mom a couple years ago. She's
    >> never owned a bicycle and never learned to ride one. I've prodded,
    >> but at this point it ain't gonna happen with a regular two wheeler --
    >> she's too scared to crash.
    >> So I want to set her up with a trike, something like one of these:
    >>
    >> http://www.waltscycle.com/trikes.htm
    >>
    >> However, I've already got the Schwinn cruiser. The trikes I've seen
    >> appear to be a regular frame with a two-wheel unit bolted into the
    >> rear frame dropouts. Can anybody point me in a direction to buy just
    >> the unit and not the whole bike?
    >>
    >> Thanks.

    >
    > Training wheels?
    >
    > Steve "seriously..."


    I was thinking the same thing. Maybe she'd even decide to take them off one
    day if she started feeling comfortable.

    I like the looks of this one:
    http://www.waltscycle.com/images/bikes/revivedx.jpg
    That would make a sweet townie!

    Matt
     
  5. On Thu, 22 Jul 2004 14:26:02 -0600, "Monique Y. Mudama"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >["Followup-To:" header set to alt.mountain-bike.] On 2004-07-22,
    >supabonbon penned:
    >> I purchased a Schwinn cruiser for my mom a couple years ago. She's
    >> never owned a bicycle and never learned to ride one. I've prodded, but
    >> at this point it ain't gonna happen with a regular two wheeler --
    >> she's too scared to crash. So I want to set her up with a trike,
    >> something like one of these:
    >>
    >> http://www.waltscycle.com/trikes.htm
    >>
    >> However, I've already got the Schwinn cruiser. The trikes I've seen
    >> appear to be a regular frame with a two-wheel unit bolted into the
    >> rear frame dropouts. Can anybody point me in a direction to buy just
    >> the unit and not the whole bike?
    >>

    >
    >I have no idea, but I just have to ask -- what's up with the pics of the
    >guy using the trike? His knees are bent for the whole pedal stroke, it
    >looks like. Ouch!


    That's because he's too scared to set his saddle at the proper level,
    since that would mean being unable to touch the ground at all times.

    -Luigi
     
  6. BB

    BB Guest

    On Thu, 22 Jul 2004 17:12:29 -0400, Luigi de Guzman wrote:

    >>I have no idea, but I just have to ask -- what's up with the pics of the
    >>guy using the trike? His knees are bent for the whole pedal stroke, it
    >>looks like. Ouch!

    >
    > That's because he's too scared to set his saddle at the proper level,
    > since that would mean being unable to touch the ground at all times.


    Touch the ground, to what...keep from falling over?

    --
    -BB-
    To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
     
  7. Jeff Wills

    Jeff Wills Guest

    [email protected] (supabonbon) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I purchased a Schwinn cruiser for my mom a couple years ago. She's
    > never owned a bicycle and never learned to ride one. I've prodded, but
    > at this point it ain't gonna happen with a regular two wheeler --
    > she's too scared to crash.
    > So I want to set her up with a trike, something like one of these:
    >
    > http://www.waltscycle.com/trikes.htm
    >
    > However, I've already got the Schwinn cruiser. The trikes I've seen
    > appear to be a regular frame with a two-wheel unit bolted into the
    > rear frame dropouts. Can anybody point me in a direction to buy just
    > the unit and not the whole bike?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > /s


    Sheesh- some people can't even answer a simple question without going
    off on an irrelevant tangent.

    Anyway- Steve, trike conversions are sold by a few bike shops here and
    there. Since you don't say where you are, I can't refer you to a
    specific shop.
    I plugged "bike trike conversion" into Google and found these:
    http://www.web.net/freedex/Trike Conversion.htm
    http://www.megalowrider.com/Item/F9901.htm
    http://www.masterlowrider.shoppingcartsplus.com/catalog/item/422441/135896.htm

    The conversion housing and associated parts are also available from
    J&B Importers- but there doesn't appear to be a complete kit listed.
    You'll have to talk to a knowledgable dealer to get all the parts.

    Jeff
     
  8. In article <[email protected]>,
    "MattB" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Stephen Baker wrote:
    > > supaB says:
    > >
    > >> I purchased a Schwinn cruiser for my mom a couple years ago. She's
    > >> never owned a bicycle and never learned to ride one. I've prodded,
    > >> but at this point it ain't gonna happen with a regular two wheeler --
    > >> she's too scared to crash.
    > >> So I want to set her up with a trike, something like one of these:
    > >>
    > >> http://www.waltscycle.com/trikes.htm
    > >>
    > >> However, I've already got the Schwinn cruiser. The trikes I've seen
    > >> appear to be a regular frame with a two-wheel unit bolted into the
    > >> rear frame dropouts. Can anybody point me in a direction to buy just
    > >> the unit and not the whole bike?


    http://www.bikecare.co.uk/tribike.html

    But that seems rather pricey.

    http://www.brandsonsale.com/low-rider-bicycle-295-200.html

    Still $200 plus atrocious shipping.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.wiredcola.com
    President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  9. JD

    JD Guest

    [email protected] (supabonbon) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I purchased a Schwinn cruiser for my mom a couple years ago. She's
    > never owned a bicycle and never learned to ride one. I've prodded, but
    > at this point it ain't gonna happen with a regular two wheeler --
    > she's too scared to crash.
    > So I want to set her up with a trike, something like one of these:
    >
    > http://www.waltscycle.com/trikes.htm
    >
    > However, I've already got the Schwinn cruiser. The trikes I've seen
    > appear to be a regular frame with a two-wheel unit bolted into the
    > rear frame dropouts. Can anybody point me in a direction to buy just
    > the unit and not the whole bike?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > /s


    Try these dudes: http://www.lovelylowrider.com

    Last time I checked their website out, they had a
    trike conversion for a 20" that you could probably
    convert to use 26" wheels on.

    If not, let me know and I'll ask a local shop here who
    does custom conversions for handicapped people. He'll
    give me a quote that will be reasonable for something
    like that.

    JD
     
  10. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On 22 Jul 2004 21:29:34 -0700, [email protected] (Jeff Wills) wrote:

    >Anyway- Steve, trike conversions are sold by a few bike shops here and
    >there. Since you don't say where you are, I can't refer you to a
    >specific shop.
    >I plugged "bike trike conversion" into Google and found these:
    >http://www.web.net/freedex/Trike Conversion.htm
    >http://www.megalowrider.com/Item/F9901.htm
    >http://www.masterlowrider.shoppingcartsplus.com/catalog/item/422441/135896.htm
    >
    >The conversion housing and associated parts are also available from
    >J&B Importers- but there doesn't appear to be a complete kit listed.
    >You'll have to talk to a knowledgable dealer to get all the parts.


    One consideration to keep in mind; the cheaper kits generally are set
    up to drive only one of the rear wheels, and while that works, it's
    not necessarily as good as using an axle with a differential that
    drives both wheels. One-wheel-drive is, however, vastly preferred
    over a straight axle that drives both wheels; this is not a safe setup
    for a trike, as it makes steering very dodgy...and downright
    impossible at times.

    I'd ask about the type of system used before buying any kit.
    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  11. I seem to recall that the UK Cycling mag "Cycling Plus" reviewed just
    such an animal last year, sometime around their Giro d'Italia issue.

    Sorry I can't be more helpful.

    -Luigi
     
  12. BB

    BB Guest

    On Thu, 22 Jul 2004 23:00:43 -0700, Ryan Cousineau wrote:

    > Still $200 plus atrocious shipping.


    Those links pretty much validated what I already expected: that it would
    cost almost as much to convert a bike as it would to buy a new one. Since
    everything's bolt-on, it probably doesn't have the strength of an
    un-cobbled version. And there is likely little or no warranty, so if
    something breaks its a $300 throw-away.

    Plus you lose that sweet-looking basket. :)

    --
    -BB-
    To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
     
  13. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Werehatrack wrote:

    > One consideration to keep in mind; the cheaper kits generally are set
    > up to drive only one of the rear wheels, and while that works, it's
    > not necessarily as good as using an axle with a differential that
    > drives both wheels. One-wheel-drive is, however, vastly preferred
    > over a straight axle that drives both wheels; this is not a safe setup
    > for a trike, as it makes steering very dodgy...and downright
    > impossible at times....


    Most purpose built delta trikes drive only one rear wheel. A
    differential adds significant cost and complexity.

    --
    Tom Sherman – Quad City Area
     
  14. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Mon, 26 Jul 2004 00:20:16 -0500, Tom Sherman
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Werehatrack wrote:
    >
    >> One consideration to keep in mind; the cheaper kits generally are set
    >> up to drive only one of the rear wheels, and while that works, it's
    >> not necessarily as good as using an axle with a differential that
    >> drives both wheels. One-wheel-drive is, however, vastly preferred
    >> over a straight axle that drives both wheels; this is not a safe setup
    >> for a trike, as it makes steering very dodgy...and downright
    >> impossible at times....

    >
    >Most purpose built delta trikes drive only one rear wheel. A
    >differential adds significant cost and complexity.


    It also adds another drawback; unless the diff is equipped with a slip
    brake (in automotive apps, this is called "posi-traction") the
    effectiveness of the drive will be completely lost when *either* rear
    wheel lifts off the road. With one-side-drive, you only lose drive
    effectiveness when the driving wheel lifts. There are reasons to
    prefer each of these, but when cost is taken into account, the
    one-siders tend to win. I had a one-sider as a delivery vehicle back
    in the early '70s; I don't miss it.
    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  15. On Mon, 26 Jul 2004 16:26:36 GMT, Werehatrack
    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    <[email protected]>:

    >in automotive apps, this is called "posi-traction"


    And there was I thinking it was called a limited slip differential :)

    Guy
    --
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at Washington University
     
  16. Chalo

    Chalo Guest

    [email protected] (supabonbon) wrote:
    >
    > I purchased a Schwinn cruiser for my mom a couple years ago. She's
    > never owned a bicycle and never learned to ride one. I've prodded, but
    > at this point it ain't gonna happen with a regular two wheeler --
    > she's too scared to crash.
    > So I want to set her up with a trike,


    What you and she may not know is that a trike is WAY more crash-prone
    than a bike, and that's especially true of trikes that are adapted
    from bikes. They tip to the outside of turns, jacknife, barrel-roll,
    and do all sorts of other unruly things of which a bicycle is
    generally incapable. To my way of thinking, that is one of a trike's
    advantages over a bike. You have lots more ways to crash without ever
    even going fast.

    For your mom, though, it is apt to be a scary experience that "proves"
    to her what a deathtrap a bicycle must be. She'll give up the trike
    and become even more determined never to try a bike.

    If she must go on all threes, she had better use a recumbent trike,
    which places the C of G low enough to ride without undue peril.

    http://www.wagondepot.com/joyrider.html
    http://www.wagondepot.com/fun-cycle.html
    http://www.sunbicycles.com/03/html_04/recumbents/ez3_sx.html

    Such machines are not a lot of bike for the money, though. She'll
    have a better time if she relinquishes her weenitude and learns to
    ride on two wheels.

    Chalo Colina
     
  17. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Mon, 26 Jul 2004 22:57:26 +0100, "Just zis Guy, you know?"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Mon, 26 Jul 2004 16:26:36 GMT, Werehatrack
    ><[email protected]> wrote in message
    ><[email protected]>:
    >
    >>in automotive apps, this is called "posi-traction"

    >
    >And there was I thinking it was called a limited slip differential :)


    It is, if you have the time, but if you're really in a hurry it's just
    "posi". (Car racing fanatics are in a hurry a lot.)
    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  18. Werehatrack says:

    >>And there was I thinking it was called a limited slip differential :)

    >
    >It is, if you have the time, but if you're really in a hurry it's just
    >"posi". (Car racing fanatics are in a hurry a lot.)


    It used to be just a simple "LSD" back in the old days in the UK. Woulda had
    Dannie V stumped... ;-)

    Steve
     
  19. supabonbon

    supabonbon Guest

    [email protected]ospam (Stephen Baker) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > supaB says:
    >
    > >I purchased a Schwinn cruiser for my mom a couple years ago. She's
    > >never owned a bicycle and never learned to ride one. I've prodded, but
    > >at this point it ain't gonna happen with a regular two wheeler --
    > >she's too scared to crash.
    > >So I want to set her up with a trike, something like one of these:
    > >
    > >http://www.waltscycle.com/trikes.htm
    > >
    > >However, I've already got the Schwinn cruiser. The trikes I've seen
    > >appear to be a regular frame with a two-wheel unit bolted into the
    > >rear frame dropouts. Can anybody point me in a direction to buy just
    > >the unit and not the whole bike?
    > >
    > >Thanks.

    >
    > Training wheels?
    >
    > Steve "seriously..."


    I actually did try that. Training wheels are great when you're 50
    pounds riding a bike with 20" wheels. They don't work with larger
    bikes and heavier riders. I put a pair of Walds on (yes, made for 24"
    wheels) and the metal bent out without resistance.
    /s
     
  20. supabonbon

    supabonbon Guest

    [email protected] (JD) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > [email protected] (supabonbon) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > I purchased a Schwinn cruiser for my mom a couple years ago. She's
    > > never owned a bicycle and never learned to ride one. I've prodded, but
    > > at this point it ain't gonna happen with a regular two wheeler --
    > > she's too scared to crash.
    > > So I want to set her up with a trike, something like one of these:
    > >
    > > http://www.waltscycle.com/trikes.htm
    > >
    > > However, I've already got the Schwinn cruiser. The trikes I've seen
    > > appear to be a regular frame with a two-wheel unit bolted into the
    > > rear frame dropouts. Can anybody point me in a direction to buy just
    > > the unit and not the whole bike?
    > >
    > > Thanks.
    > >
    > > /s

    >
    > Try these dudes: http://www.lovelylowrider.com
    >
    > Last time I checked their website out, they had a
    > trike conversion for a 20" that you could probably
    > convert to use 26" wheels on.
    >
    > If not, let me know and I'll ask a local shop here who
    > does custom conversions for handicapped people. He'll
    > give me a quote that will be reasonable for something
    > like that.
    >
    > JD


    Dizzamn! Those things are insane. New plan: sell the Schwinn, buy mom
    Chopper Trike B with a furry purple hat.

    /s
     
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