Triple Crank

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Tou, Jun 4, 2003.

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  1. Tou

    Tou Guest

    I am considering buying either a Fuji Professional or a Trek 2300. I noticed one of the principle
    differences is the trek has a triple crank and the Fuji only has a double. Should i let this
    influence my purchase? Does this make a big difference. Does anyone have any recommendations on
    which i should buy
     
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  2. Ken

    Ken Guest

    "tou" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > I am considering buying either a Fuji Professional or a Trek 2300. I noticed one of the principle
    > differences is the trek has a triple crank and the Fuji only has a double. Should i let this
    > influence my purchase? Does this make a big difference.

    Are you an older person who plans to ride up mountains? If yes, then a triple might be a good idea.
     
  3. unless you have a really flat landscape and/or are a cat 1 or 2 racer, I advocate triples.

    If it's really hilly, I think it's very important to get a triple. Roberto Heras of US postal, one
    of the 5 best climbers in the world, rode a triple on the steepest stages (up to 24%) of the 2002
    Vuelta. ( He won the stage when lesser pros, like the 2nd place Vuelta finisher of the year before,
    could hardly keep going)

    Lance rode a 39-24 double on Alpe D'Huez. That's on a 16 lb bike with no spare, no food and one
    water bottle.

    That means if you are 90% as strong as Lance,don't carry a spare or more than one water bottle, or a
    jacket- a 39-27 is just fine ( I'm being sarcastic, unless you are a a cat 1 or 2 who really IS 90%
    as strong as Lance.
     
  4. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "remove the polite word to reply" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > unless you have a really flat landscape and/or are a cat 1
    or 2 racer,
    > I advocate triples.
    >
    > If it's really hilly, I think it's very important to get
    a triple.
    > Roberto Heras of US postal, one of the 5 best climbers in
    the world,
    > rode a triple on the steepest stages (up to 24%) of the
    2002 Vuelta. (
    > He won the stage when lesser pros, like the 2nd place
    Vuelta finisher
    > of the year before, could hardly keep going)
    >
    > Lance rode a 39-24 double on Alpe D'Huez. That's on a 16
    lb bike with
    > no spare, no food and one water bottle.

    Don't forget no spare tire around his middle.

    > That means if you are 90% as strong as Lance,don't carry a
    spare or
    > more than one water bottle, or a jacket- a 39-27 is just
    fine ( I'm
    > being sarcastic, unless you are a a cat 1 or 2 who really
    IS 90% as
    > strong as Lance.

    It depends on your riding style. If you like to stand and stomp, a double is probably fine. If you
    like to sit and spin, a triple is what you need. After so many years of mountain biking, I prefer
    the latter. I like around a 30 inch gear for around here. I could deal with a 39-27, but I would
    prefer not to.

    Matt O.
     
  5. Rivermist

    Rivermist Guest

    You can get a triple or double put on any bike. Buy the bike that is the best fit, then get the
    double or triple put on there.

    As to whether to use a double or triple, I suggest you use a double. Even if you are new to cycling
    you will get fit and not need the triple unless you are climbing a mountain. I live in the Atlanta
    area which is very hilly. I get by fine with a double.

    Also, I have heard that a triple sometimes doesn't shift as smoothly as a double. There is more
    potential for foul-up.

    "tou" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I am considering buying either a Fuji Professional or a Trek 2300. I
    noticed
    > one of the principle differences is the trek has a triple crank and the
    Fuji
    > only has a double. Should i let this influence my purchase? Does this make
    a
    > big difference. Does anyone have any recommendations on which i should buy
     
  6. On Thu, 05 Jun 2003 02:37:27 GMT, "tou" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I am considering buying either a Fuji Professional or a Trek 2300. I noticed one of the principle
    >differences is the trek has a triple crank and the Fuji only has a double. Should i let this
    >influence my purchase? Does this make a big difference. Does anyone have any recommendations on
    >which i should buy

    A triple is a good idea, in my opinion. It's more versatile, and the only real disadvantage is a
    tiny bit of extra weight.

    Jasper
     
  7. Pbwalther

    Pbwalther Guest

    >the trek has a triple crank and the Fuji only has a double. Should i let this influence my
    >purchase? Does this make a big difference.

    Well, that depends.

    If you tend to have a low cadence and like to climb hills out of the saddle, a double is just fine.
    If you like to sit and spin, a triple is probably a better choice.

    Also your area makes a difference too. You can get by on short steep hills with a double. Longer
    hills are more of a problem.

    Also, for some people, a triple is seen as a wimp thing. So it depends on your attitude also.
     
  8. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "tou" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I am considering buying either a Fuji Professional or a Trek 2300. I noticed one of the principle
    > differences is the trek has a triple crank and the Fuji only has a double. Should i let this
    > influence my purchase? Does this make a big difference. Does anyone have any recommendations on
    > which i should buy

    It makes a big difference for some riders in some terrains. If you think you may need it (now, or
    some years from now) it's much cheaper to get it now. It really represents an insignificant penalty
    (weight, shifting).
     
  9. Buddha

    Buddha Guest

    On Thu, 05 Jun 2003 11:31:49 GMT, "Rivermist" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I live in the Atlanta area which is very hilly.

    Boy is that true.

    >I get by fine with a double.

    You sir have my respect. Every time I slugging up one of those Cobb County hills I wish I
    had a triple.
     
  10. Andy Kriger

    Andy Kriger Guest

    "tou" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > I am considering buying either a Fuji Professional or a Trek 2300. I noticed one of the principle
    > differences is the trek has a triple crank and the Fuji only has a double. Should i let this
    > influence my purchase? Does this make a big difference. Does anyone have any recommendations on
    > which i should buy
    >
    >
    >

    The time when you have no energy left and a long hill in front of you, you'll be glad you
    got a triple.
     
  11. Review Boy

    Review Boy Guest

    "Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "tou" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > Are you an older person who plans to ride up mountains? If yes, then a triple might be a
    > good idea.

    Wow, that's interesting advice! I have observed many young, fit cyclists taking advantage of their
    granny ring on steep hills.

    I have had doubles and triples, but I have never wished to be without my lowest gear, whatever it
    was at the time, even when I was doing centuries and double centuries.

    There seems to be an anti-triple chic that has some sort of vaguely macho aspect to it. I am
    surprised that some of these folks don't remove the smaller of their two chainrings and the front
    derailleur and shifter. That would save several ounces and clean up the crank area. After all, only
    out of shape weanies need anything less than 52 teeth, right?
     
  12. Bob

    Bob Guest

    "Review Boy" <review [email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > "tou" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    > > Are you an older person who plans to ride up mountains? If yes, then a triple might be a
    > > good idea.
    >
    > Wow, that's interesting advice! I have observed many young, fit cyclists taking advantage of their
    > granny ring on steep hills.
    >
    > I have had doubles and triples, but I have never wished to be without my lowest gear, whatever it
    > was at the time, even when I was doing centuries and double centuries.
    >
    > There seems to be an anti-triple chic that has some sort of vaguely macho aspect to it. I am
    > surprised that some of these folks don't remove the smaller of their
    two
    > chainrings and the front derailleur and shifter. That would save several ounces and clean up the
    > crank area. After all, only out of shape weanies need anything less than 52 teeth, right?
    >
    >
    >
    Plus, the real benefit of a triple occurs when you're tired. You might be able to crank up a hill (I
    use a 39 front chainring and a pretty large rear cog) in the beginning of your ride that you won't
    be able to get up at the end.

    --
    Bob ctviggen at rcn dot com
     
  13. > After all, only out of shape weanies need anything less than 52 teeth, right?

    Get with the program man, that was yesterday. 52 teeth? No self-respecting cyclist would ride with a
    52 tooth chainring! Shimano knew that when they designed the triple with a 52 large instead of a 53
    like the double has. So, not only do you have to remove the inner two chainrings, you even have to
    tear off that worthless 52 and replace it as well.

    Geez. The quality of info here on the 'net sure has declined over the years! :>)

    More seriously, I have a piece on doubles vs triples on our website at

    www.ChainReaction.com/triples.htm

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  14. Ken wrote:
    > Are you an older person who plans to ride up mountains? If yes, then a triple might be a
    > good idea.

    It's also good for people with bad knees.
     
  15. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Fri, 06 Jun 2003 13:03:07 -0700, <%[email protected]>, Bill Davidson
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Ken wrote:
    >> Are you an older person who plans to ride up mountains? If yes, then a triple might be a
    >> good idea.
    >
    >It's also good for people with bad knees.

    It's handy to have when towing loaded trailers.
    --
    zk
     
  16. Allan Leedy

    Allan Leedy Guest

    A nice alternative to the triple (which can be more temperamental than a double) is a double with a
    long-cage derailleur (from, say, Shimano's mountain bike components groups) and a 13-34 cassette on
    the back. The 39-34 makes a pretty good climbing gear, not all that much different from, say, a
    30-27. "tou" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I am considering buying either a Fuji Professional or a Trek 2300. I
    noticed
    > one of the principle differences is the trek has a triple crank and the
    Fuji
    > only has a double. Should i let this influence my purchase? Does this make
    a
    > big difference. Does anyone have any recommendations on which i should buy
     
  17. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    How did this become a "Triple Crank" from a "Triple Chainwheel" or is this one of the many oddities
    of bicycling jargon? I can't imagine what a third crank on a bicycle would do.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  18. [email protected] wrote in message news:<U04Fa.996$%[email protected]>...

    > How did this become a "Triple Crank" from a "Triple Chainwheel" or is this one of the many
    > oddities of bicycling jargon? I can't imagine what a third crank on a bicycle would do.

    I suppose it's related to the "front willie" thread.

    Stella
     
  19. Jobst Brandt wrote:
    > ...I can't imagine what a third crank on a bicycle would do.

    In our case, it allows the second stoker to pedal :)

    John Thurston Juneau, Alaska
     
  20. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    John Thurston writes:

    >> I can't imagine what a third crank on a bicycle would do.

    > In our case, it allows the second stoker to pedal :)

    On which side of the bicycle is this "third crank" (as in the title of this thread) in contrast to
    those of a customary pair of cranks?

    Jobst Brandt jobst[email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
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