Triple or Double?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by rt1965, Jul 20, 2006.

  1. rt1965

    rt1965 New Member

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    Well I have narrowed my quest for a new bike to a couple of choices. Now the question is whether to buy a triple or a double? I live in the Phoenix area so there really are'nt any hills to train on locally. The thing is though is that I would probably spend a little time up in the mountains from time to time. Flagstaff is a pretty close drive and I can see myself going there once or twice a month to do some hill riding. Is that a good enough reason to buy a triple? If my training is primarily flat, does the double have more of an advatange other than a little less weight?

    Incidently, I have narrowed my choices to the Specialized Roubaix Expert or the Elite, and the Trek 5.0 or 5.2 Pilot. Thanks for any advice!
     
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  2. capwater

    capwater New Member

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    Big can of worms here. Lots depends on your riding style and fitness level. An alternative to a triple would be a compact double. Personally, I'm a fairly strong rider and have always gone with doubles but that's just my personal approach. Surf around this forum you'll find many threads. If you are doing mainly flattish rides, you probably would be more suited for a double. The weight difference isn't a big factor, leave that to the guys climbing Alpe du Huez. Also, you'll find lots of threads talking about converting a triple to a double. Thus, there seems to be a fair amount of buyer remorse and desire to change setups.
     
  3. tdl123321

    tdl123321 New Member

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    I'm a newbie and I live in a hilly area- at this stage I absolutley have to have a triple. The only disadvantage other than weight is that there is a lot of overlap between gears. I'm sure there are others but this is the only one I have noticed.


    Oh yea, there is one more... it seems that a triple signals that you are a "newbie or weak" rider, but personally my ego can handle it.
     
  4. artmichalek

    artmichalek New Member

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    A compact double might be the best compromise. It will be very easy to switch back and forth between a tight cassette for normal riding and a bigger one for your trips to the mountains. Triples are great if you ride a lot of varried terrain with big climbs, but tend to be less ideal for fast group rides over flat to slightly rolling ground.
     
  5. capwater

    capwater New Member

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    Nah, I'd never call you a weak rider..... Ride what feels right (wear what ya want also). That being said, you are seeing manufacturers promoting compact doubles more frequently on the mi/higher end of their lines than triples. That allows you better gearing without all the overlap of the triple. Is this what the public is buying or what the manufacturers are marketing.
     
  6. rt1965

    rt1965 New Member

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    compact doubles 
    Can you please explain this term? Maybe give some examples of gearing? I am not an expert by far and it's been a number of years since I was into biking.
     
  7. Lonnie Utah

    Lonnie Utah Banned

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    A compact double has less teeth on the front chain rings than a traditional double. For example a traditional double has 53 teeth on the big ring and 39 teeth on the small inside ring. You'll see it notated as 53x39. A compact double usually has a 50 teeth on the big ring and on the inside ring has 34 (50x34) or 36 (50x36) teeth. The difference is usually made up on the rear cassette with lower and closer gearing. My Compact double has a 23x11 (10 speed) rear cassette while my old triple (53x39x30) has a 12x26 (9 speed).

    L
     
  8. NativeTexan

    NativeTexan New Member

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    No hills in Phoenix? What about that ride up and down South Mountain??

    There used to be a LBS sponsored Saturday morning ride departing from Southern and Mill, all around the reservation and up South Mountain and back. If that isn't a hill, I hope to never see one!

    I'd go with a double and get the legs to make it work!
     
  9. cPritch67

    cPritch67 New Member

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    I agree....
     
  10. rt1965

    rt1965 New Member

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    Thanks for the replies everyone. It looks like a new Specialized Roubaix Expert will be on order this week!:D And I too get the feeling a double will be just fine for me!:)
     
  11. badkarma

    badkarma New Member

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    Get a double. If you're concerned about climbing, then get a comp. double
     
  12. vchu7105

    vchu7105 New Member

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    No hills, get a normal double. I have a triple and compact, the triple has more problems and chances of shifting problems. The compact, I dont like the big gaps in jumps when shifting id wish I got the normal double.

     
  13. Eastway82

    Eastway82 New Member

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    I usually ride a normal double (with either a 12-23 or 13-26 cassette). Recently converted my training bike to triple (30/42/53) and not so happy with the shift quality etc (there's more chain thrashing around, so it seems to be less precise). And there's just nothing round here that needs the granny ring. However, just spent three days in the alps watching the Tour and I'm very happy with the fact I could get up the Joux Plane and a few other cols in 30/26 - I reckon on 39/26 I would have been screwed.
     
  14. rt1965

    rt1965 New Member

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    Just want to say thanks for everyone's suggestions! I actually changed my mind at the last minute. I called the LBS to ask a question about a Trek bike, and they informed me they still had 2005 models in the box. So with a nice price of $600 less then the 2006 model, I just came home with a Trek Pilot 5.2. They swapped the triple set up for a nice compact double set up. I am a happy camper!:D
     
  15. Ebergram

    Ebergram New Member

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    I'm thinking of buying the pilot 5.2 how do you enjoy the your new ride?

    thank you
    lee;)
     
  16. rt1965

    rt1965 New Member

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    I'm thinking of buying the pilot 5.2 how do you enjoy the your new ride?
    
    
    It's really nice. Very comfortable. I'm actually going back tomorrow to have it fit, and it will only get better after that, but so far I am very happy.
     
  17. mikesbytes

    mikesbytes New Member

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    I ride with a triple, it came with the bike and I rearly use it. However, it does mean that I can have a nice close cluster, getting away with 42/21 as my low gear with the granny for that rear occassion. Theres a small increase in weight and occassionaly you go down to the granny by mistake, but no big deal. Most riders prefer to use a double and to be honest if the bike only had a double I wouldn't bother changing it to a triple.
     
  18. fauxpas

    fauxpas New Member

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    Can't you just buy the extra bits to do the conversion when you do hit the mountains?


    If I think correctly (which I rarely do) if you buy the bike setup for triple ring, then you could buy a double ring for it and that would be all you need.

    I would think the pain in the butt would be converting from 2 to 3 ring due to rear derailluer cage length...

    My STI shifters are for 2 or 3 ring, so again, if I think correctly, if you buy it 3 ring, you can convert to 2 ring with just the chainring as the expense. Leave it 2 ring whilst riding at home, then pop the 3 back on in the mountains...
     
  19. rt1965

    rt1965 New Member

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    Well, I've already bought the bike and I did have it converted to a compact double. They did have to change the front derailer, and the shifter on top of the crankset. All is well, the bike is fantastic. I am going back tomorrow for a full fitting.
     
  20. FREDBLACK

    FREDBLACK New Member

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    i am an alright climber and still use a triple. when people are mashing up hills standing, i am passing them seated pedalling at 80-100 rpm. So it deoends on your riding style.
     
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