Trip Report - Blairadam Forest

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Brian, Aug 19, 2004.

  1. Brian

    Brian Guest

    11 Mile cycle around Blairadam Forest today.

    Very enjoyable, starting to become a lot more confident on my Claud Butler
    Cape Wrath, although I'm probably still slowing down too much on descents.

    GPS Tracklog:

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v298/BrianInnes/blairadam.jpg

    Only problem was on the return route my rear derailleur starting doing
    ghost shifts. Oh, and the front brake squeels which is amplified by the
    front shock!

    Good days riding though - some photos to follow.

    regards

    --
    Brian
     
    Tags:


  2. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Brian
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > 11 Mile cycle around Blairadam Forest today.
    >
    > Very enjoyable, starting to become a lot more confident on my Claud
    > Butler Cape Wrath, although I'm probably still slowing down too much
    > on descents.
    >
    > GPS Tracklog:
    >
    > http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v298/BrianInnes/blairadam.jpg
    >
    > Only problem was on the return route my rear derailleur starting doing
    > ghost shifts.


    Don't worry about this - a bit of stretch in new cables is normal. If
    you haven't yet had the free six-week checkover that most good bike
    shops offer, it will be fixed at this. Alternatively, put the bike on a
    stand or hang it from the ceiling; change gear (pedalling) to set the
    chain on the middle ring at the front and a middle-ish cog at the back;
    and turn the adjuster through which the control cable enters the rear
    deraileur until the deraileur cage is perfectly aligned with the cog.
    It's probable that you will at least initially have to adjust
    counter-clockwise. It may help to pedal as you adjust; the chain will
    be quietest when perfectly adjusted.

    > Oh, and the front brake squeels which is amplified by
    > the front shock!


    Clean the braking surface of the disk or rim with meths. If you have V
    brakes, the problem may also be toe-in of the blocks. The rear end of
    the brake shoes (nearest the back of the bike) should be slightly
    closer to the rim than the front end. Finally, some brake block
    compounds just do squeal. Provided the brakes stop you smoothly and
    reliably without juddering, you may just need to put up with it.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; in faecibus sapiens rheum propagabit
     
  3. Get your'sell up too Auchtermuchty ... up by the Deer Farm .. some good
    trails there



    "Brian" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > 11 Mile cycle around Blairadam Forest today.
    >
    > Very enjoyable, starting to become a lot more confident on my Claud Butler
    > Cape Wrath, although I'm probably still slowing down too much on descents.
    >
    > GPS Tracklog:
    >
    > http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v298/BrianInnes/blairadam.jpg
    >
    > Only problem was on the return route my rear derailleur starting doing
    > ghost shifts. Oh, and the front brake squeels which is amplified by the
    > front shock!
    >
    > Good days riding though - some photos to follow.
    >
    > regards
    >
    > --
    > Brian
     
  4. Brian

    Brian Guest

    Simon Brooke <[email protected]> wrote in news:268fv1-shm.ln1
    @gododdin.internal.jasmine.org.uk:


    >
    > Don't worry about this - a bit of stretch in new cables is normal. If
    > you haven't yet had the free six-week checkover that most good bike
    > shops offer, it will be fixed at this. Alternatively, put the bike on a
    > stand or hang it from the ceiling; change gear (pedalling) to set the
    > chain on the middle ring at the front and a middle-ish cog at the back;
    > and turn the adjuster through which the control cable enters the rear
    > deraileur until the deraileur cage is perfectly aligned with the cog.
    > It's probable that you will at least initially have to adjust
    > counter-clockwise. It may help to pedal as you adjust; the chain will
    > be quietest when perfectly adjusted.


    Think I've seen the problem. As I was cleaning the bike up a little I saw
    that one of the links on the chain has almost opened up - seems the chain
    rivet has worked its way loose, only half of the chain link is attatched...

    Time to phone the bike shop - shouldn't have to be getting a new chain on a
    1 week old bike!
     
  5. On 20 Aug 2004 15:08:56 GMT, Brian wrote:


    >
    > Time to phone the bike shop - shouldn't have to be getting a new chain on a
    > 1 week old bike!


    It happens. It happened to me (well, after 4 weeks probably).
    --
    Michael MacClancy
    Random putdown - "He has Van Gogh's ear for music." - Billy Wilder
    www.macclancy.demon.co.uk
    www.macclancy.co.uk
     
  6. Brian

    Brian Guest

    Michael MacClancy <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On 20 Aug 2004 15:08:56 GMT, Brian wrote:
    >
    >
    >>
    >> Time to phone the bike shop - shouldn't have to be getting a new
    >> chain on a 1 week old bike!

    >
    > It happens. It happened to me (well, after 4 weeks probably).


    True, still rather annoying though - anyway, phoned the shop, said they
    would sort it, so I'll take the bike along first thing (and purchase a
    spare chain too!)

    --
    Brian
     
  7. Brian

    Brian Guest

    Brian <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:


    >
    > True, still rather annoying though - anyway, phoned the shop, said they
    > would sort it, so I'll take the bike along first thing (and purchase a
    > spare chain too!)
    >


    Oh, got the bike sorted, they removed the bad link - seems to be OK now.

    --
    Brian
     
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